Types of sugar

Sugar, and all about sugar washes. Where the primary ingredient is sugar, and other things are just used as nutrients.

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Types of sugar

Post by Tater » Fri Aug 13, 2010 9:01 am

Sugar - Types of Sugar - Different Types of Sugar








sugarSugar - Sugar or sucrose, is a carbohydrate that occurs naturally in every fruit and vegetable in the plant kingdom. It is the major product of photosynthesis, the process by which plants transform the sugar energy into food. Sugar occurs in greatest quantities in sugar cane and sugar beets from which it is separated for commercial use.


White Sugar:

There are many different types of granulated sugar. Some of these are used only by the food industry and professional bakers and are not available in the supermarket
. The types of granulated sugars differ in crystal size. Each crystal size provides unique functional characteristics that make the sugar appropriate for a specific food’s special need.

Bakers Special Sugar - The crystal size of Bakers Special is even finer than that of fruit sugar. As its name suggests, it was developed specially for the baking industry. Bakers Special is used for sugaring doughnuts and cookies, as well as in some commercial cake recipes to create a fine crumb texture.

Barbados sugar – See raw sugar and muscovado sugar.

Castor/caster sugar – Spelled both "caster" and "castor." The spelling castor sugar used to be the prevailing one, but caster sugar seems to be more usual now, perhaps because it is used by some sugar manufacturers on their packaging. See superfine sugar. UK castor/caster sugar is very finely granulated sugar (finer than U.S. granulated sugar) which allows it to dissolve almost instantly. In the United States, superfine sugar or the new Baker's sugar may be substituted. It is called "berry sugar" in British Columbia.

Confectioners or powdered sugar - In Britain it is called icing sugar and in France sucre glace. This sugar is granulated sugar ground to a smooth powder and then sifted. It contains about 3% cornstarch to prevent caking. Powdered sugar is ground into three different degrees of fineness. The confectioners sugar available in supermarkets – 10X – is the finest of the three and is used in icings, confections and whipping cream. The other two types of powdered sugar are used by industrial bakers.

Coarse sugar - Also known as pearl or decorating sugar. As its name implies, the crystal size of coarse sugar is larger than that of “regular” sugar. Coarse sugar is recovered when molasses-rich, sugar syrups high in sucrose are allowed to crystallize. The large crystal size of coarse sugar makes it highly resistant to color change or inversion (natural breakdown to fructose and glucose) at cooking and baking temperatures. These characteristics are important in making fondants, confections and liquors.

Date sugar – Date sugar is more a food than a sweetener. It is ground up from dehydrated dates, is high in fiber. Its use is limited by price and the fact it does not dissolve when added to liquids.

Fruit Sugar - Fruit sugar is slightly finer than “regular” sugar and is used in dry mixes such as gelatin and pudding desserts
, and powdered drinks. Fruit sugar has a more uniform small crystal size than “regular” sugar. The uniformity of crystal size prevents separation or settling of larger crystals to the bottom of the box, an important quality in dry mixes.

Granulated sugar – Also called table sugar or white sugar. This is the sugar most known to consumers, is the sugar found in every home’s sugar bowl, and most commonly used in home food preparation. It is the most common form of sugar and the type most frequently called for in recipes. Its main distinguishing characteristics are a paper-white color and fine crystals.

Sugar cubes – They are made from moist granulated sugar that is pressed into molds and then dried.

Raw sugar – It is essentially the product at the point before the molasses is removed (what’s left after sugarcane has been processed and refined). Popular types of raw sugar include demerara sugar from Guyana and Barbados sugar, a moist, fine textured sugar. Turbinado sugar is raw sugar that has been steam cleaned to remove contaminates., leaving a llight molasses flavored, tan colored sugar.

Sanding sugar - Also known as coarse sugar. A large crystal sugar that is used mainly in the baking and confectionery industries as a sprinkle on top of baked goods. The large crystals reflect light and give the product a sparkling appearance.

Superfine, ultra fine, or bar sugar - This sugar’s crystal size is the finest of all the types of granulated white sugar. It is ideal for delicately textured cakes and meringues, as well as for sweetening fruits and iced-drinks since it dissolves easily. In England, a sugar very similar to superfine sugar is known as caster or castor sugar, named after the type of shaker in which it is often packaged.


