using glycerin ?

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Safegyde
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using glycerin ?

Post by Safegyde » Thu Feb 28, 2008 7:50 am

Hello shiners. I met an old moonshiner a few weeks ago and he was putting glycerin in everything. Said it makes it all come together. (of course he also said that "inverting sugar don't do shit" and he mixed some home made merlot with an awesome whiskey to make a "brandy", personally I think he just ruined the whiskey!!! :lol: )

But anyway, is that glycerin a good idea to invest in? I have a corn whiskey aging on some toasted hickory right now and while it tastes O.K. I can't help but think that I could add some glycerin to help it mellow out a tad. Anyone do this??

Can I make my own glycerin?? Melted sugar in water??
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Post by Dnderhead » Thu Feb 28, 2008 9:13 am

glycerin is a sugar that is not sweet it will give body to drinks
i do not thank I would want in whisky I would say in things like brandy
or fruit flavored drinks and no I do not thank you can make it
some people use Carmel that you can make adds Collier , body
but is sweet

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Post by BW Redneck » Thu Feb 28, 2008 9:25 am

Glycerin is not even produced from sugar. It's produced by treating a triglyceride with a strong alkali to break glycerin off of its fatty acids. Glycerin is a common byproduct of soap and biodiesel production. This link has more information.
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Post by Husker » Thu Feb 28, 2008 9:51 am

Actually, glycerin is a "heavy" alcohol.

In simplistic terms, when you make biodiesel, you strip off this heavy alcohol from the oil molecule, and replace it with a light alcohol (3 actually since you work with 'tri' glycerides). Methanol works great, for this "light" alcohol, but ethanol "can" be used but is much harder to get to work right.

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Post by Dnderhead » Thu Feb 28, 2008 10:31 am

I'm not a chemist but from my research "glycerin" is a carbohydrate"
made from vegetable oil I thank alcohol is also a form of carbohydrate.
not sugar that is used on the table

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Post by autoworker » Thu Feb 28, 2008 3:23 pm

Food Lover's Companion: glycerin; glycerine

[GLIH-ser-ihn] The commercial name for glycerol, a colorless, odorless, syrupy liquid-chemically, an alcohol-obtained from fats and oils and used to retain moisture and add sweetness to foods. It also helps prevent sugar crystallization in foods like candy. Outside the world of food, glycerin is used in cosmetics, inks and certain glues.

Dictionary:
glycerol
(glĭs'ə-rôl', -rōl') pronunciation

n.

A syrupy, sweet, colorless or yellowish liquid, C3H8O3, obtained from fats and oils as a byproduct of saponification and used as a solvent, an antifreeze, a plasticizer, and a sweetener and in the manufacture of dynamite, cosmetics, liquid soaps, inks, and lubricants.

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Post by Dnderhead » Thu Feb 28, 2008 4:12 pm

I thank this is what they mean by getting off topic
Safegyde wanted to know if it was a good idea to add to whisky
my answer is no maybe brandy and fruit drinks , to add body
I do not thank he cares if it is made out of moon dust

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Post by junkyard dawg » Thu Feb 28, 2008 5:03 pm

I don't like glycerine in anything...

I've tried it, and its pretty obvious in everything. It just adds a 'fake' quality that I don't care for. I never felt it helped anything. I do think you should try it for yourself, just so you can see. I want my stuff to be good without any 'additives' or 'smoothers'.

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Post by Dnderhead » Thu Feb 28, 2008 5:16 pm

Thanks junkyard Four getting back on topic and i agree with you.
the only thing i was saying was i do not thank it has Anny place in
whisky at all if i was to use it it wold be in some fruit drink to add body

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Post by goose eye » Thu Feb 28, 2008 5:32 pm

itll save you from firein up your ketle if you kill your bead.
only takes few drops per galon
these boys i no aint never used it.


some folks call it beadin oil


so im tole

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Post by The Chemist » Fri Feb 29, 2008 7:36 am

All good answers.

You can usually find glycerol in a drug store. Even my local food store has it in the drug aisle.

Glycerine, glycerol, 1,2,3-trihydroxypropane...it's all the same stuff...
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Post by Husker » Fri Feb 29, 2008 9:13 am

goose eye wrote:itll save you from firein up your ketle if you kill your bead.
only takes few drops per galon
these boys i no aint never used it.

some folks call it beadin oil

so im tole
So beadin oil is simply glycerin (glycerol). I would figure it would leave enough flavor that it could be detected. Must be just a little tiny bit of glycerin to get the proper bubbles to "fool" the bubble (bead) test.

H.

