Cornmeal mash

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Cornmeal mash

Postby buddyjeff » Sun Mar 04, 2012 10:55 am

i made some mash and when i added the turbo yeast it did nothing. so i found out that the water was way to hot( about 130-140) when I added the yeast. so two days later i added another package of turbo yeast and this time the water was cold. on the first day( Friday) it did nothing no bubbles at all. then the next morning(Saturday) it was bubbling very slow now Sunday morning it was going crazy so i looked at the top (taking the cover off) and it was like a foam top and you could see the cornmeal in the foam and some redish tint is this mash bad or is it ok to distill in a week or so?
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Re: Cornmeal mash

Postby Usge » Sun Mar 04, 2012 12:28 pm

You can try and it and see. Turbo's are generally used for sugar based washes/ferments where there are little nutrients and high gravities. The turbo's included large amount of yeast and all sorts of nutrients, etc..that aren't really needed when you are using grains (which already provide nutrients, etc.). But, there are certainly people who still use them....or they wouldn't still be selling them like hotcakes.

Your ferment looks like it's fermenting very strongly. The only thing I can suggest is to leave it alone...and let it finish. Let it clear really well (to let all the suspended yeast, etc., fall out from suspension and settle), and then run it and see how it goes. If it works for you...more power to you. If it tastes like ass....you might try using different yeast. Plain ole bakers yeast seems to work fine for most people (and it's cheap). Just don't try and push the starting gravity (SG) too hard by adding too much sugar. (ie., 10% or less). Turbos (which are high gravity yeast packs that include nutrients, etc., to provide everything necessary), are typically used in high gravity sugar wash where you would need some kind of additional nutrient, and where 15% or better is the goal. They also can (and typically do) produce some off-flavors in the process of getting there...(which is why most of those same outfits also sell carbon filtering systems).
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Re: Cornmeal mash

Postby buddyjeff » Sun Mar 04, 2012 1:08 pm

I did use sugar. I did 5 gallons water and 13 pounds of sugar and 4 pounds of corn meal to one packet turbo yeast. What should it be or is this correct. This is my third time making mash. The first was not drinkable. The second was not so bad mixed with Apple juice or sugar free ice tea. I just found out couple of days ago that I am running way to hot, that's why im not getting high alcohol about 200-210 degrees almost boiling. I am getting 100 proof and 80 which is not too high but not bad. I though that when making this it would be about 150 or so.
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Re: Cornmeal mash

Postby rad14701 » Sun Mar 04, 2012 4:24 pm

That wash is gonna be nasty as hell due to a double dose of turbo yeast nutrients and cornmeal... I'd be surprised if it would even clean up with multiple passes through a reflux column...

As stated, turbo yeasts are intended for sugar only washes... Any cereal or grain washes or mashes should not have any turbo yeast added...

You might get lucky, which I doubt, but you really need to stop dicking around and head on over to the Tried and True Recipe forums and try one of those without deviation... There's no use in continuing to waste money, time, and effort playing with turbo yeast and other ingredients...
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Re: Cornmeal mash

Postby Usge » Sun Mar 04, 2012 4:41 pm

buddyjeff wrote:I did use sugar. I did 5 gallons water and 13 pounds of sugar and 4 pounds of corn meal to one packet turbo yeast. What should it be or is this correct. This is my third time making mash. The first was not drinkable. The second was not so bad mixed with Apple juice or sugar free ice tea. I just found out couple of days ago that I am running way to hot, that's why im not getting high alcohol about 200-210 degrees almost boiling. I am getting 100 proof and 80 which is not too high but not bad. I though that when making this it would be about 150 or so.
''

BuddyJeff...dont' know where you got that recipe from, but I'd do as Rad suggested and go check out some in the tried and true forum. Depending upon what you want to make...UJSM (Uncle Jessies Sour Mash) is a great recipe, doesn't require any cooking of the mash, uses common ingredients. You can use your cornmeal if you like. For 5 gals..try 7lbs of sugar. UJSM is (for 5 gals) 7lbs cracked corn, 7lbs sugar. You can use plain ole bakers yeast...it works just fine and it'll taste good right off the bat. It gets better as you recycle it and backmash it. Rad also has a couple good ones in there (All bran recipe). There's simple straight sugar washes if you want to make clean neutral or vodka that will give you better results as well. It's all over the proven recipe forum..so head out and take a look.