Brown Sugar:

Brown sugar (light and dark) - Brown sugar retains some of the surface molasses syrup, which imparts a characteristic pleasurable flavor. Dark brown sugar has a deeper color and stronger molasses flavor than light brown sugar. Lighter types are generally used in baking and making butterscotch, condiments and glazes. The rich, full flavor of dark brown sugar makes it good for gingerbread, mincemeat, baked beans, and other full flavored foods.

Demerara sugar - Popular in England, Demerara sugar is a light brown sugar with large golden crystals, which are slightly sticky from the adhering molasses. It is often used in tea, coffee, or on top of hot cereals.

Muscovado or Barbados sugar - Muscovado sugar, a British specialty brown sugar, is very dark brown and has a particularly strong molasses flavor. The crystals are slightly coarser and stickier in texture than “regular” brown sugar.

Free-flowing brown sugars - These sugars are specialty products produced by a co-crystallization process. The process yields fine, powder-like brown sugar that is less moist than “regular” brown sugar. Since it is less moist, it does not clump and is free-flowing like white sugar.

Turbinado sugar - This sugar is raw sugar which has been partially processed, where only the surface molasses has been washed off. It has a blond color and mild brown sugar flavor, and is often used in tea and other beverages.


Liquid Sugar:

Liquid sugars - There are several types of liquid sugar. Liquid sugar (sucrose) is white granulated sugar that has been dissolved in water before it is used. Liquid sugar is ideal for products whose recipes first require sugar to be dissolved. Amber liquid sugar is darker in color and can be used in foods where brown color is desired.

Invert sugar - Sucrose can be split into its two component sugars (glucose and fructose). This process is called inversion, and the product is called invert sugar. Commercial invert sugar is a liquid product that contains equal amounts of glucose and fructose. Because fructose is sweeter than either glucose or sucrose, invert sugar is sweeter than white sugar. Commercial liquid invert sugars are prepared as different mixtures of sucrose and invert sugar. For example total invert sugar is half glucose and half fructose, while 50% invert sugar (half of the sucrose has been inverted) is one-half sucrose, one-quarter glucose and one-quarter fructose. Invert sugar is used mainly by food manufacturers to retard the crystallization of sugar and to retain moisture in the packaged food. Which particular invert sugar is used is determined by which function – retarding crystallization or retaining moisture – is required.

Home cooks make invert sugar whenever a recipe calls for a sugar to be boiled gently in a mixture of water and lemon juice.
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Re: Types of sugar

Post by flip » Fri Aug 13, 2010 9:20 am

Hi Tater
thanks for this info!

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Re: Types of sugar

Post by rogerguy1 » Sat Oct 30, 2010 5:29 am

Nice introduction to sugar!! I have one question (I'm pretty new here!)....I have a sugar wash recipe from another site. It says to use "cane" sugar only - "beet" sugar will not work as well. Have any of you run into this? The only "cane" sugar I can find is "C and H".....I bet it's more expensive than the other sugars on the shelf.

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Re: Types of sugar

Post by Dnderhead » Sat Oct 30, 2010 7:28 am

the difference between "refined" beet and cain sugar is little and I doubt any one will notice, the unrefined or molasses
is a different story.beet molasses can be down right disgusting.

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Re: Types of sugar

Post by LWTCS » Sat Oct 30, 2010 2:49 pm

Shame on me for not reading this when you posted it Tater.

Great info.
Thanx
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Re: Types of sugar

Post by myles » Sat Oct 30, 2010 6:32 pm

Thanks Tater.
It might be different elsewhere but in the UK, Demerara is a raw cane sugar. In contrast to 'brown' sugars, that are white granulated sugar ( fom various sources) that have been coloured with various quantities of treacle and/or molasses

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Re: Types of sugar

Post by Tater » Wed Nov 03, 2010 6:36 pm

http://www.sucrose.com/learn.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;" rel="nofollow
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Re: Types of sugar

Post by regulardaddy » Thu Nov 04, 2010 4:20 pm

Sweet! :)

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Re: Types of sugar

Post by razbarb » Sat Dec 25, 2010 11:06 am

thanks for the interesting read.

