Red Star Brand Yeast Quick Reference List

These little beasts do all the hard work. Share how to keep 'em happy and working hard.

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Red Star Brand Yeast Quick Reference List

Post by EuroStiller » Sun Jan 09, 2011 9:11 am

Red Star® Montrachet (Davis 522), a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been derived from the collection of the University of California. This strain has been widely used in the U.S. since 1963. It is a strong fermenter with good ethanol tolerance, and will readily ferment grape musts and fruit juices to dryness. This strain also has good tolerance to free sulfur dioxide. This strain is recommended for full bodied reds and whites. It is not recommended for grapes that have recently been dusted with sulfur, because of a tendency to produce hydrogen sulfide in the presence of higher concentrations of sulfur compounds. Montrachet is noted for low volatile acidity, good flavor complexity, and intense color.


Red Star® Pasteur Champagne (Davis 595), a strain of Saccharomyces bayanus, has been derived from a pure culture slant of the Institut Pasteur in Paris. This strain has been widely used in the U.S. since 1968. It is a strong fermenter with good ethanol tolerance, and will readily ferment grape musts and fruit juices to dryness. This strain also has good tolerance to free sulfur dioxide. This strain is recommended for all white wines, some reds and for fruit juices. Although this yeast is somewhat flocculant, it is not commonly used for sparkling wine. Pasteur Champagne has been recommended, by several sources, for restarting stuck fermentations. Ferments best between 15-30 deg. C, (59-86 deg. F).


Red Star® Côte des Blancs (Davis 750), a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been derived from a selection of the Geisenheim Institute in Germany. It is a relatively slow fermenter, identical to Geisenheim Epernay, but producing less foam. This yeast requires nutrient addition for most chardonnay fermentations. Côte des Blancs produces fine, fruity aromas and may be controlled by lowering temperature to finish with some residual sugar. It is recommended for reds, whites, sparkling cuvées and non-grape fruit wines (especially apple).. Ferments best between 17°-30°C (64°-86°F). Sensitive below 13°C (55°F).


Red Star® Premier Cuvée (Davis 796), a strain of Saccharomyces bayanus from a French wine yeast, is a special isolate of Red Star Yeast & Products. This yeast has good tolerance to ethanol and free sulfur dioxide, and ferments to dryness. Premier Cuvée is noted as a very low producer of foam, urea, and fusel oils. It is recommended for reds, whites and especially champagne. This yeast is reported to perform well restarting stuck fermentations. Winemakers have remarked that Premier Cuvée is the fastest, cleanest, and most neutral fermenter offered by Red Star®. Ferments best between 7°-35°C (45°-95°F).


Red Star® Pasteur Redtm (Davis 904), a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been derived from the collection of the Institute Pasteur in Paris. It is a strong, even fermenter that produces full bodied reds. This yeast encourages the development of varietal fruit flavors, balanced by complex aromas, especially when using grapes of the Cabernet family. It may be necessary to cool the fermenting must to prevent unwanted temperature increase. This yeast is reported to give character to less robust red grapes, or those picked before optimum development.

Again, all info from the web. Just nice to have all in one place for quick reference.

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Re: Red Star Brand Yeast Quick Reference List

Post by Bayou-Ruler » Sun Jan 09, 2011 9:39 am

Red Star® Premier Cuvée is my favorite. Use it often & with stellar results! :shock:
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Re: Red Star Brand Yeast Quick Reference List

Post by exon » Fri Jan 21, 2011 4:20 pm

That is really great info. E !
Definitely something to look forward to... :)

I'm presently using the rad method of what's available on the market shelves and brewing some rather decent kvass.
It's running to 12%abv after a week, or eight days or so.

Do you get noticeably superior results from using those different strains than "Original Red Star Quick Rise Yeast ?
I do proof it each time before I use it, and dump the starter in the carboy.

I generally dump a scant tablespoon in my hand before tossing it into a bowl of the generic all bran cereal sugar wash I'm using, diluted 50% with the water I shall use for cooling, following the boil.

So far I've only had one wash go into dawdling, but I figger that was because I may have goofed up on my measuring for the amount of sugar and nutrients.
I'm keeping it on the warmer for a while longer than others to see how it develops.