Secondly, you might want to read up in the theory section of the main site about boiling point/temps of alc and water. You can't control the boiling point on a potstill by the way you run the still. The boiling point of any mixture is somewhere in between the boiling point of the 2. The boiling point of water is 212F. The boiling point of Ethanol is 172F. So, the boiling point where vapor will start coming over on your potstill on any given run will be somewhere between 172 and 212F. If your starting still charge is higher in ethanol to start...the boiling point will start lower. If it's got more water than ethanol..the starting temp will be higher. Here's the important part, "as the run progresses" and alc is depleted from the mixture..there will be more and more water in the pot which will continually raise the boiling point of the mixture up and to it reaches boiling point of water.

So, the boiling point and starting proof of your distillate..is entirely determined by how much abv you start with in the pot. If you are applying reflux to it after the fact...then you have additional capabilties to play with things. But, for a straight through potstill....you can't control it. If you are running hot (ie., higher temps) it's not because you are using too much heat. It's because your still charge is low percent alc. What kind of still you using?
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Re: Cornmeal mash

Postby buddyjeff » Sun Mar 04, 2012 5:23 pm

Stainless steel pot. I also need as much info as possible because one day i just made a batch and that's why its coming out so bad. i guess I'm not getting the right info
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Re: Cornmeal mash

Postby Usge » Sun Mar 04, 2012 5:57 pm

Ok, so you are using a basic, straight up pot still. That's fine. Your arm coming up and over (column to lynearm) and your coil looks a bit small. This can limit how much througput your still has.

Try the UJSM recipe first..I think you'll like it. It's real easy to do, it's hard to muck up and it makes a nice drank. Work great with your still. Typical way to do this on a still like yours is to run it twice (double run it).
First time through as fresh fermented wash, you run it hard and fast. It's just a "stripping" run to reduce the volume and raise the proof. Try to let your fermented wash clear good before you strip it down. Let it set till the yeast all falls out and settles and the wash it golden and clear. On 5 gals of UJSM wash, you can expect to get back about 1 gal of low-wines at around 35% (aggregate abv).

After you've stripped down 4 or 5 washes, you'll have saved up enough "low-wines" for a "spirit run". Load low-wines to fill your still and run it off a 2nd time slower. Every still is different, but a good starting point for reference would be to adjust the heat "just" till it breaks into a stream after it gets going. It's gonna start at a drip, then speed up. Once it hits it's stride...turn down the heat till it drips. Then adjust the heat back up just till it starts to stream..and let it ride. It will slow as it goes ..particularly towards the end of the run. Collect everything in separate lots (tossing the first 150ml as you did). Try to use at least 10-12 jars to give you some idea of the progression of flavors you are going to be cutting from. Let it air for a couple days. Smell and taste the jars and blend together what you think tastes good. Water it down to drinking proof.

On a double run, you should get closer to you expect (ie, 150 proof). On single runs of wash, I usually blend out after cuts to around 100 to 120 proof. I've had some good runs both ways..so worth trying. But, you have to start with at least with a decent recipe. Who ever gave you that one..must have been making fuel.
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Re: Cornmeal mash

Postby buddyjeff » Sun Mar 04, 2012 6:19 pm

INDIAN HEAD CORN MEAL WHISKEY

Ingredients: 3 Lbs of Indian-Head corn meal 1 1/2- lbs dry malt preferably dark (available at most home-brew shops) 1- sachet of 48 turbo yeast 4- gallons of spring water

After cleaning the equipment to prep it for use, put 3 1/2 gallons of water into the carboy and then slowly add the cornmeal allowing it to wet as it falls to the bottom and thus avoids caking as much as possible. Carefully lift the carboy and shake it side-to-side to ensure a good mix. Next add the dry malt like you did the cornmeal,slow and steady and then lift the carboy up and shake it again to get a good mix Warm the 1/2 gallon of leftover water on the stove until it's just hot to the touch. Turn off the oven and stir in the yeast until it is completely dissolved. Now add this to the carboy and shake well. After 3 to 7 days, it's now ready to run off in the still.


