inline stripping flange

Distillation methods and improvements.

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absinthe
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inline stripping flange

Post by absinthe » Wed Dec 05, 2007 9:45 pm

i just thought i would share pics of my new addition to my stills...

an "in line stripping flange" (or a mash injector) to convert any reflux still into a continuous still.. the only thing you need to do to the still itself is to add a drain hole to the bottom of the keg:

Image

so you can add an overflow (the T piece is to stop the mash from syphoning out):

Image

i got the idea from an in line beer carbonator in a commercial brewery (cant find the link)

Image

Image

the mash goes in the side (preheated if possible.. i plan to have a tub with a coil of copper that the hot slops run into from the over flow and the mash will be pumped through it before entering the injector) and is then pumped up the centre of the tower till it get to the end of the pipe and flows into the vapour stream....

Image

Image

i simply stick the copper pipe up the guts of some SS scours for packing..

i haven't welded the piece of pipe into the elbow because i will be testing different lengths of pipe to get the best result

Image

the test run i did last night performed better than expected and that was without the mash prewarmer...
Whiskey, the most popular of the cold cures that don't work (Leonard Rossiter)

HookLine
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Post by HookLine » Wed Dec 05, 2007 9:59 pm

Well, someone has been a busy boy. Now your runs are only limited by how long you can stay awake and how much wash you have.

And nice pussy.
Be safe.
Be discreet.
And have fun.

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Post by Skymeat » Thu Dec 06, 2007 12:07 am

Ive got to say that is bad ass. I started giggling looking at it. Great innovation.






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absinthe
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Post by absinthe » Thu Dec 06, 2007 3:57 am

Well, someone has been a busy boy. Now your runs are only limited by how long you can stay awake and how much wash you have.

And nice pussy.
well i have a 44 gallon fermenter and if my theory is correct it should run heaps quicker this way as the mash will be taking heat directly from the hot slops so it should increase the efficiency heaps

oh and theses every mans dream in the photos TWO pussy's one old and one young :P
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punkin
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Post by punkin » Thu Dec 06, 2007 10:31 am

Absinthe, could you please explain the theory and practice of how it works for me? I don't get it.

I'll have 100 gallons of peach wine i have to deal with shortly and would be happy to build a new head for my keg just so i can strip it in two runs instead of ten. 8)






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Post by CoopsOz » Thu Dec 06, 2007 2:45 pm

How do you know when to dump the spent wash from the boiler? Or are you doing a complete run, turning off the flame, dumping the backset and then opening the valve IOT fill the boiler and then sparking up the flame again? I appreciate that the mash is gonna be pre warmed so your subsequent boils will take less time.

Edit - just corrected a few grammatical errors.
Last edited by CoopsOz on Fri Dec 07, 2007 1:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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absinthe
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Post by absinthe » Thu Dec 06, 2007 3:05 pm

I'll have 100 gallons of peach wine i have to deal with shortly and would be happy to build a new head for my keg just so i can strip it in two runs instead of ten.
you would be able to run this in ONE continuous run no stopping.

CoopsOz, the drain hole in the keg ad the piece of copper pipe thats attached acts as an overflow. the level in the keg wont ever get over the horizontal pipe in the T piece on the end.

so you slowly pump the warm wash into the tower (the long copper pipe on the flange goes up inside the tower not down into the keg) with the boiler at full steam..

as the mash falls down through the packing the vapour knocks the alcohol up and the lower boiling stuff goes down (basic reflux).....

you need to make sure that there is no grains or to much yeast or it will block the packing...
although this is not a major safety concern as the overflow also acts as a safety valve as the boiler is "open" to the atmosphere

as the level in the boiler increases it slowly dribbles out the side of the keg through the overflow then into the mash prewarmer

i got the idea partly from the mother site also (still designs, continuous stills)
http://homedistiller.org/graphics/cont_concept.gif" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;" rel="nofollow
Whiskey, the most popular of the cold cures that don't work (Leonard Rossiter)

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Post by 19Kilo » Fri Dec 07, 2007 7:38 am

I ve been thinking on this as well. I was just gonna zap a hole on the top of the kegboiler and run a piece of pipe from another keg fermentor. My only reservation was in the foreshots. How is making your cuts affected with a constant inflow of fresh wort?


+EDIT
Also, what are you using for a pre-heater, and what temp are you heating to? Im really thinking of doing this!

