Honey Bear Bourbon

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Re: Honey Bear Bourbon

Postby Still Life » Tue Dec 05, 2017 12:52 am

Sourwood wrote:New guy here, so sorry if this is obvious to some, but what exactly do Oyster shells do? I'm headed to NC soon and could pick some up if they're useful

Hey, Sourwood.
When in doubt, use HD Google Search to find such answers.
Open it, leave a space after the URL, type in a word or term.
Here I typed in oyster shells.

Powerful tool, that is. Hope it helps you out.
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Re: Honey Bear Bourbon

Postby NEGaxSEGa » Tue Dec 05, 2017 5:22 am

zapata wrote:Well that and down in NC they also pave the driveway, don't have much gravel down east. Just throw an oyster roast every year and spread your shells on your dirt path. Might take a couple of parties but eventually it'll be as good as the rich folks gravel roads, heck almost as good as the filthy rich's paved drives!

Yep! And after a few months, it won't even cut your feet up when you go down to check the mail.
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Oak taste

Postby ausibatla » Mon Dec 11, 2017 12:53 am

I just added another 10 liters of HBB at 44.1% to my 50 liter keg. I started with
84 liters of mash, squeezed it all by hand and got 63 liters of beer from it. So I
ended up with 21 liters in each of my fermenter's. From each of these I distilled
7 liters at 21%. I now have 21 liters of wash at 21%. The next day I put that through
the still again and the end result was 10 liters at 44.1%. After adding it to my keg
I now have 37 liters at 34% aging in my American Charred Oak barrel so I thought I would
sample it. I don't know what I'm to expect but it tasted like wood. Even Coca Cola
wouldn't drown the taste. Is this normal. Admittedly I only started at the end of june
and have been adding to it on a regular basis. Should I wait for a few more months
to taste test again or would buying some of that flavouring they add to the sugar
wash to color and flavour it be of help. Just asking.
Cheers. :thumbup:
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Re: Oak taste

Postby zapata » Mon Dec 11, 2017 12:19 pm

ausibatla wrote:I now have 37 liters at 34% aging in my American Charred Oak barrel

Is that a typo? Is it 44% instead of 34? Or did it drop to 34% from 44% while in the barrel? 34% is bound to taste like a watered down whiskey and oak tea.

Even at 44%, your abv's are low. Whisky is usually barrelled around 55-65%. Are you diluting it down to 44% with water before barreling? If so, don't do that. If not, I can't really imagine how you're getting 7 liters of 44% from 21 liters at 21% without going super deep into tails.
What are your cuts like? What are you doing with your feints?

Fill in those blanks, you can probably do something to save it, but off the top of my head I cant think of anything you can do to 34% "whiskey" other than redistill it and put it back on oak at an appropriate abv (or drink white). Which may well turn out amazing, it'll certainly be a unique "process".

(Edit, I think I read it wrong, you're getting 10 liters at 44% from 21 liters @ 21%? That fits for someone making no cuts at all, AND running deep into tails)
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Re: Honey Bear Bourbon

Postby ausibatla » Mon Dec 11, 2017 4:01 pm

I've been watering it down. I thought it had be the same ABV as the store bought bottle.
Misread something somewhere along the way. Seems like 6 months of work and a whole
lot of money out the window.
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Re: Honey Bear Bourbon

Postby ShineonCrazyDiamond » Mon Dec 11, 2017 4:07 pm

Redistill it now.

Well, not to kick ya for it, your own work wasted. This is why so many people try to tell people to read before they dive in. I don't tell anyone what's good for them, but there are reactions in this world to all actions.

You learned a hard one. You can read just enough to perhaps make a damn fine all grain bourbon. But if you don't read enough about other parts, you might just water that bourbon down too much and destroy it.

At least it wasn't a dangerous mistake. You can redistill it and still drink your tears. You're lucky :thumbup:
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Re: Honey Bear Bourbon

Postby NEGaxSEGa » Mon Dec 11, 2017 4:18 pm

ShineonCrazyDiamond wrote:Redistill it now

Just curious, what would you think about him doing a new run of HBB and adding it to this one to bring the proof back up? He'd be retaining the oak character that's already in the watered down stuff, right?
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Re: Honey Bear Bourbon

Postby ShineonCrazyDiamond » Mon Dec 11, 2017 4:36 pm

Perhaps. Took him 6 months to get this far, though. You would have to do equal parts of 80% to get it to the right oaking proof.
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Re: Honey Bear Bourbon

Postby The Baker » Mon Dec 11, 2017 4:41 pm

ShineonCrazyDiamond wrote:Perhaps. Took him 6 months to get this far, though. You would have to do equal parts of 80% to get it to the right oaking proof.


Or a larger quantity at lower proof. (Haven't tried to work it out but not difficult).

Even add one lot to bring proof up somewhat, and later another to bring it to the desired level.

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Re: Honey Bear Bourbon

Postby zapata » Mon Dec 11, 2017 11:12 pm

Man, thats a bummer, sorry dude.

Mixing it with a high proof new batch is an interesting idea. Might be worth playing with a small sample. Even just test mixing a sample with a barrel strength commercial bourbon, white dog, vodka, or even (gasp) everclear would give an idea. But I'd hate to just say do it and you end up wasting a whole new set of batches. Ausibatla, you got any high proof anything laying around you do some test mixes with to at least see if it heads back in the right direction?

Honestly, I wouldnt consider redisitilling it a waste. Consider it a difficult experiment. One that likely won't ever be repeated. But it will definitely up the proof, and remove the over oaked tea flavors. Back into the barrel at the right proof. It certainly isnt wasted or ruined. Who knows, it may even be unique? For sure virtually all of the oak flavors are non volatile and will be removed, but the other chemical changes arent gonna be undone, and the boiling itself is likely to encourage other reactions.
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Re: Honey Bear Bourbon

Postby ausibatla » Tue Dec 12, 2017 3:58 pm

zapata wrote:Man, thats a bummer, sorry dude.

