I-Vac control box as coolant pump safety device

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I-Vac control box as coolant pump safety device

Postby hpby98 » Tue Nov 14, 2017 8:15 am

For those running a 110v coil, what about running an I-Vac switch. When the cooling pumps running, it enables the element.

If there’s no load on the pump side the element automagically gets cut off

http://ivacswitch.com/ivac-switch/

Just an extra level of safety....?.

Technical spec’s:

• Operates from one or two 115Vac 15 Amp mains circuits.
• Power Tool receptacle: rated at 115Vac 15Amps, limited by a 15Amp circuit breaker. Click here to view our technical note on current ratings.
• Vacuum Receptacle: 115Vac. Dust Collector should not exceed 1HP or 5 Peak HP, limited by a 15Amp circuit breaker.
• Turn On Delay (In Auto Mode.) 0.5 seconds to 2.0 seconds.
• Turn Off Delay (In Auto Mode.) Approximately 6.0 seconds.
• Turn On Tool Current threshold in Auto Mode. 0.3 Amps.
• Plastic housing is 4.625” x 4.625” x 1.875” (11.7cms x 11.7 cms x 4.7 cms )
• Housing Material ABS 94VO
• Tool Power Cord 54” (137cms.)
• Vacuum Power Cord 19.5” (50 cms.)
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Re: I-Vac control box as coolant pump safety device

Postby zach » Tue Nov 14, 2017 9:09 am

An energized pump does not always produce flow.

A flow switch would be a better safety if you're trying to avoid running the element when there is no flow.

No amount of automation will replace the need to be close to your still and paying attention during operation.
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Re: I-Vac control box as coolant pump safety device

Postby BugHunter » Tue Nov 14, 2017 10:44 am

zach wrote:No amount of automation will replace the need to be close to your still and paying attention during operation.


True, but an extra safety factor certainly doesn't hurt. In one former job, I made a mistake which caused a release to be late. I proposed a change to the process to make that particular mistake to be impossible to make. My tech lead's response was that I should just be more careful. "Be more careful" is never an acceptable safety policy if there is a practical way to prevent a dangerous situation.

I've got a similar switch that I use to turn on/off my shop vacc connected to my table saw, and it's great for that application. I expect it would also be great for ensuring that your coolant pump whenever you start heating your boiler.

I think mine is the i-Socket, which is about half the price.

Of course, it only works if you have a 110v plug-in heater on your boiler, and if you have a 110v pump running your coolant. Those who have 220v heaters, or use gas, or use a stove, or use a faucet/hose for cooling water will not be able to use this. So it's not a solution for everybody. But for those who can use it, it seems like a good idea. And it is also darned useful to have around if you do any woodworking.
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Re: I-Vac control box as coolant pump safety device

Postby hpby98 » Tue Nov 14, 2017 12:08 pm

I agree - just an extra safety just in case

It's probably more $$ than the other one as it can support two 15 amp devices - both your tool and your vacuum, giving much over head


BugHunter wrote:
zach wrote:No amount of automation will replace the need to be close to your still and paying attention during operation.


True, but an extra safety factor certainly doesn't hurt. In one former job, I made a mistake which caused a release to be late. I proposed a change to the process to make that particular mistake to be impossible to make. My tech lead's response was that I should just be more careful. "Be more careful" is never an acceptable safety policy if there is a practical way to prevent a dangerous situation.

I've got a similar switch that I use to turn on/off my shop vacc connected to my table saw, and it's great for that application. I expect it would also be great for ensuring that your coolant pump whenever you start heating your boiler.

I think mine is the i-Socket, which is about half the price.

Of course, it only works if you have a 110v plug-in heater on your boiler, and if you have a 110v pump running your coolant. Those who have 220v heaters, or use gas, or use a stove, or use a faucet/hose for cooling water will not be able to use this. So it's not a solution for everybody. But for those who can use it, it seems like a good idea. And it is also darned useful to have around if you do any woodworking.
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Re: I-Vac control box as coolant pump safety device

Postby hpby98 » Tue Nov 14, 2017 12:09 pm

Noted, but it's still better to have something as a secondary safety than nothing


zach wrote:An energized pump does not always produce flow.

A flow switch would be a better safety if you're trying to avoid running the element when there is no flow.

No amount of automation will replace the need to be close to your still and paying attention during operation.
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Re: I-Vac control box as coolant pump safety device

Postby NZChris » Tue Nov 14, 2017 3:09 pm

A latched relay and a simple controller reading the condenser outlet temperature can shut the still down for any event that causes vapor to exit the condenser. Once that is set up, other switches can be daisy chained into the circuit, dead man timer, boiler temperature, boiler pressure, whatever takes your fancy.
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Re: I-Vac control box as coolant pump safety device

Postby hpby98 » Tue Nov 14, 2017 4:10 pm

NZChris wrote:A latched relay and a simple controller reading the condenser outlet temperature can shut the still down for any event that causes vapor to exit the condenser. Once that is set up, other switches can be daisy chained into the circuit, dead man timer, boiler temperature, boiler pressure, whatever takes your fancy.


You know, it *sounds* like you're speakin de english but some of us are simple when it comes to this stuff...
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Re: I-Vac control box as coolant pump safety device

Postby NZChris » Wed Nov 15, 2017 12:38 am

hpby98 wrote:
NZChris wrote:A latched relay and a simple controller reading the condenser outlet temperature can shut the still down for any event that causes vapor to exit the condenser. Once that is set up, other switches can be daisy chained into the circuit, dead man timer, boiler temperature, boiler pressure, whatever takes your fancy.


You know, it *sounds* like you're speakin de english but some of us are simple when it comes to this stuff...

It is less complicated than what you suggested in your OP, so I assumed you would understand it. Have a talk to the electrician you were intending to use to install your proposal.
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Re: I-Vac control box as coolant pump safety device

Postby BugHunter » Wed Nov 15, 2017 8:09 am

No electrician required for either the i-Vac in the OP or the i-Socket I suggested. You plug the box into the wall, plug the boiler into the "tool" socket and plug the pump into the "vacuum" socket. Whenever the boiler is turned on, the box detects current flow and automatically turns on the pump. Very simple.
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Re: I-Vac control box as coolant pump safety device

Postby hpby98 » Wed Nov 15, 2017 8:42 am

BugHunter wrote:No electrician required for either the i-Vac in the OP or the i-Socket I suggested. You plug the box into the wall, plug the boiler into the "tool" socket and plug the pump into the "vacuum" socket. Whenever the boiler is turned on, the box detects current flow and automatically turns on the pump. Very simple.


Exactly why I am interested in this to start with
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