That's from

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Re: Cornmeal mash

Postby Usge » Mon Mar 05, 2012 7:23 am

Where does it say to add 13lbs of sugar??

I know the Colonel well. I have a custom 5 gal pot he made for me and 2 of his heads. Those recipes on his site are mostly submissions by other people..etc. I can tell you right now that recipe wont' work..because who ever posted it there doesn't even have a basic understanding of what they are doing. This is a "mash" recipe, whereby sugars are produced from the grain itself...by using the enzymes in malt to convert the starches in the cornmeal. HOWEVER< this has to happen in a certain temp range...and you have to cook the corn meal first to get the starches out. Not only are they leaving this detail out, they have it confused with "yeast". They suggest heating the water (till you can just stick your finger in it) to add the "yeast". If you do this...you'll kill the yeast. Not to mention, what we first discussed about using "turbos" (for sugar washes) with an all grain mash. This is something obviously posted by someone else who was simply trying to repeat something they heard/saw from somewhere else...and got the details of it confused in the repeating of it. This is not uncommon. You'll find hundreds of "my grandpappy's recipe" all over the internet.

The difference between that, and our forum here is ..we don't just post recipes...but document people's experiences in trying it. Once enough people have tried it with success, THEN it moves to the proven recipe forum. And from there, as you can see...lots and lots of experiences and other people experimenting..what works, what doesn't, problems/issues with it, etc. Each recipe has a LONG list (pages upon pages) of people's experiences with it that documents all the nuances you might run into in trying to work that given recipe.

So, when we say..it's a proven recipe...you can be certain that enough people have tried it and had success..that the recipe is sound.
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Re: Cornmeal mash

Postby Dnderhead » Mon Mar 05, 2012 7:49 am

Ingredients: 3 Lbs of Indian-Head corn meal 1 1/2- lbs dry malt preferably dark (available at most home-brew shops) 1- sachet of 48 turbo yeast 4- gallons of spring water.

thats not going to work,or not very well.the first recipe using sugar for the fermentables.
but this one nothing ,the yeast has to brake down starch witch is a long proses.
you either have to mash or use sugar/other fermentables.
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Re: Cornmeal mash

Postby boda getta » Mon Mar 05, 2012 9:50 am

What Usge said, but
"After you've stripped down 4 or 5 washes, you'll have saved up enough "low-wines" for a "spirit run". Load low-wines to fill your still and run it off a 2nd time slower."

Be sure and dilute the low wines used in the spirit run down to 35% - 40% ABV before running.

Good luck,
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Re: Cornmeal mash

Postby Usge » Mon Mar 05, 2012 9:58 am

Yes..thank you boda. There certainly are more variables, safety issues, ie., things to read up on in that regard. Just trying to give you an overview so you'll have better idea areas to look at/research. Then a lot of this will make more sense. Dont' worry buddyjeff...you'll get there!
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Re: Cornmeal mash

Postby buddyjeff » Tue Mar 06, 2012 3:55 am

I guess what I'm not under standing is that you guys say sugar wash but that's what I have. Like I said I made one three weeks ago and not too bad. I use 5 lbs sugar 5 gal water and 4 lbs cornmeal and 4 oz bakers yeast and not too bad. I just want to make really moonshine wiskey thats what I'm aiming for.
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Re: Cornmeal mash