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Post by absinthe » Fri Dec 07, 2007 8:44 am

the problem with a hole in the boiler is you are just adding wash to the boiling wash...not letting the vapour do its work first (reflux)... (sorry if I'm not the most coherent atm Ive been sampling my product :P)

the forshots etc doesn't matter as this is used only for stripping the wash before the final spirit run... or if (as I'm hoping) if its efficient you can use it to produce fuel alcohol

the prewarmer you are aiming for as hot as you can get it without it boiling as this will reduce heat loss in the boiler and slowing down the vapour stream
Whiskey, the most popular of the cold cures that don't work (Leonard Rossiter)

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Post by absinthe » Fri Dec 07, 2007 8:46 am

sorry the preheater will be just a coil of copper pipe in a bucket with the overflow "hot slops" running into it (see other post)
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punkin
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Post by punkin » Fri Dec 07, 2007 10:17 am

When will you be trying it mate?
Very interested in your results, doing the peaches in two seperate ferments of 180 litres each time, so this would save me a whole lotta rootin round.

Figured the concept while i was thinking on it at work yesterday. It'd be tricky to get the flow into the head right, i figure a bucket at a height above the still with a float switch to your pump, then a gate valve on the line down to adjust the flow rate into the still :?:

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Post by absinthe » Fri Dec 07, 2007 4:54 pm

well i brew in a 44 gallon drum with a drain attached.. so i will have a bucket under the drain with a screen filter and pump from the bottom of that... as for the flow the pump will only be small so i shouldn't have much pressure and i will have a small valve in line also..

to work out the flow rate (this is what i have figured out from the Small test run i did with 1 ltr of 80%abv heads diluted down to 10% abv as a test wash) i was looking at the temperature and keeping it between 85-90°C (about 50-60%abv) the wash that came outta the boiler had an immeasurable amount of alcohol left in her (although i had plain water in the boiler to start it normally i would have mash and wait till its stripped right out before starting the flow)
Whiskey, the most popular of the cold cures that don't work (Leonard Rossiter)

punkin
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Post by punkin » Fri Dec 07, 2007 9:47 pm

absinthe wrote:well i brew in a 44 gallon drum with a drain attached.. so i will have a bucket under the drain with a screen filter and pump from the bottom of that... as for the flow the pump will only be small so i shouldn't have much pressure and i will have a small valve in line also..

to work out the flow rate (this is what i have figured out from the Small test run i did with 1 ltr of 80%abv heads diluted down to 10% abv as a test wash) i was looking at the temperature and keeping it between 85-90°C (about 50-60%abv) the wash that came outta the boiler had an immeasurable amount of alcohol left in her (although i had plain water in the boiler to start it normally i would have mash and wait till its stripped right out before starting the flow)
Please keep me updated Absinthe.
I reckon this will save me takin a couplea sickies to strip. 8)

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Post by cruzan » Sat Dec 08, 2007 11:34 am

did you weld that copper tee?

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Post by andre.silent » Sat Dec 08, 2007 11:42 am

Hi,

I am new in this forum, however not new in the distilling. I used to do it long time ago and recently after some time of watching the forum I am just about to start again.
It looks like this moment is perfect to enter the forum as I always was using the continuously run column.
Now that I saw that there are more people interested in that I would be happy to share some of my experiences.
First of all I must admit that in continoous disilling there is much more engineering than art. Hoever there is still plenty of enjoyment.
The invention presented by absinthe is great and very helpfull. Still there are some ways of improvement which are simple and reliable (don't bother with any valves):
1. Install a liebig type heat exchanger to preheat the wash by means of spent one coming out from the boiler. Assuming that you pump into the column 10 litres/h of wash you can save (gain) practically 0,8 kW of heating power, and the same time getting spent wash going out in acceptable temperature of 40 deg. C - which doesn't evolve to much smell.
2. You may use really small boiler (intead of keg you can use a household kettle with a volume not bigger than 1 - 2 litres). The great advantage is that you don't have to heat up the big amount of liquid at the start up.
3. The best is to use a feed pump (for example peristaltic) and then after the start up and getting the column running in stable conditions you may go to sleep (of course I would not advise it). On the other hand this is where the beauty is - the installation may be small but still capable to process any amount of wash in one (long) run.
4. If you are afraid of loosing alcohol with the spent wash you may install a stripping section of the column below the feedeng point. This is quite importan when one would like to make a "second strip" using feed of more than 40% of alcohol.

I hope my post is sent and received correctly (this is my firs time) but if yes and moreover if there is anybody interested please let me know and I will try to make a drawing of the installation I used to run for years an with a great success.