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Re: Types of sugar

Post by tony55555 » Sat Mar 12, 2011 8:49 pm

So, what is the best and cheapest sugar to make ethanol with?

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Re: Types of sugar

Post by blanikdog » Sat Mar 12, 2011 10:53 pm

The best of anything is never the cheapest. Keep reading and you will ultimately answer you own silly question. :)
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Re: Types of sugar: EQUIVQLENTS & SUBSTITUTIONS

Post by likkerluvver » Sun Mar 13, 2011 3:53 am

Here's a link which might help when substituting types of sugar in international recipes, based on local availability:

http://www.culinarytips.net/ingredient- ... titutions/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;" rel="nofollow

The sugar types (and yeast) are at the bottom of the chart on the left.


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Re: Types of sugar

Post by WalkingWolf » Sun Mar 13, 2011 5:27 am

tony55555 wrote:So, what is the best and cheapest sugar to make ethanol with?
The one you can get your hands on the easiest. Converting it is just the tip of the iceberg -- and it's actually done for you. The quality of your product will depend on your commitment to learn your craft.

How many times has best AND cheapest been the same answer in other endeavors you've participated in?

good luck

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Re: Types of sugar

Post by bluestar » Sat Mar 26, 2011 8:38 am

Has anyone fermented and distilled from "sugar beet thick syrup"? This is the precursor to granulated sugar, not the syrup produced from the granulated sugar. It is about 70% solids and about 92% of that is sugar. It is also not the same as the sugar beet syrup made in Germany, that is just cooked extract.

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Re: Types of sugar

Post by Blacksheep » Tue Apr 05, 2011 1:54 pm

Hey i've just distilled a sugar wash last night. When i made up my wash, i differed from regular white sugar to glucose which a friend can get for cheap and had plenty of in his garage, i stayed up till midnight getting the last drop out of my still, (i'll put the tails back in with the next batch of course) yet for some reason my yield was significantly reduced. I also changed part of my packing from 'goldylocks' to marbles.
My regular yield is about 8L at approx 90% (incl tails).... Last night i got 5L at approx 85% (incl tails)

Any ideas as to why this would be?

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Re: Types of sugar

Post by Tater » Tue Apr 05, 2011 2:10 pm

Blacksheep wrote:Hey i've just distilled a sugar wash last night. When i made up my wash, i differed from regular white sugar to glucose which a friend can get for cheap and had plenty of in his garage, i stayed up till midnight getting the last drop out of my still, (i'll put the tails back in with the next batch of course) yet for some reason my yield was significantly reduced. I also changed part of my packing from 'goldylocks' to marbles.
My regular yield is about 8L at approx 90% (incl tails).... Last night i got 5L at approx 85% (incl tails)

Any ideas as to why this would be?
http://homedistiller.org/sugar/wash-sugar/sugar" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;" rel="nofollow
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Re: Types of sugar

Post by Blacksheep » Tue Apr 05, 2011 8:49 pm

Thanks Tater
I've read that but i'm still at a loss as to why the yield would be so much lower than normal?

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Re: Types of sugar

Post by Tater » Wed Apr 06, 2011 4:15 am

http://homedistiller.org/sugar/wash-sugar/yield" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;" rel="nofollow
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Re: Types of sugar

Post by Dnderhead » Wed Apr 06, 2011 6:06 am

"at a loss as to why the yield would be so much lower"
I believe it is because of the difference in the amount of
Carbon and Oxygen that is present in the different sugars.
(that is the difference between sugars)(C variable- H2- O variable)
Alcohol is made of the same just a different "arrangement"
so if it is "short" on one then it wont make as much alcohol.
something like making cookies,if it takes a cup of sugar/2 cups of flour/1 TAB of shortening
but you have one cup of sugar/1 cup of flour /1 TAB of shortening ,then you cant
make as many.
(if your really interested you could research the difference in sugars)

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Re: Types of sugar

Post by The Frederick » Mon May 23, 2011 12:31 am

Hey, I got a question. Is all sugar equal? For example, if a recipe calls for 10 kg white sugar, can I just substitute brown sugar in the same quantity and get a result?

