How to corn mash?

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How to corn mash?

Postby Frito » Fri Feb 22, 2008 10:44 am

I know this has been discussed. I've read most of the info on the parent site, though it is a little unorganzied (sorry!). I've also searched through the forums and see a lot of questions on specific things.

I've done a number of all grain mashes for beer and even an all malt whiskey or 2. I'm a little nervous about doing a 75% corn mash. I've got the 10 gallon water cooler with false bottom, spigot and even a counterflow wort chiller. I've got buckets to ferment in. I've got a nice big SS strainer. I don't have a filter bag.

I guess I'm wondering if I should even use the water cooler for my mash. Sounds like you want to simmer the corn for 30 minutes and then add to mash tun with grain and then mash like normal (also adding enzymes I would guess at this time). I

wonder if my false bottom will allow me to strain the wort off the grain/corn or if it will get stuck.

Should I just pour it all including the grain into my fermenting bucket and ferment on the grain?

If I do this, how do I ensure that I will end up with 5 gallons of fermented liquid at the end and not, say 2.5 or 3 gallons?

What is the benefit of fermenting on the grain? I'm not clear on that. Does the grain continue to mash during fermentation?

Can I just pour all this stuff in my large-ish strainer and sparge that way?

So many questions. I guess I'll just give it a go today. thanks

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Postby wineo » Fri Feb 22, 2008 11:00 am

Most people ferment on the grain.Theres no need to do the sparge if you plan on doing this.Dont do the mash out stage either.You want those enzymes to be still active in the fermenter.You will have to cook the corn first.The gelitinazition temp for corn is 180f.Be careful not to scortch it,and if you do,start over because that flavor will carry over.Use your cooler for mashing,but just dump the whole thing in your fermenter when its done.If you are using 5 gallon buckets,You may want to use 2 of them and split 1/2 the mash in each bucket so you will have enough room to get the amount of finished mash that you want.The corn needs to be cooked enough to turn to goo for best conversion,but if you dont get it cooked that good,You will still get alot of corn flavor.Add enough sugar to get a starting SG of 1070-1080,and ferment away!You can just rack it out of the fermenter when your done.Use a tip on your racking cane to keep it off the bottom,and the grain bed will act as a filter once you get it going.You can strain out the little bits that get through with a funnel and a screen.
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Postby Frito » Fri Feb 22, 2008 11:03 am

sweet. Gonna get.. ahem... cracking today. thanks!
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Re: How to corn mash?

Postby cannon.co.tn » Thu Mar 06, 2008 7:18 pm

Frito wrote:I guess I'm wondering if I should even use the water cooler for my mash. Sounds like you want to simmer the corn for 30 minutes and then add to mash tun with grain and then mash like normal (also adding enzymes I would guess at this time).


That is exactly what you want to do. Also, doing the iodine test is helpful as usual.


Frito wrote: I wonder if my false bottom will allow me to strain the wort off the grain/corn or if it will get stuck.

Should I just pour it all including the grain into my fermenting bucket and ferment on the grain?


no need for the false bottom. Just ferment on the grains. This will allow the conversion to continue during fermentation as mentioned above. It will also ensure that all of the sugar gets fermented, no need to worry about efficiency.

Frito wrote:If I do this, how do I ensure that I will end up with 5 gallons of fermented liquid at the end and not, say 2.5 or 3 gallons?


use 5 gallons of water plus whatever your grain absorption rate and you'll be good to go. Remember, unlike beer this is not your final product so if you're a little low in alcohol it will only cost you a little more propane/electricity during distillation, it won't adversely effect the end product. Most folks feel the quality is better with lower alcohol content because you aren't stressing the yeast.

Frito wrote:What is the benefit of fermenting on the grain? I'm not clear on that. Does the grain continue to mash during fermentation?

yes, they continue to convert and you won't be leaving ANY sugars behind so it will ALL be available during fermentation. Also, the less viscous fermented mash is more easily removed from the grain leaving less total waste as well.
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