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Post by absinthe » Sat Dec 08, 2007 2:28 pm

i will be implementing almost all of you suggestions (except i will be using a bucket and coil type of heat exchanger, i think this will be easier to setup and run), as i said in my earlier posts...

as for the small boiler its not really necessary as i will be just putting mash into the boiler anyway and waiting till all the alcohol is stopped before i start the flow to the flange.. also the size of the burner i have and the fact its on natural gas means that it would be a disadvantage to run a electric kettle (unless i made my own with a 5kW element)....

as for the copper T. nope, i didn't weld that, its recycled. i did weld the 1" tri-clover onto the end though

please can people READ all the WRITING with my post before commenting.. i have had several questions and comments that have been explained and answered.. in the case of the heat exchanger 3 times now

i don't mean to be rude and I'm normally quite happy to help with any questions but it annoys me when the answer to the question is in the original post
Whiskey, the most popular of the cold cures that don't work (Leonard Rossiter)

lowerarchy

Post by lowerarchy » Sat Dec 08, 2007 3:21 pm

andre.silent:

Good point about the leibig condensor. Seems like it'd be much more efficient than a bucket and easier to insulate. But what did you mean by adding a stripping section below the feed point? Not quite sure I can visualize that.

absinthe:

Neat rig. How do you figure out the flow rate? As you said, the spent stuff coming out of the boiler had an immesurable amount of alcohol, but aren't you concerned that your wastage will be high over the long term if you don't carefully calibrate exactly the flow going in with the distillate coming out?

And hey, this just came to me - why don't you just poke another hole in your keg, have your pump feed through that and have the copper pipe come up from the bottom? It seems like that'd be a most efficient pre-heater.

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Post by andre.silent » Sun Dec 09, 2007 8:46 am

Hi,

first of all I am very happy that I am in.
Absinthe , sorry for not considering all information that you wrote. I was simply too enthusiastic to take care of everything.

I am somehow "ellectrically oriented" and alway tried to avoid any gas heating (ellectricity is easier to control). Moreover I have alway been distilling with quite low capacity (10 - 12 l/h of mash) so ellectrical heating was still good enough.

I attach the sketch of my first plant which I built approx 20 years ago. This time I would do it in a slightly different way, but I send it anyway as it seems to be a good an simple example of continuously operated column.

The most probably some of you do it already, however let me explain how it works just to encourage new in the bussines and perhaps start the disscussion about details that could be improved.
You can find it there:

http://i275.photobucket.com/albums/jj31 ... olumn1.gif" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;" rel="nofollow

1. Hydraulics - what comes in comes out.
The overflow is the best solution to keep a constant level in a boiler. It is fully automatic and trouble free. This works so well that you don't need to keep the mash flow at precisely constant level. What comes in comes out - when you stop feeding the column it will stop do discharge, and it will take some time until the boiler runs dry.
The only thing to remember is that despite the plant is opened to the atmosphere (it must be!) there is a slight overpressure inside. Therefore the liquid level in the boiler is lower than the level of the overflow. If you heat up the boiler using an external heating source, eg. gas or hot plate you don't need to bother to much. When you use an internal electrical heating element you must take care to keep the liquid level so to cover your heating element all the time. If not - you will strart to burn the mash and sooner or later your heating element brakes.

2. Heat balance - get as much as you can.
The goal of the mash preheating is rather the heat recovery than anything else.
When you are using gas and don't bother with the energy consumption this is not a big deal however what you still get in return is the spent wash much cooler and much easier to handle.

3. Mass ballance - miracles of ethanol-water equilibrium.
If someone is familiar with the water-ethanol equilibrium curve he can easily see that it takes only very few steps to get the spent wash with an alcohol content which is really negligible. As this is practically unmeasurable using common methods and equipment I did once an experiment (I was also somehow sceptic about it). I collected several litres of spent wash and made a quantitative distillation in a glasware system. The distillate was concentrated enough to measure the concentration using a hydrometer - the result was (after the recalculation) the 0,1% in spent wash. Even the method was not very accurate - who cares about 0,1 or 0,2%.
The conclusion is that you don't have to be afraid about the alcohol losses in spent wash even if you pump the mash directly into the boiler (alternative A at the sketch).
However if you would like to make a second strip run using as a feed what you got from the first strip than I would recommend to feed the column somwhere in the middle of its height (alternative B on the sketch).
If not satisfied with amount of alcohol which you loose this way -you may collect what comes out from the boiler and keep it for the next time.