Mixing it with a high proof new batch is an interesting idea. Might be worth playing with a small sample. Even just test mixing a sample with a barrel strength commercial bourbon, white dog, vodka, or even (gasp) everclear would give an idea. But I'd hate to just say do it and you end up wasting a whole new set of batches. Ausibatla, you got any high proof anything laying around you do some test mixes with to at least see if it heads back in the right direction?

Honestly, I wouldnt consider redisitilling it a waste. Consider it a difficult experiment. One that likely won't ever be repeated. But it will definitely up the proof, and remove the over oaked tea flavors. Back into the barrel at the right proof. It certainly isnt wasted or ruined. Who knows, it may even be unique? For sure virtually all of the oak flavors are non volatile and will be removed, but the other chemical changes arent gonna be undone, and the boiling itself is likely to encourage other reactions.


Thanks to all you blokes for the advice. I think I'll just run it through the still again and get rid of the water.
It's a pity to waste all those hours of what I thought was dilligent distilling though. Back to square one with half the alcohol.
Might be cheaper in the long run to just buy Wild Turkey. :crazy:
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Re: Honey Bear Bourbon

Postby Oldvine Zin » Tue Dec 12, 2017 5:33 pm

ausibatla wrote: Back to square one with half the alcohol.
Might be cheaper in the long run to just buy Wild Turkey. :crazy:


Cheaper for sure but, do you really want to drink Wild Turkey??

good luck
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Re: Honey Bear Bourbon

Postby RedwoodHillBilly » Tue Dec 12, 2017 6:22 pm

Oldvine Zin wrote:
ausibatla wrote: Back to square one with half the alcohol.
Might be cheaper in the long run to just buy Wild Turkey. :crazy:


Cheaper for sure but, do you really want to drink Wild Turkey??

good luck
OVZ


Well, If you have to buy booze, Wild Turkey ain't bad (IMHO). I prefer the 100 version. It has the same grain bill that I use. But to each their own.
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Re: Honey Bear Bourbon

Postby Canuckwoods » Wed Dec 13, 2017 4:06 am

Ok, I have been reading this thread for awhile now and will be brewing up this weekend hopefully. Please check my calculations and let me know if I need to make any changes
4 gallons water
0.4 lbs Honey Malt
5.6 lbs Cracked Corn
0.8 lbs white wheat malt
0.8 lbs red wheat malt
0.8 lbs pale malt
Shells
The yeast I was going to use Lavlin 1118 as it seems to work well in my basement how many paks?

I use sterilized eggshells instead of oyster does anyone see any problem with that?

Also in reading the thread, I am leaning towards throwing in some oats any suggestion on how much? the calculator does not give an amount.
Thanks
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Re: Honey Bear Bourbon

Postby still_stirrin » Wed Dec 13, 2017 7:17 am

Canuckwoods wrote:The yeast I was going to use Lavlin 1118 as it seems to work well in my basement how many paks?
One (11g) pack per 5 gallons should be enough, although I use 3 packs per 10 gallons. "One per" should be adequate typically for a 5 gallon ferment, especially if you aerate the wort well at pitching.

But, the champagne yeast really isn't the best strain to use in a flavor-rich recipe like this. I would strongly recommend you consider simple baker's yeast instead. Slightly warmer ferment temperatures will improve the flavor profile of the finished beer (and spirit). Champagne yeast is ideally suited for fruit ferments and can be acceptable in sugar washes provided you don't try to push the potential limit too high.

Canuckwoods wrote:I use sterilized eggshells instead of oyster does anyone see any problem with that?
It'll work, just don't pulverize the eggshells too fine. You simply don't need to.

Canuckwoods wrote:Also in reading the thread, I am leaning towards throwing in some oats any suggestion on how much? the calculator does not give an amount.

I would not use more oats than you have wheat. The oats will smooth the flavor profile of the malts, making them sort of "creamy". But the wheat will do that too...so, it is somewhat redundant to the recipe. I guess you could trade some of the wheat for some oat flakes (ounce for ounce) and it would add a touch of diversity to the mix. Otherwise, it's your call as to how you want to "shape" the flavor.
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Re: Honey Bear Bourbon

Postby ShineonCrazyDiamond » Wed Dec 13, 2017 10:12 am

Canuckwoods wrote:
Also in reading the thread, I am leaning towards throwing in some oats any suggestion on how much? the calculator does not give an amount.
Thanks


Just throw a half pound in. Or, in your case, .4.

The calculator is nice, but it makes it awkward when you start asking for .4 or .5 lbs of malt. The calculator default that was made is for a total volume of 5 gallons, but that is not how the recipe was written. It was written for 5 gallons (ish) of water added to ingredients of 1/2 pound increments. That's easiest for everyone. Is the perfect addition .33 oats? Maybe. Simple enough to ask your brew house for 1/2 lb and move on. The difference isn't going to change the profile all that much.

I took 6 gallon brewers bucket, through the corn and adjuncts in it, and booked around 5 or 6 gallons on the stove. Then, I poured the water in until I got to the level I was comfortable with for headroom and estimated madly volume. It was about 5 gallons -ish. But it could have been 5.5 or 4.5.

As novice, I would just order the recipe as it is, out it in your bucket, and put as much water as you can comfortably fit in the bucket. If that bucket is 5 gallons, then it will mean a little less water, and a little higher sg for you. That would probably help compensate for any mash inefficiencies, anyways, that may occur as a first timer.

Like I said, just throw in a half pound, call it a day. :thumbup:
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You reached for the secret too soon, you cried for the moon.
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