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Re: Red Star Brand Yeast Quick Reference List

Post by seaguy » Sun Oct 16, 2011 3:36 pm

I have used curvee to kick start a stalled champagne yeast. Curvee can tolerate up to 18% . I like to get it started in a jar of 100F. sugar water and a little wash. After 2 hrs or so slowly add it to the top of the wash. Wait 1hr, stir top lightly and check it a few hrs later maybe stir a little deeper. By the next day stir the whole wash lightly. You can almost hear it startup. Learned this from Jack Heller and it works :thumbup:
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Re: Red Star Brand Yeast Quick Reference List

Post by trxxx250r » Thu Jan 10, 2013 3:14 pm

I'm a total noob but I was just at Costco and I bought a 2 lb bag of Red Star active dry yeast for $5 bucks. Will this work well or not? I can't see any numerical designation on it like the others mentioned in this thread. Just wondering if it's worth using for distilling and maybe what ABV% I could expect? Ferment time? How much? Also, the best way to add it to my mash...?

I'm doing 5 gal batches with potato, rice, grain, or just sugar....?

Sorry about being so noobish, but I am! Lol. Just need some quick tips.

Thanks!

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Re: Red Star Brand Yeast Quick Reference List

Post by bobtail » Thu Jan 10, 2013 3:20 pm

I use it all the time on sweetfeed & All bran , works great. 10-12% is what i aim for

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Re: Red Star Brand Yeast Quick Reference List

Post by trxxx250r » Thu Jan 10, 2013 6:21 pm

Ok, is 12% the best we can get from this yeast?

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Re: Red Star Brand Yeast Quick Reference List

Post by Bushman » Thu Jan 10, 2013 7:14 pm

trxxx250r wrote:Ok, is 12% the best we can get from this yeast?
10-14% is a great target to shoot for unless your using an all fruit wash for brandy then probably a little less. Over 14% and you start to stress your wash more like using a turbo in my opinion.

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Re: Red Star Brand Yeast Quick Reference List

Post by Durace11 » Fri Jan 11, 2013 10:50 am

Yes, I use the same yeast from the same source, Costco, it works great just keep in in line with the suggested ABV(10%-14%). You don't need or want to go for a really high ABV ferment, they take too long to mellow the flavors and just increase the chance of leaving unfermented sugar in the boiler. Better to shoot for a lower ABV and ensure you ferment all your sugar completely. Sugar leads to foaming and foaming leads to puking and puking leads to dirty distillate. Don't have dirty distillate, shoot for a reasonable ABV.

All that sugar that doesn't get fermented is going down the drain, wasted, when it could have been added to the next ferment and produced more alcohol.
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Re: Red Star Brand Yeast Quick Reference List

Post by trxxx250r » Fri Jan 11, 2013 6:50 pm

Points taken, thank you, I look forward to more!

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Re: Red Star Brand Yeast Quick Reference List

Post by 2_Smithereenz » Sat Feb 02, 2013 1:28 pm

Is there a chart or referrence guide somewhere that would help determine how much Red Star yeast to use in a batch of wash? It seems that everybody has a different idea on how much they use per gallon of liquid, so is it just a matter of trial and error?
Any help would be much appreciated by a newb whos been searching for days to find the answer to this question. This is a great site BTW, haven't found any other like it with as much info as there is here. :thumbup:

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Re: Red Star Brand Yeast Quick Reference List

Post by General Lee » Tue Mar 05, 2013 9:03 am

The more you use, the quicker it will ferment. There are some pros and cons to using more or less. Keep exact logs of what you do, if something goes wrong, somebody on here can probably help you fix it.

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Re: Red Star Brand Yeast Quick Reference List

Post by natasdg47187 » Wed Apr 17, 2013 2:32 pm

hello getting ready to do my first all grain sweet feed wash an trying to figure out this yeast. I purchased some red star quick rise yeast from the local store an im going to ferment in a 5 gallon jar. the packets that I have say net wt.7g an 1/4 oz instant dry yeast. is there a exact amount of yeast or packets that I should use per a gallon or for my five gallon jar. thanks guys for all the help

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Re: Red Star Brand Yeast Quick Reference List

Post by Tater » Wed Apr 17, 2013 3:00 pm

This is on the parent site .-How Much Yeast to Use in Fermentations
Jack advises ...

To use the best brewing guidelines- use 2 to 4 grams of dried yeast per gallon of mash.
If the alcohol is in the 5% or less range - use 2 grams per gallon.
in the 5 to 7%abv range; use 3 grams per gallon.
In the 8 to 10%abv range use 4 grams per gallon.
You will know when you have pitched the right amount of yeast because the high kraeusen stage (the tall foamy cap) will have formed in four hours or less. If it takes longer than 4 hours- don't worry too much. If it takes longer than 24 hours to form- you aren't using enough yeast.