4. Strenght of distillate - no roses without thorns.
As you run the still all the time having almost nothing in a boiler you have to compensate it with a higher reflux (when you do it with the same column). The best way to overcome this is again to add a stripping section to your column and connect the feeding pipe just above it.
There is however one thing that affects the performance of the column when run continuously - that is CO2.
When you operate your still in a batch way you get rid of CO2 almost completely at the preheating stage.
When run continuously you put a substantial amount of CO2 all the time with a mash (it is always there). The CO2 presence decreases the heat and mass transfer coefficients and makes you column performig worse.

Sorry guys for making a bit too long speach but this is my bad habit as I used to work as a teacher in university and this usually takes 45 minutes in one go.

Now I have to go to my own work bu will be back soon.

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Post by absinthe » Tue Dec 11, 2007 2:51 am

a leibig condenser would probably be more space effective but i have a metres copper coil that i already used as a pre-heater (i pumped the cooling water through this with is immersed in the next batch of wash) so it will be be easy and cost nothing to setup..

i may in the future use a leibig condenser but this is easier at the moment...

as for the stripping section i have one already :
i simply stick the copper pipe up the guts of some SS scours for packing..
so the feed pipe inside the column is surrounded with SS scourers i will use packing above when I'm going for a "clean" strip (vodka) and none or maybe one above for flavoured mashes.

i did also consider putting a coil on top of the boiler (under the layer of top insulation i use) as another pre-heater (kinda like the pipe through the boiler as lowerarchy suggested.. but i think that would just be taking heat from the vapour stream anyway.. cooling the boiler.. so i didn't see the point i may as well keep the vapour speed up as much as possible...
Whiskey, the most popular of the cold cures that don't work (Leonard Rossiter)

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Post by frikz » Fri Dec 21, 2007 8:09 am

Very interesting thread. I already played with the idea of a continuous still once and I'll probably give it a try sometime, I think it's interesting from an engineering point of view.

@andre: Did you actually use your still as continuous with a decent amount of packing/reflux to get high purity alcohol or did you just use it for stripping continuously? Cause if you would use it to get pure alcohol, you would end up with most of the lower boiling components (methanol, ethyl acetace etc) in your distillate whereas you discard those first when doing batch runs. You could remove those too in a continuous still if you modified it to do multicomponent distillation, but that would definitely add some extra complexity.

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Post by andre.silent » Wed Dec 26, 2007 9:59 am

frikz:
This requires some explanation. This is also a piece of history and even somebody finds it unreal it was really so. Perhaps I should send this post also to a "History & Folklore".

The story goes back to early 80' of the previous century in Poland.
This was last decade of the socialistis govenership in Poland.
It is really difficult to believe but the purchase of many basic goods were limited. One could buy butter, meat, cigarets, coffee, vodka, sugar, chocolate, etc only in limited amount a month and only in exchange of special tickets (coupons).
Even so it was not easy to buy vodka! I remember long queues and even fights for it.
One has to know that distilling alcohol in private was strictly forbidden (actually it is now as well).
Then Martial Law was introduced in 1981 and of course the society started to resist in many different ways. Beside the demonstrations, strikes, illegal books printing, pepople started also to make a home made vodka. The reason was not only taht you could hardly buy a bottle in a shop. This was a symbolic fight against the regime. But it was really dagerous - one could be imprisoned only for possesing the moonshining equipment.

Nevetrtheless the moonshing started to be a "social habit" and many people who would never dare to do it started to make their own "bimber" (this is a Polish word for mooshined vodka). Again tasting "bimber" and sharing the knowledge about the"production" became a topic of family and friend gatherings.

I was freshly graduated student of Process Engineering and actually was not very fond of vodka. Unfortunately it was not easy to avoid tasting this horrible stuff (to not offend the host or other "manufacturers").
This was an impulse to start my own activity and educate other people.

Now I come to the point.

I put up the distillation column and started to experiment. The feed I used was only a sugar mash (with some sliced apples just for flavour).
My first goal was the neutral alcohol (to make vodka, gin, fruit digestives, etc.)
However very soon I realised (with of course help of my more drinking friends) that the product coming directly form the column at approx. 40 - 45% abv. was a very nice drink, mellow in taste, not creating to much hangover and higly appreciated by everybody.

So this became a major part of the production. I actually became a "contract distiller" being invited for "distilling parties" bringing my column packed in a suitcase, distilling a mash prepared by the host (usually getting 10% of distillate as a commission).
Apparently nobody cared to do anything more to the distillate. I have never heard any complains about the quality and "side effects" after even hard drinking.

