same overall odor regadless of alcohol percentage or wash.

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barrelcreator
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same overall odor regadless of alcohol percentage or wash.

Post by barrelcreator » Sat Mar 29, 2008 8:18 am

Okay I have ran my reflux still to collect up to 93%. I've ran it at 60% detuned and everywhere in between. Ive made rum, whiskey, sugar washes, juice washes, wine washes, tequila, etc.

I seem to get the same overall odor off all the batches. WHAT IS IT???

The only thing I can think of is I have used turbo destillers yeast in all the runs. Some I have siphoned off the lees and some I have just dumped the whole wash in and ran with it. I really want to make a great whiskey and rum and although they have a stlight flavor associated with the wash, there is this odor on all of them. The same odor if I run the still neutral at 92%.

The only two constants are the still its self and the yeast I am using. I am running at the right temps for each style, my cuts are understood and correct and I don't see any obvious answer to my problem.

hI am seriously thinking about building a pot still head for my keg pot to see if I can go that route and get a better flavored product but without this ODOR. My question really is.

Is it the still, or is it the yeast. My eyes are falling out of my head reading and trying to find the answer so I was hoping anyone could offer some advise. Thanks.

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Tater
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Post by Tater » Sat Mar 29, 2008 8:23 am

dump the turbo yeast
I use a pot still.Sometimes with a thumper

Uncle Jesse
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yep

Post by Uncle Jesse » Sat Mar 29, 2008 8:29 am

I agree, try a better yeast. Drop your specific gravity and try it with bakers yeast and see if you get the same result.

In distillation it's really not worth your while to push your mashes up into higher proofs just to get more product, people often make this mistake.
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barrelcreator
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Post by barrelcreator » Sat Mar 29, 2008 8:33 am

Tater. I knew it, and I was on my way to the copper store to buy the material to build the new head right before yu replied.

Thanks for the reply and advise. Do you suggest an alternative? Red star bakers yeast was my thought as a default from here on out. I have yeast nutrients "superfood" and DAP to help feed the washes if needed.

If my reading has been right the sugeested recipe for success with bakers yeast would be

Apprx. 21 grams to a 20L wash at 24brix (12% potential alcohol) should do the trick right? I would probably add a tsp of superfood nutrient just to help feed and fatten up the little critters.


I am very knwledged in wine yeasts and the process of rehydrating, feeding and ensuring a strong fermentation in wine but bakers yeast is a whole new unexplored world for me. Does the bakers yeast need to by rehydrated before just dumping it in? Hence the reason I went with the turbos to begin with.

barrelcreator
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Post by barrelcreator » Sat Mar 29, 2008 8:36 am

Thanks also for the advise Jesse. I have a turbo yeast batch of "JD" recipe whiskey finishing up. I was going to sour mash into the next but on this one I will use the bakers yeast. I can compare the difference and post the results to prove out the theory. Hopefully helping the next guy with this question.

Oh yeah and run the washes at lower percentages. Like the idea and have the room to do more so why not right. :idea:

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Post by Tater » Sat Mar 29, 2008 9:16 am

I use reg distillers yeast in warm weather and ec 1118 in cool weather.I think the distillers does better with rums and grains and ec1118 does great in fruits.But use both for either and have mixed them .Also used reg bakers yeast when out of others.Both the above give a tad more proof then bakers. But with good ferment all have a pleasant taste if theres any from yeast it good tasting to me.Lots of yeast out there plus what ya can catch wild.Decide what ya wanna make and check out yeasts thats usually used for smiler products a good as way as any.Temperature tolerance of yeast should be a deciding factor as well.
I use a pot still.Sometimes with a thumper

wineo
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Post by wineo » Sat Mar 29, 2008 10:37 am

You cant get rid of that turbo twang no matter how many times you reflux it.I also mostly use distillers yeast,and 1118,and whiskey distillers yeast on grains.Go with a lower gravity wash and you will be much happier.Most of my ferments are in the 1060-1080SG range.Get you some superstart distillers yeast by crosby and baker.Its a real bargin at $8 bucks a pound,and is good on about everything.If you do fruit,use a wine yeast.

barrelcreator
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Post by barrelcreator » Sat Mar 29, 2008 12:39 pm

Finally I have an answer... Thanks guys for the help. Wineo, My next step was to redistill it to see if it would go away. Sounds like It won't work. Thanks guys. :) :)

BW Redneck
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Post by BW Redneck » Sat Mar 29, 2008 12:39 pm

I've found that an ale yeast does really good in grain-based mashes. My favorite (well, the only one I've tried :roll: :oops: ) is Nottingham Ale like the one shown here.
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theholymackerel
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Post by theholymackerel » Sat Mar 29, 2008 2:27 pm

BW Redneck wrote:I've found that an ale yeast does really good in grain-based mashes. My favorite (well, the only one I've tried :roll: :oops: ) is Nottingham Ale like the one shown here.
BW redneck got it right.

Ale yeast rocks in a low abv (8ish %) whiskey mash. Nice and flavorful yet smooth.

Also to get better flavors try filterin' yer water first and goin' for a lower ABV%.








I wish ya luck.

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Post by Old_Blue » Sat Mar 29, 2008 2:27 pm

BC,

Yeast is the cheapest ingredient in a batch besides water and it pays off to experiment to find something to your liking.

If you will learn to do a little yeast farming it becomes free except for the time. You can even collect wild yeast and do it like it was done before the store bought was available.

Each has its own characteristics. Ale strains are even available in commercially produced beer. Go to the grocery store and look at the so called specialty beers (they're not really specialty - thats another story). Take a bottle out of the pack and hold it up and look for sediment on the bottom. Thats yeast. Ignore the funny looks from the clerks and other customers. A little time and patience will build a starter out of this stuff. I have several strains I use that was culled from this method.

I've got my own "hillbilly strains" that have mutated over time into stuff you can't get in a store.

Another rewarding chapter in this adventure if you want to invest the time.
Fire is the devil’s only friend - Don McLean
Jump in where you can and hang on - Brisco Darling

barrelcreator
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Post by barrelcreator » Sat Mar 29, 2008 4:15 pm

All great advise. Because of the feedback, Im on a mission to run different yeasts through every wash i do in the next couple of months. With all the experience i should have a better understanding of whats avaiable and what complements what. Thanks again guys.

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