Higher than 4 grams per gallon will get you some sulfur flavors that can be hard to get rid of, so only use the 100 grams of dry yeast per 5 gallons (20 litres) rule for a pure sugar mash that is destined to be carbon polished and turned into vodka or a "base spirit" for liqueurs, etc.

If buying that much dry yeast is a problem, you can make a starter. Make a small "mini batch" of your mash - using the same ingredients at the same concentration (no less than 500ml no more than 2,000ml for a 5 gal/20liter batch) and put it into a sanitized glass flask, bottle, jug, etc. Do this one or two days before you plan to make the main (5 gal/20L) batch. Add the small (typically 5 gram) packet of yeast to the starter, and when it is at high kraeusen, add it to the main batch. Yeast "learns" to feed on sugars when it wakes up from that little packet- it takes yeast seven generations to learn how to digest a different kind of sugar- therefore you MUST make your starter out of the same stuff you are going to make the main mash out of (this is why waking up your yeast in orange juice is a bad idea). Also, yeast is sensitive to sugar concentrations- so the starter MUST be the same strength or weaker than the main batch in order to prevent osmotic pressure from causing the formation of mutant yeast cells (a big cause of off flavors).

The temperature the yeast is used at also can cause the flavor to degrade. Most whiskey mashes use an ale yeast- the ideal temperature range is 60 to 70 degrees F. Lower temps will slow down the yeast- if sanitation is good- this is not a problem. If a higher temp is reached - the yeast will undergo "stress" reactions that cause excessive ester and higher alcohol formation- this will result in a solvent- like flavor that can carry over into the finished spirit. Lager yeasts tend to form a lot of sulfur compounds at the begining of the ferment- during the lagering stage the yeast reabsorbs these sulfur compounds, leaving a crisp clean lager flavor in the beer- since you don't want to store a whiskey mash for 2 months in the fridge- it's best to use an ale yeast.

When you are fermenting wine (for brandy or drinking)- it is best to use 2 grams of dry yeast per gallon and no more (two of the five gram packets per 5gal/20L batch). It's true that you would think to use 4 grams per gallon since the alcohol is so high (typically 10% or more)- but, with wine, in order to preserve the delicate aroma of the fruit you are fermenting, you need to have a slow, cool (60-70F) ferment to prevent the CO2 from driving off all of the more delicate flavors. A fast ferment in a wine will find the CO2 "scrubbing" the delicate flavors out, leaving you with a bland acidic wine that tastes pretty rough.

Note though that you can over-pitch a wort with too much yeast. Jack warns ..

when used at a rate over 4 grams per gallon (with ale yeast and a potential alcohol of less than 9%), dry yeast will give off some excessive ester/ sulfur compounds that are almost impossible to get rid of through cold storage (lagering). If the stuff is to be distilled, and you "overpitch" your yeast- just make sure you have a LOT of copper to get rid of the extra sulfur compounds.

The very high cell concentrations typically cause a reduction in yeast growth. This makes the yeast that is pitched is the yeast that is responsible for the ferment- if the yeast viability is below 90%, stuck ferments may occur. Otherwise, the profile of the flavors that yeast makes is typically a mix of compounds made during both the aerobic and anaerobic phases- with the aerobic phase suddenly gone- some very odd smells occur (sulfur compounds), that, thanks to the stress of fermenting without any time to adapt (the lag phase), the yeast is damaged, and unable to reabsorb any of the esters and sulfur compounds when they go dormant (during the settling out and lagering phase-if any). The high cell count also makes fining and filtering more difficult.

Overall, underpitching is more of a concern than overpitching. Underpitching causes a long lag time that can allow bacterial infection to take hold, overpitching can cause off flavors to develop that can be removed with a long lagering/secondary ferment, and alot of copper exposure.

As a general rule, you use 400ml of yeast solids per hectoliter of wort (for a lager yeast), and half of that for ale yeast (granted, this is at 12degrees plato). For dry yeast, 2 to 4 grams per gallon of wort is best- 2 grams for standard beer, 4 rgams for doppelbocks, barleywines, etc. For an active yeast starter, the actively fermenting starter should comprise 10% of the volume of the mash/wort. It should also be of the same sugars/composition and at the same concentration (err on the side of a weaker starter, rather than a stronger one- yeast can go from "rags to riches", but not the reverse.)

Ted Palmer writes ...