Postby Dnderhead » Tue Mar 06, 2012 6:28 am

"I guess what I'm not under standing is that you guys say sugar wash ""
a sugar wash is a ferment that uses sugar as its main fermentable ingredient.even if it has grain in the recipe.the grain is being used as flavoring and nutrient.
(technically sugar ferment is rum)

a mash is a ferment,made of grain, (raw)grain that is cooked ,converted with enzymes/malt.then fermented.
in the case of all malt,cooking is not needed,but a proses is.no sugar is allowed in "real whisky"

must is crushed fruit just as it is in wine. no sugar is allowed in real brandy so distillers use things like concentrated grape juice some place in their proses,on here we allow sugar "its your own"
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Re: Cornmeal mash

Postby Usge » Tue Mar 06, 2012 8:12 am

buddyjeff wrote:I did use sugar. I did 5 gallons water and 13 pounds of sugar and 4 pounds of corn meal to one packet turbo yeast. What should it be or is this correct. This is my third time making mash. The first was not drinkable. The second was not so bad mixed with Apple juice or sugar free ice tea. ........


I guess buddyjeff I'm a little confused too. What you are suggesting now (5lbs of sugar, 4lbs of cornmeal)...is different than what you posted previously...as you can see above. I can only give you advice on the information you post.

The issue here is sugar. Not that it's bad to use it in and of itself (there's lots of sugar recipes, etc)...but using TOO MUCH of it. 13lbs in 5 gals is too much sugar and would only be good for something like fuel. One lb per gal (as you now suggest) is more like it. So, lets first clear up a few terminology things that may help you understand things:

Mash: is (as Dnder says) when you use cooked grains for starch. Then you convert those starches to fermentable sugars by mashing in malted grain (usually barley malt) which has "enzymes". This is optimally done between 140-150F. In this case, the fermentable sugar comes directly from the grain itself. For flavor, this is the best you can do for a whiskey.

Wash: the sugar is directly added to produce the alcohol, and grains are used primarily for flavor. It is usually not cooked although sometimes the sugar is "inverted" by boiling it with some form of citric acid until it turns a straw color.

Thin-Mash: is sort of a combination of the 2. You do a smaller mash of grains, then add sugar and water to bring the starting gravity up to where you want.

So, what you are talking about is a "wash". And one of the best ones I know to get good whiskey flavor is UJSM (Uncle Jessie's Sour Mash). It's in our proven recipe's forum. It's not that different from what you are doing now, but we are going to add one element you may not be familiar with.

7lbs of cracked corn, 7lbs of sugar, to 5gals of water. Use plain old bakers yeast. Just mix it up, and let it go. The one thing you want to make sure of is you use good water. I filter mine to make sure no chlorine, etc in it. When it ferments out, it will clear and look like golden liquid sitting on top of all the trub in the bottom. Siphon or dip that out down to the corn bed. You'll see some of the used up corn turns dark. Scoop that out and replace it with as much as you scoop out. Put a couple gals water to cover your trub.

Now here's the basic sourmash/backmashing procedure: Run off your 5gals of wash down to 1 gal of low-wines. Save that. When your still cools a bit (but still good and warm), take 1 gallon of the left over slops in the still pot (the sour, smelly leftover stuff) and pour it in a bucket with your 7lbs of sugar. Melt the sugar good (add water if needed to dissolve it). Pour that in your fermenter, and top up the water back to 5 gals and give it all a good stir. No need to pitch anymore yeast. The yeast is still there on the bottom under your corn. It will take off again within a day. Each time you do this, you'll be adding flavor to each subsequent run. By the 3rd or 4th generation...it will be notable. The ferments smell great when they are done. It clears very well, and cooks up great. You can keep this going indefinitely by replacing the corn as you go, and make sure you don't use more than 1 gal of slops to backmash with. That's because it lowers ph and eventually could slow the ferment. Over time it will slow a bit, but churn along. If it gets too slow, do a couple rounds without backmashing just to get the ph back up.