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Re: Types of sugar

Post by rad14701 » Mon May 23, 2011 4:51 am

The Frederick wrote:Hey, I got a question. Is all sugar equal? For example, if a recipe calls for 10 kg white sugar, can I just substitute brown sugar in the same quantity and get a result?
Look HERE at what I found with less than 30 seconds of research...

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Re: Types of sugar

Post by BoomTown » Sat Sep 22, 2012 6:52 am

Is there a web store source for cane molasses? I'm not looking for anyone to spam me, but would like to acquire several gallons just to tinker with rum recipes. Buy it off the grocer's shelf seems like a very expensive approach...

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Re: Types of sugar

Post by Fetsmith » Mon Oct 15, 2012 5:47 pm

Can you use brown sugar in a sugar shine recipe? instead of white sugar.

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Re: Types of sugar

Post by LWTCS » Mon Oct 15, 2012 7:14 pm

Fetsmith wrote:Can you use brown sugar in a sugar shine recipe? instead of white sugar.
yes
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Re: Types of sugar

Post by bcboyz86 » Mon Jan 14, 2013 8:25 am

So where would using sugar can juice/syrup fit into a sugar wash? Would it better for using since its less processed and retains some nutrients lost in the fermenting process? Or is it not good because of all the extra stuff? I've read that there isn't a significant difference except its more expensive and the flavor is slightly different. I was wondering if that was just one persons opinion or if there is actually backing to it? Kind of like using table molasses is better than blackstrap kind of a situation.
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Re: Types of sugar

Post by Durace11 » Mon Jan 14, 2013 8:32 am

Yes, it comes in several different types but if it's fermentable then it will make alcohol. If you are doing an all sugar wash you are probably going to reflux it and it will have very little flavor carry over in the end product. If you are pot stilling it I would suggest using a recipe that has something with flavor in it so you get that flavor over just plain sugar. Something like UJSSM or Sweetfeed where sugar is the alcohol and the flavor comes from the other stuff.
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Re: Types of sugar

Post by LWTCS » Mon Jan 14, 2013 11:00 am

Unmolested cane juice and saccharomyces cerevisiae are a match made in heaven.
18 brix is optimal for the yeast and thats where the juice measures.
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Re: Types of sugar

Post by Gaztops » Fri Mar 22, 2013 9:13 am

I have found that Granulated Sugar Cane gives a higher Starting SG than Granulated Beet Sugar of equal quantities.
I mixed a 25 litre wash with 5kg/11 Ib Cane Sugar and It gave me a Staring SG of 1.080, where as another 25 litre wash with 5kg/ 11Ib had a Starting SG of 1.072, even though Beet and Cane sugar are the same price in our supermarkets, in the long run it is cheaper to use Cane Sugar than Beet Sugar as I always try to keep my SG in the 1.70 range.
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Re: Types of sugar

Post by Koula » Fri Jul 26, 2013 5:36 am

This will definitely turn a few heads upside down, but hear me out. There are suppliers in the US purporting to sell "organic ethanol", cane derived is the cheapest up to grape derived being the most expensive. There's also suggestions that dextrose from brew shops is most likely derived from GMO corn(any insiders here?) So, chemistry and all cynicism aside, I simply don't want to be supporting GMO products, and equally don't enjoy the idea of pesticide laden sugarcane sugar either, therefore another option not mentioned is...organic sugar. So, from the thinkers out there who don't mind exploring the deeper tangents of sourcing materials and the subtle influences they may, or may not have, including ethical, alchemical or esoteric considerations, what do you think about using "organic raw sugar" from sugarcane?

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Re: Types of sugar

Post by knightmare1015 » Wed Sep 18, 2013 7:22 pm

Dextrose or Corn sugar is harder to get and usually costs more, but you can get it at Brewhaus in either a 10 or 50 LB bag. I've not used it myself yet, but I'm told that it does produce a better quality spirit in the end. Here's the links:

http://www.brewhaus.com/Dextrose-10lb-P862C91.aspx" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;" rel="nofollow

^ I bet if you use this combined with ordinary table sugar, you'd have a really nice and sweet spirit. Here's the other link:

http://www.brewhaus.com/Dextrose-50lb-P863C91.aspx" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;" rel="nofollow
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