Many if not most commercial distilleries use some form of brewers yeast. What should determine the type and AMOUNT of yeast is the make-up of your wash. A common problem isn't the type of yeast that you are using but rather how you are using it. A 1.060sg wash will be reduced just fine by any yeast so long as there are enough yeast cells per ml. and enough nitrogen to keep the cells healthy. In fact by repitching more activly fermenting yeast several times into a high gravity wash, a "beer yeast" can ferment up to 16 to 18 percent alc. If you use a packet of dry yeast then there are too few cells let alone heathy ones.

Here are a few guidelines for proper yeast use in any ferment:
You will need 10 X 10^6 cells per ml for any wash up to 1.050sg and 1 X 10^6 cells more for each 1.004sg above 1.050.
Always use a rigorously fermenting pitch of yeast, ie: never use yeast straight from a package, always grow up enough cells for the SG you are using (called a yeast starter). Say you are going to make 10 liters of wash at 1.050, open the package and grow the cells in 10 ml. of 1.050 wash. When fermentation passes the most rigorous point pitch the 10 ml. into 100 ml. of 1.050 wash, repeat this into 1 liter and then pitch into the 10 liters. with higher gravities use 2 or more seperate yeast starters.
Yeast need proper nutrition, nitrogen must be present. If using only sugar put 2 ml. of ammonia per 1 liter of wash. If using fruit juice or grain mash 0.5 ml. per liter. Yeast also need more than just sucrose for food, add some fructose, dextrose, maltose or any other simple sugar. An acid isomerization of sucrose(invert sugar) will also work if other sugars aren't available.
Reuse the yeast from the last batch you made! This is the easiest way to make sure there are enough cells for your wash, keep any eye out for infections though and only reuse yeast that fermented properly in the last batch.
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Re: Red Star Brand Yeast Quick Reference List

Post by MitchyBourbon » Wed Apr 17, 2013 3:12 pm

The short answer is, 1 packet of dry yeast should be fine. The long answer is, about 1 billion live cells per 5 gallons. Dead cells don't count. A single packet will usually have enough viable cells to get the job done but depending on how you pitch the yeast you can easily kill a significant amount.

Many people just sprinkle the dry yeast and go. This can easily kill half of the yeast. A better approach is to first re-hydrate the yeast in a cup of plain warm water 90 F. Don't stir for first 5 minutes. Allow it to cool to the same temp as the wash in your fermenter. Then pitch into your well aereated wash.

Posted same time as Tater.
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Re: Red Star Brand Yeast Quick Reference List

Post by natasdg47187 » Wed Apr 17, 2013 4:50 pm

so once I have all my wash done I should get one packet of 7g yeast an put it in a cup of water at 90 degrees an let it sit for five minutes then dump it into my wash? don't want to kill the yeast but does it matter to put the wash in my ferment jug first then add the yeast or should I add the yeast in the pot of wash stir it up then add to the ferment jar.

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Re: Red Star Brand Yeast Quick Reference List

Post by MitchyBourbon » Wed Apr 17, 2013 5:26 pm

You want to put the yeast in the cup of warm water, let it dissolve on its own for five minutes. Then let it cool till it is the same temp as wash. Then add it to your wash. It doesn't matter if the wash is not in the fermenter yet. Keep the area clean and keep things covered to prevent unwanted wild yeast and bacteria from infecting your wash.
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Re: Red Star Brand Yeast Quick Reference List

Post by natasdg47187 » Thu Apr 18, 2013 3:54 pm

ok I started my yeast an added it to my wash last night. about 5 hours later I checked my wash an it was bubbling thru my airlock alittle. today at 6pm would make it 18hours I started my yeast. I counted my bubbles in my airlock and it was 28 bubbles per 1 minute, is that normal? do I need to agitate it every day or don't touch it till 7 to 10 days when my airlock stops bubbling. wasent shur it just seems like it almost wasent bubbling that much somethings. what do u suggest? maybe more yeast next time or is everything going as normal.

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Re: Red Star Brand Yeast Quick Reference List

Post by Coyote » Thu Apr 18, 2013 3:56 pm

Like you momma said

" Don't fiddle with that !"

"leave it be or it'll fester"

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Re: Red Star Brand Yeast Quick Reference List

Post by natasdg47187 » Tue Apr 23, 2013 2:56 pm

thanks everything's looking good so far. its been couple days an my airlocks are still bubbling. I know this isn't the right thread an cant find anything in it but is it ok to run a 5 gallon stainless steel pot with a glass lid if I can make a hole in it for my pot still. I think its tampered glass. I've purchased a stainless steel bowl to use on top instead but it almost falls into the pot. I cant find one that fits exactly on top in the grove. what do you guys suggest.