Now, if you want to use "corn meal" instead, I'd do it a bit differently: First I'd use 5lbs of corn meal instead of 7lbs. Put that in the bottom of your fermenter and pour about 1 to 2 gallons of hot (almost boiling) water over it. Stir it up good till it gets thick. Let that sit open to air till it gets sour. (you'll know when..about a day). Pour hot water over it again and stir it up, break it up good. Pour in your 7lbs of sugar and stir it in good till it's all dissolved. Top it up with cold water. Make sure it's cool before pitching your yeast first round.
After that, just backmash it same as above. Add a handful of cornmeal or other grain (barley is good), etc..each round.
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Re: Cornmeal mash

Postby bigwheel » Tue Mar 06, 2012 10:29 pm

Wow this should be a sticky. I been wondering how to turn moonshine into sour mash. Now I am getting a clue or two. Thanks.
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Re: Cornmeal mash

Postby boda getta » Wed Mar 07, 2012 11:01 am

I'm not sure it was mentioned in this thread, but I think worth mentioning: In the typical grocery store a large part of what you will see in the cornmeal section is "cornmeal" mixes with all kinds of stuff added. I would suggest looking good and try to find a plain cornmeal, as close to just plain corn that has been been milled. There are also two schools of thought concerning if yellow or white are best. On a related note: Has anyone tried grits instead of cornmeal???

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Re: Cornmeal mash

Postby buddyjeff » Thu Mar 08, 2012 3:35 pm

Ok usge what kind of cracked corn should be used. I used turkey feed cracked corn and it came out horrible, it must of been like fuel. The very first batch I made was about 10 lbs cracked corn,1 cup bakers yeast,5 gals water and 5 lbs of sugar and about 210 degree which now I know was way too hot. Also you mentioned about not using sugar. How can I use the receipt you gave me and not use yeast use barley or something like that more natural.


That what I used
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Re: Cornmeal mash

Postby Usge » Fri Mar 09, 2012 1:39 pm

I've used producers pride. It can be a little dirty sometimes but is ok. The "first" thing you need to do is follow the recipe:

7lbs chops (cracked corn)
7lbs of sugar
5 gals of filtered water
bakers yeast

Try that first. THEN experiment. The first run is never all that good. It takes a few generations for the backmashing to catch up to it and start really bringing the flavor to it. Just follow the procedure and the recipe. Trust me, by the 3rd gen or so....your ferment will smell good. I've made this recipe with shit parrot feed cracked corn full of dirt and the corn smelled like plastic. First round stank. By the third one..it starts getting good.
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Re: Cornmeal mash

Postby buddyjeff » Sat Mar 10, 2012 7:20 am

Ok what do you mean by first round, just by collecting the liquid then put it back into the pot and running it again. I think that's what you mean. Just keep in mind I'm a beginner and also don't comprehend what I read so its a little hard for me to understand this process.

PS thanks everyone for the help can't wait to make another batch. I am running the one that I started last week this morning, hope it comes out good and not bad. I know now 180 tops and collect liquid then dump it back into the pot and collect more.
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Re: Cornmeal mash

Postby Usge » Sat Mar 10, 2012 11:58 am

2 different things:

The ferment:
When doing a sourmash (backmashing), you "cycle" the ferment. You don't just ferment one time, dump everything out and start over. You keep the corn, etc., that's in the ferment bucket, scoop out dead corn (dark corn), add fresh corn back, add the same recipe amount of sugar, your backset, and top with water. This makes it cycle or kick off again for round 2. As long as your replace the spent corn, you can keep this going for a long time.

Distillation:
STRIPPING RUN: first run is of your fermented wash from above. You run it hard and fast 5 gals down to about 1 gal. Put the 1 gal of "low-wines" aside. You take 1 gal of hotslops (soured left overs inside the pot) and use it to melt your sugar for cycling your ferment (above). This is your backmashing that gives the ferment a sour, tangy flavor (ie., sourmash). Everytime you run 5 gals of fermented wash from a cycle above, you'll strip it down to 1 gal of low-wines, untill you have 3 gals of low-wines. When you have saved up 3 gals of low-wines...proceed to the next run.