This long story leads to the certain conclusion which was quite suprising for me.
Even the drink contained all impurities which you normally discard during the batch distillation the result was really perfect. I must say that I cannot explain this the other way than probably by the fact the sugar mash didnt give too much byproducts during the fermentation. On the other hand after a purification (in batch) by removing foreshots and tails, the result was not even half as good in taste as the original strip run.

I guess that once you make a mash form other than sugar sources it is probably much more necessary to purify the raw alcohol.

I have not much of experience with other mashes than only sugar based. This was the reason that I had only two possibilities: "bimber" or neutral spirit.

The "bimber" story you know already.

The neutral spirit has to be made in a bach system.
I am sorry to dissapoint you but this is the only reasonable solution.
Theoretically it could be posiible to create a column with several products handling (foreshots, heads, middle-run and tails). Practically it would end up with the multi tray column with a lot of trays - not applicable and not feasible.

I still think that even such simple plant has several advantages. First is the posibility to run batches as big as several hundres liters in one go. The other is that you save plenty of time and energy because you dont need to heat up the mash at the startup. Moreover you don't loose the heat of the spent wash and once it is only warm coming out from the preheater it is much easier to handle.

If you go for really big batches than you still get a big amount of the raw spirit. It could be well above 30 - 50 litres (depending o your mash strenght and the raw spirit strenght). If this is the case than is is again worth to use a continuous plant to get rid of the most of remaining water.

Then you have to continue in a batch system to get rid of all undesirable components.


Several hints how to make it easier and more efficient (note: only applicable when you go for neutral spirit).
1. Treat your raw spirit with small amount of NaOH. The goal is to decompose the ethyl acetate into ethanol and sodium acetate (also other esters). The amount should be realy small (as small is the content of ethyl acetate). It is better to put less than too much - you should make some experiments to establish the correct value.
2. After that you should add few drops of the KMnO4 solution (purple crystals). This is the strong oxidant transforming aldehydes into acids. It is so strong that it could oxidize even ethanol into acetic acid - this however is avoided due to high pH of the solution after addition of NaOH.
3. The reaction is rather fast so after couple of minutes you can see the precipitation of black and brown flakes of MnO2 - this is the end.
4. Filter the raw spirit and off you go with the batch distillation.
5. Please notice that the best result of the rectiffication you get only when the feed is the high strenght alcohol. Only then you get sharp division between different fractions. Water makes them more diffused.

I hope that you can use some of my experience.

andre.silent

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Post by HookLine » Wed Dec 26, 2007 4:44 pm

Good read, Andre, thanks for that. Interesting to hear about how life used to be under the communists.
Even the drink contained all impurities which you normally discard during the batch distillation the result was really perfect. I must say that I cannot explain this the other way than probably by the fact the sugar mash didnt give too much byproducts during the fermentation.
I think there is a lot of truth in that.

I also agree that the cleanest neutral spirits come from a batch distillation system.

And thanks for the hints you gave at the end.
Be safe.
Be discreet.
And have fun.

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Post by Safegyde » Thu Dec 27, 2007 8:47 am

Wow andre.silent, you remind me of a professor I had once. Nice story too.

Absinthe, my only question is when do you sleep?? You are building this awesome still, running a continous run, making mash, typing on the computer, and........am I missing anything? Busy guy! :)
Shine on you crazy diamonds!!

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Post by stoker » Thu Dec 27, 2007 11:56 am

cool, a european, someone from poland, an engineer, a process engineer, and chemistry in combination with sprit, nice :D
andre.silent wrote:Several hints how to make it easier and more efficient (note: only applicable when you go for neutral spirit).
1. Treat your raw spirit with small amount of NaOH. The goal is to decompose the ethyl acetate into ethanol and sodium acetate (also other esters). The amount should be realy small (as small is the content of ethyl acetate). It is better to put less than too much - you should make some experiments to establish the correct value.
2. After that you should add few drops of the KMnO4 solution (purple crystals). This is the strong oxidant transforming aldehydes into acids. It is so strong that it could oxidize even ethanol into acetic acid - this however is avoided due to high pH of the solution after addition of NaOH.
3. The reaction is rather fast so after couple of minutes you can see the precipitation of black and brown flakes of MnO2 - this is the end.
4. Filter the raw spirit and off you go with the batch distillation.
5. Please notice that the best result of the rectiffication you get only when the feed is the high strenght alcohol. Only then you get sharp division between different fractions. Water makes them more diffused.
What happens with too much NaOH?
do you get chemical reactions during distillation?
-I have too much blood in my alcohol system-

absinthe
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Post by absinthe » Thu Dec 27, 2007 3:01 pm