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Re: Red Star Brand Yeast Quick Reference List

Post by MitchyBourbon » Tue Apr 23, 2013 4:12 pm

I wouldn't use a glass lid. I won't speak for others. I just think that where ever I can do something to make this hobby safer that I should.
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Re: Red Star Brand Yeast Quick Reference List

Post by natasdg47187 » Sat Apr 27, 2013 9:09 am

thanks for the help. I did my sweat feed recipe a I put my yeast in an within couple hours it was bubbling real good. I over read your message in previous post about how much yeast to use. you mentioned when you have the right amount of yeast it will foam up. is it really suppose to foam in a sweet feed wash? my airlock was bubbling good but no foam, does that mean I didn't use enough yeast? never did the sweet feed before an when it was done fermenting it had a strange weird wine smell to it. I put it in my pot an ran it Thursday nit an I dumped the first 60ml to be safe then started collecting. my first jar was at 120-125 proof. this was my first run so it would be my strip run but it still has weird smell to it, hard to explain. like I said this is my first ever sweet feed wash an never tasted it before an don't really know how its suppose to smell or taste. any ideas or is it normal? am I doing anything wrong or should I just dump it all back in the pot an run it for the second time an that would be my finished produce to drink.

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Re: Red Star Brand Yeast Quick Reference List

Post by hellbilly72 » Mon Nov 11, 2013 12:13 am

Hi everybody I'm new to this site and also new to distilling of higher spirit but I have been making some decent wine for a short bit !So the other day the idea of making moonshine became as clear as day. So after some online educating I put together a five gallon SS still with a nice copper worm and today I had my dad don't worry i'm 40yrs of age just having car problems bring me 5 lbs of white corn meal and 8 lbs of sugar !these are the amount they were sold in not ingredient amounts After he left it kinda dawned on me that my wine yeast might not be able to pull off a good sour mash run and I live 40 miles from anything even resembling a town ! So I I'm kinda stuck with what I got SO PLEASE GIVE ME YOUR EXPERT OPINION ON MY INGREDIENT SITUATION ! 5 lbs of white corn meal / 8 lbs of sugar and for yeast I got Red Star® Montrachet :? So is this yeast capable of making a good sour mash ??
THANKS YOU IN ADVANCE :thumbup:

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Re: Red Star Brand Yeast Quick Reference List

Post by jetkrazee » Tue Mar 25, 2014 12:05 pm

Has anyone here used the "RedStar Quick" yeast for bread machines? If so, is it more less of a turbo variety of sorts?

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Re: Red Star Brand Yeast Quick Reference List

Post by Prairiepiss » Tue Mar 25, 2014 12:29 pm

jetkrazee wrote:Has anyone here used the "RedStar Quick" yeast for bread machines? If so, is it more less of a turbo variety of sorts?
It's just normal yeast. Same that's in regular red star bread yeast. Supposedly the only difference is. The quick rise has a higher viability count. So basically they test the yeast to see how many of the yeast are viable. And the batches that have a higher amount of viable yeast. Gets packaged as quick rise.
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Re: Red Star Brand Yeast Quick Reference List

Post by jetkrazee » Tue Mar 25, 2014 12:32 pm

I see. There claim on the jar/package is 50% faster but I wondered if that was just a sales pitch, no pun intended.

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Re: Red Star Brand Yeast Quick Reference List

Post by Prairiepiss » Tue Mar 25, 2014 12:37 pm

Does the ingredients say anything other then yeast? None of them I have seen. Say anything but yeast.

I have seen some with enzymes in it. Can't remember what it was called. But it was another brand of bakers yeast. And I still wouldn't call it a turbo yeast.
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Re: Red Star Brand Yeast Quick Reference List

Post by jetkrazee » Tue Mar 25, 2014 12:43 pm

I know it has some sort of acid but don't recall what kind.

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Re: Red Star Brand Yeast Quick Reference List

Post by rad14701 » Tue Mar 25, 2014 12:43 pm

What "usually" makes a yeast "quick rise" or "rapid rise" is the addition of ascorbic acid... I've found that to be the only additional ingredient listed although one brand did have yet another ingredient that I can't remember off the top of my head right now...

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Re: Red Star Brand Yeast Quick Reference List

Post by jetkrazee » Tue Mar 25, 2014 12:53 pm

Yup, that's it rad, ascorbic acid.

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