SPIRIT RUN: Put the 3 gals of low-wines in your pot and top to 5 gals. That should give you somewhere around 27% still charge. You want it under 30% to help it separate better and for safety. You can run as high as 40-45%, but if you want higher proof, but no higher for safety. If your fill the pot will 5 gals of low-wines from above...instead of 3 gals watered down, you'll have around 40%. Do this run somewhat slower. Turn heat up high. When you start to hear the pot coming alive, put your hand on the lyneam (between your pot and your condenser). When you feel that get warm, turn the heat back to a gentle simmer (thats different than "low"). Just listen to your pot. Make sure your condenser is on. After it starts coming out, adjust the heat back till it dribbles. Then turn it up just till it starts to "stream". Then let it go. OBSERVE when things change (ie, the stream starts, stops, etc). These can be indications of different fractions/points. Make note of them (ie., jar 5 it stopped, then started again).

As far as my previous comment about first round goes....I meant the first round or cycle of the UJSM ferment (UJSM stands for Uncle Jessies Sour Mash). You need to settle down, and stick to ONE recipe/method till you get some experience. You seem to be all over the place. Use the recipe I gave you and don't modify it (ie., using 10lbs of corn instead of 7, etc). Follow it "exactly" as it's written for a few times. Then,you'll have something to gauge whatever else you try after on.
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Re: Cornmeal mash

Postby buddyjeff » Sat Mar 10, 2012 6:18 pm

Sounds great can't wait to try it.

Ok I think I'm really having a heat problem. I have a normal gas stove but when the temp is about 180 the copper arm going to the worm is not hot. I turned up the heat to 200 or a bit over. I think I
may know what's going on with the heat but not too sure. My burner is a lot smaller than the bottom of the pan, so I'm thinking that the heat is not circulating properly.

CLICK ON PICTURE TO REALLY SEE THE SIZE
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Re: Cornmeal mash

Postby Usge » Sat Mar 10, 2012 8:09 pm

Ignore the temp markings on stove. Turn the the heat on high/full (as in all the way up as far as it will go without clicking the ignitor). Leave it on high/full out until your pot starts to make boiling sounds. Now start to check your copper tube. When you feel it start to get hot..turn the heat down to about 1/2 it's max. Wait. It will eventually start to drip off. Watch for it to catch to a stream. If it doesn't get to a stream..turn the heat up. If it does catch a stream...adjust it back down still it dribbles....then back up till it streams. Once you get that set...leave it there.
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Re: Cornmeal mash

Postby buddyjeff » Mon Mar 12, 2012 6:57 am

Oh ok so the temp being 200 is not a big deal good I got out one mason jar at 136 proof and about 1 cup of 150 proof I stopped and didn't keep going I think that's pretty good know if I want higher proof I should of dump that back into the pot and it would of had better flavor and proof
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Re: Cornmeal mash

Postby Usge » Mon Mar 12, 2012 12:42 pm

buddyjeff...slow down! before you hurt yourself or somebody else.

First..congrats on your run! You got some distillate.

Important: DO NOT put 60-75% alc in your pot and re-run it! You are just asking for it. (it's like boiling gasoline). Water it down to at "LEAST" 40-45% before rerunning it.

That out of the way, let me see if I can answer your other questions/concerns:

Yes, you can run it again. The the more times you run it...it will have less and less flavor. (until you get like a vodka).
If you want flavor...single or double run with good cuts is the way. (or a mix of the 2..by running a mixture of low-wines and wash).

In general, the higher the proof, the less flavor you get. It's a different, lighter flavor. The lower the proof, the more flavor it will have and you won't have to water the piss out of it to get it down to drinking proof.

Start out with higher % low-wines (40-45%) if you want to make vodka or higher-proof, lighter tasting distillate. If you want better flavor, water your low-wines down to under 30% (27%). This sill still give you higher proof, cleaner distillate than your first run on 10% wash, but will have more flavor and tend to be smoother.
You need to learn about "cuts" as well, and why they are important. (see the reading lounge).
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Re: Cornmeal mash

Postby buddyjeff » Mon Mar 12, 2012 2:38 pm

Ok will do but what do you mean by low-wines I don't really know what that is
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Re: Cornmeal mash

Postby Usge » Mon Mar 12, 2012 8:18 pm

buddy, look up a few posts. See my post on the two runs (first STRIPPING RUN:), then SPIRIT RUN?