Absinthe, my only question is when do you sleep?? You are building this awesome still, running a continous run, making mash, typing on the computer, and........am I missing anything? Busy guy!
I'm also a head chef of a busy restaurant. am learning to play the harmonica, construct Tesla coils, am an amateur photographer, and potter in my veggie garden when i can...

so i sleep about 4 hours or so a night :P
Whiskey, the most popular of the cold cures that don't work (Leonard Rossiter)

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Post by andre.silent » Sat Dec 29, 2007 7:11 am

stoker,

This trick with NaOH is not a miraculous medicine. One should remember that the esterification reaction as well a hydrolysis (decomposition of esters) is the equilibrium reaction. This means that you will never reach the end of the reaction even you put plenty of NaOH into the solution.

I don't know what exactly happens when you put to much NaOH into your spirit, but apparently something happens. I guess that in excess of chemicals some reaction may occur during distillation. I once had to get rid of nice batch of spirit because of bad smell which I was not able to remove by distillation (I am afraid that the reason was to much of caustic - so once again: better less than to much).

I have never tried Na2CO3 instead of NaOH - but after reeading several threads about it on the forum I would go for it (it is far mor gentle than NaOH - and should work too).

Regretfully my equipment is gone somwhere and it will take quite a while for me to start again so please let me know once you try - good luck.

andre.silent

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Post by stoker » Sat Dec 29, 2007 7:30 am

Image
a strong base is able to hydrolyse the esters, what is good, the salt is harmless, and the alcohol neather (if its ethanol)
but Na2CO3 or NAHCO3 are not as strong as NaOH, and I think the reaction does not happen. (yes I know, equilibrium, ...)

what it can do is, react with acids present in the wash or spirit and reduce them to salts, so during distillation, acid can not react with alcohol to form esters.

at least, that's what I think of it. and I don't have time to experiment.
-I have too much blood in my alcohol system-

schnell
Angel's Share
Angel's Share
Posts: 224
Joined: Tue Jan 30, 2007 2:47 pm
Location: desert mountains of the west

Post by schnell » Wed Jan 09, 2008 4:18 pm

sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate both hydrolyze ethyl acetate just fine. i've done it, works well.

the reason that you don't add a whole bunch of strong base is that esterification can also be base catalyzed as well. (hydroxyl ion is involved if i remember correctly) the carbonate and bicarbonate are rather weak as bases go, but fully capable of dragging that equilibrium to the right.

another good reason to avoid the lye: you might get it on you. most people don't tryly appreciate bas hydrolysis of proteins until their hands and flesh start to peel off. it's painful, believe me. and it actually takes a sturdy wash to get it off!

but classically, esterification proceeds along the line of the Fisher esterification, which is catalyzed by H+ (bronsted acid). this is the way they'll teach ya to make your own esters in a synthesis lab when using an alcohol and a carboxylic acid.

Aaron

absinthe
Rumrunner
Posts: 534
Joined: Sun Jun 25, 2006 8:29 am
Location: Aussie

Post by absinthe » Wed Jan 09, 2008 5:47 pm

yeah caustic soda is not fun on the skin.. being a chef i play with it quite a bit to clean the grill plate etc... i have seen some nasty burns.. always keep some vinegar handy if you are playing with caustic (lye) water is not a good idea if you are using powdered as it will spread the burn...

anyway getting off the topic now...

i have approx 120 litres of sugar wash to run through my striping flange in a few days I'll keep all you guys posted
Whiskey, the most popular of the cold cures that don't work (Leonard Rossiter)

absinthe
Rumrunner
Posts: 534
Joined: Sun Jun 25, 2006 8:29 am
Location: Aussie

Post by absinthe » Sun Jan 20, 2008 6:52 pm

well shes on the run now... i am still fiddling with the input flow and keeping her at a constant 90°C and getting a good outflow... works a treat

heres some pic of the whole setup:
the fermenter and pump tank
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the filter and pump tank (the filter is just an irrigation filter to stop bits of corn getting through and the pumps a tiny pond pump, the one i normally use to pump the coolant round my beer font)
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the coil preheater.
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i have one turn of pipe on top of the boiler under the insulation.
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and the magic output.. a steady 60%
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Whiskey, the most popular of the cold cures that don't work (Leonard Rossiter)

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