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Post by goose eye » Sat Mar 01, 2008 4:23 am

these boys i no dont no of no folks that adin it for flaverin or
such just beadin.


how much that likker dick say he was putin per jug.
get a tester an ck his likker bet it round 70 mite be 60s.
what some folks do is ad alot of suger so it will turn out alot
but it will be hot - that what they lookin - so they can take it down
where it wont bead but got a bite. some folks think since it bites
an it beads then it good.
you can put a flaver in some folks head. if it got a fruit flavor then if folks is lookin peach then it peach if they lookin apple then it apple if they
lookin blackberry then it blackberry. this aint gonna work on old likker dicks
so dont try it.

so im tole

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Post by Tater » Sat Mar 01, 2008 5:50 am

Off tonys sight==Aging Spirit
To round out or smooth the flavour of your liqueur or commercially flavoured drinks, it often pays to artifically age your drinks.

When aging your spirit, it is best done between 58-70% alcohol.

This can be done using :

* woods - eg natural or toasted oak, and
* smoothing agents - eg glucose or glycerine syrups.

Hexenwolfe explains that glycerine is safe ...

Glycerine is a naturally occuring organic molecule that is manufactured by all animals. It is a major part of the animal fats known as triglycerides. Almost all animal fats such as lard, beef fat (tallow), mutton fat and other hard fats are triglycerides. These fats are called tri-glycerides because each molecule is made up of one glycerine molecule to which is attached three fatty acid molecules. A mono, or di glyceride fat such as is found in vegetable fats contains either one fatty acid molecule, or two fatty acids respectively.

Glycerine itself is a molecule made of three connected carbon atoms, with an OH or hydroxl group at one end. This makes it an organic alcohol by classification. This also gives glycerine it's other name of glycerol. Either name is valid.

Glycerine is a natural byproduct of the soap making process. When a triglyceride fat is reacted with lye, the fatty acids are broken away from the glycerol molecule. The end product is three molecules of soap and one leftover molecule of glycerine. This glycerine molecule is valuable so it is recovered from the soap and used in many ways.

Pure glycerine is a clear, oily liquid with a very sweet taste. Think of mineral oil that tastes like honey. Another common name for glycerine is "sweet oil". Glycerine is not digestable by the human body. The oily texture, and sugary taste make it valuable as a calorie free food additive. It is used in MANY foods both regular and those intended for diabetics. Glycerine is also used in many industrial products. Undoubtedly the most famous use of glycerine is the explosive nitroglycerine. If a nitrogen atom is attached to each of carbon atoms in the glycerine backbone, then you have the explosive. Another famous use of glycerine is in cosmetics. The "oil" in "Oil of Olay" is glycerine. Many hand lotions use glycerine mixed with mineral oil and a little lanolin. The most well known in America is "Corn Huskers lotion".

Moonshiners in the mountains of the USA called glycerine "Beading oil". A few drops of glycerine added to low proof moonshine would cause the moonshine to form "beads" around the edge of the jar like those created when high proof liquor is shaken. The sweet taste also concealed the harshness of poor quality moonshine. Glycerine is available from most brewing shops as a finishing agent for wines. It is also available at pharmacies for use as a sweetener or in compounding medicines.

Glycerine is a completely safe and 100% natural compound.

Smoothing Agents
Using a non-sweet aging syrup can mellow out your spirit, without having to store it away for years. Just don't use too much to kill the character of whiskeys.

Try 20g/L of glucose, or 5 mL per litre of glycerine as a starter.
Other Tricks

Other little tricks to help round out/mature your whiskey include adding:

* a tad of orange flavour [essence], and/or
* a bit of sherry (at 1-5% by volume, and Cream Sherry is said to be best), and/or
* a bit of port, and/or
* a smidgeon of bourbon, and/or
* a tiny tiny amount of honey.


Manuka honey at 1 tablespoon per 1125 mL nicely rounds at the Drambuie type flavours.

Soak raisins and/or prunes in some 70% alcohol for a while, then add to brandy.
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goose eye
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Post by goose eye » Sun Mar 02, 2008 4:17 am

ole doc could get cough syrup beadin like 100 proof just a messin round.
an that aint easy.

you getin it gone clear you got to go easy on it cause i been tole the flaver will come across but suger mostly stays in the ketle an ole likker dicks gonna want to no why that likker sweet. with a bite itll mostly hide that sweet.


aint sure where tony from but you gota no your market
so im tole

i aint never made no likker an dont plan on it in the future im
just a sayin what i been tole.

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Post by smokerscully1 » Sun Mar 02, 2008 7:17 am

goose--you sure seem to remember much of what you been tole! Thank You.

Safegyde
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Post by Safegyde » Mon Mar 03, 2008 12:32 pm

Thanks guys for your input. That old fart was putting in nearly half a cup for a liter of hooch. Still tasted fine, I wonder about the strength though.

Have fun ole timer. :lol:
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Post by goose eye » Tue Mar 04, 2008 5:15 am

1 gal wiskey 20 -30 dollars
1 gal brandy 80 - 100 dollars

if his wiskey was round 95 to start ad wine that droped it then 4 oz of beadin oil to that. 60 proof. see if he will let you float your tester if not touch it. how it feel.

so im tole

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