The stripping run, is what makes your Low-wines. Low-wines are when you take your fermented wash/mash and distill it fast/hard just to reduce it down (to concentrate it) before running it again.
Your typical wash/mash is 8 to 10%. Lowwines would be 30-40% and since it's already distilled once..it's clean/clear, etc. This is standard procedure for potstill runs and can make it your yields much higher and cuts easier.

Here's something to think about: your still doen'st "make" alcohol. It just extracts or condenses it into smaller volumes of liquid. That's what makes the proof higher. It's the same exact amount of alc you started with only in a smaller volume (hence higher concentration)

Example: 18927ml (5 gal) x .10 = 1,892.7 ml of potential (100%) alc. 3785.4ml (1 gal) of .50 = 1.8927 (same thing, only higher proof in less volume).

It's the same 10% you started with, only extracted at higher concentration. Now, of course, this is theoretical. Our stills can't extract alc at 100% purity and most people also don't run things all the way down to zero % alc. So, given that...commonly what you'll find is..on a 5 gal still charge of "wash" or mash, (10%), it will strip down ( or reduce) to about 1 gal of 35% (give or take).

Loading our still with low-wines instead of wash, increases the amount of alc available in your pot and will raise the overall proof what you collect on a second run (the spirit run). So, basically, its a preperation run done on each new ferment, until you have enough of them to charge the still with low-wines. Precautions are: you don't want to let your low-wines get above 40%. This becomes a little too flammable to be safe. (like boiling gasoline)
So, if for some reason your low-wines are higher proof (usually because you stopped too early), you'll want to water them down. For best flavor results..water them down to below 30%...which gives a good compromise between proof and flavor.
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Re: Cornmeal mash

Postby rad14701 » Wed Mar 14, 2012 6:10 am

buddyjeff, the short answer to your questions is to park your rig and do what we consider mandatory research... You should be grateful that Usge and others have taken the time to answer some very basic questions and addressed some serious concerns, but you should have already known these things before you ever attempted to operate your still... What this leads us to wonder is what else is there that you don't know that could seriously injure or kill you...

We are fully aware that people don't like to be told to slow down, but that's what you need to hear, not necessarily what you want to hear... Slow down and get a firm grip on the basic theories before proceeding... It'll make things easier for all of us and will vastly reduce the number of frustrating mistakes you'll otherwise make... This is a lifetime hobby, not a race... :thumbup:
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Re: Cornmeal mash

Postby buddyjeff » Wed Mar 14, 2012 7:24 pm

i agree 100%. i did view a lot of videos on you tube and did some reading, like i said in the past. i don't really comprehend what i read. i also thought i knew what i was doing, but from all the help I'm getting here i guess not. This is my whole procedure, first i clean everything then rinse real good, then i make up a mash, last run was 13 lbs sugar and 5 gallons water, and 4 lbs cornmeal and one packet of turbo yeast. Let ferment (sit) for 7-10 days, then when done i strained the cornmeal out of the liquid, then dump the liquid into the pot still, then i turned the heat up and down until it starts to come out, on my last run i only collected about a cup of 150 proof and one whole mason jar chuck full of 136 proof, then i drank it and this last run tasted pretty good compared to the past two i ran.

P.S. sorry for punctuation
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Re: Cornmeal mash

Postby white_likker1 » Fri Mar 16, 2012 9:13 am

buddyjeff wrote: i did view a lot of videos on you tube

Thats where the problem lies. I also watched youtube videos before coming here. But as you can tell, most videos on youtube are made by hacks and are far from the correct way of doing things. The guys that have been answering your posts are experts in this field and always want safety first. As they suggested slow down and read. Start here http://homedistiller.org/ this is a very good resource for the beginner. I keep going there to read weekly. Be safe.
Chew on this: In 1920 During Prohibition, President Harding kept the White House well stocked with bootleg liquor.
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