Gardening

Discussions of fruits/ veggies and grains other then just mashing

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Gardening

Postby cjones636 » Sun Apr 24, 2016 6:58 pm

Anyone into gardening? I love it. Been doing it all my life nearly. When i was little papa would have to till me up a small spot away from his garden so i could pant my own. I wouldn't plant stuff in his, because i wanted my own for some reason lol. Last year i made a purchase of what is called blumats, i loved them so much because i didn't really do anything to that row of tomatoes last year except fertilized it and hoe'd around them a few times. If i had blumats around all my tomatoes last year, my work load would have been cut in half! Only thing i did was filled my 55 gallon drum up.. Mix my MG in with it and it was done!



I made a small raised bed i was going to plant my carrots in, but somehow i ended up sitting out some tomatoes in there and i decided to put my blumats in there.

I currently have....

Carrots, Beets, Broccoli, lettuce, onions, squash, peas and collards sit out. My orangeglo watermelons will be ready to sit out may 1st. I just went and head and planted my 20 rows of corn the other day. My okra and beans will be planted soon.
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Re: Gardening

Postby cranky » Sun Apr 24, 2016 7:35 pm

That's cool, I could really use something like that. I've been trying to get my 28 San Marsano tomato starts planted the past couple days. I've also been trying to get the rest of the garden ready for planting. I do summer squash, tomatoes, garlic and green beans every year and usually try to do a few other things. This year I'm adding carrots and hoping to have better success with corn, I tried last year but only got a couple of stalks. I'm also hoping to have better luck with the butternut squash, last year I got 1. There is a garden thread around here somewhere but I haven't seen any posts in it lately.
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Re: Gardening

Postby GrassHopper » Sun Apr 24, 2016 8:09 pm

There are lots of us here that are into gardening. Been my passion for many, many years. Have grown nearly everything, but now in Idaho and have a shorter growing season. Still growing maters, grn onions, peppers, okra, herbs, rhubarb, strawberries, marion berries, blue berries, raspberries, cherries, apricots, apples, pears, peaches, nectarines. I am passionate about my geraniums which I keep year round by bringing them indoors for the winter. I have around 30 pots of various colors and varieties that I propagate, sell and give to friends. I grow lemons as well, (which don't grow here normally). Grafting has also been a hobby to me as well. GMO's and selective engineering are a blessing. Just imagine if we had to eat the corn that the Indians ate. Some ancient cobs found in caves had maybe 10 kernels. I have had some interesting results by genetically modifying certain flowers as well.
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Re: Gardening

Postby moosemilk » Mon Apr 25, 2016 12:22 am

Family was all farmers in old country. Being in the city here though just meant smaller gardens and no horses and cows (chicken coop way back at great grandmas in the city). I was fortunate that I had grandparents who taught me what they knew even in a small city garden, and parents who kept a garden as well. Mostly just staples like they were used to . . . tomatoes, beans, cucumbers, corn, cabbage (lots of cabbage), potatoes, carrots, lettuce, green onion, radish, peas, beets. Even with a short season here in N. Ontario, i get a fair amount when i plant. Even managed some nice pumpkins one year, and red and green bell peppers. Nothing like fresh from your own garden. I even have a patch of wild horse raddish (love that stuff, but it's a pita to dig up because it's at it's best when the ground just freezes . . . and gotta be careful because it'll spread and run rampant fast).

Best thing i ever had for fertilizer we call "sh*t tea". Take a big drum, toss in some manure and water, and keep a lid on it in the sun. I toss all my old veggies (cores and stuff) as well in through the summer. Smells like hell, but a cup of that every 4 or so days on each plant is like steroids. Take a couple buckets out for feeding time, add water back in to fill up.
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Re: Gardening

Postby cranky » Mon Apr 25, 2016 5:12 am

GrassHopper wrote:GMO's and selective engineering are a blessing. Just imagine if we had to eat the corn that the Indians ate. Some ancient cobs found in caves had maybe 10 kernels. I have had some interesting results by genetically modifying certain flowers as well.

Screw GMO's and the companies who make them! Corn was at a good hybridized state long before somebody decided they could take over the worlds food supply by manipulating it in a lab.
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Re: Gardening

Postby GrassHopper » Mon Apr 25, 2016 5:38 am

cranky wrote:
GrassHopper wrote:GMO's and selective engineering are a blessing. Just imagine if we had to eat the corn that the Indians ate. Some ancient cobs found in caves had maybe 10 kernels. I have had some interesting results by genetically modifying certain flowers as well.

Screw GMO's and the companies who make them! Corn was at a good hybridized state long before somebody decided they could take over the worlds food supply by manipulating it in a lab.


When they start modifying people to take over the world....then I will be with ya Cranky. Till then we can agree to disagree with one another on certain things. :thumbup:
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Re: Gardening

Postby cranky » Mon Apr 25, 2016 6:24 am

GrassHopper wrote:Till then we can agree to disagree with one another on certain things. :thumbup:

I agree, you are allowed to be as wrong as anybody else :moresarcasm: I've never made it any secret I am one of those anti GMO nuts and that argument has been hashed through many times. I figure I only need to make it another couple hundred years to get caught up in life and growing my own food is the only safe way to get there. Once I'm gone I don't care what people do to this world or the human race.
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Re: Gardening

Postby cranky » Mon Apr 25, 2016 6:26 am

GrassHopper wrote:I have had some interesting results by genetically modifying certain flowers as well.

Just curious Grasshopper, Are you gene splicing flowers at home?
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Re: Gardening

Postby cjones636 » Mon Apr 25, 2016 7:44 am

moosemilk wrote:Family was all farmers in old country. Being in the city here though just meant smaller gardens and no horses and cows (chicken coop way back at great grandmas in the city). I was fortunate that I had grandparents who taught me what they knew even in a small city garden, and parents who kept a garden as well. Mostly just staples like they were used to . . . tomatoes, beans, cucumbers, corn, cabbage (lots of cabbage), potatoes, carrots, lettuce, green onion, radish, peas, beets. Even with a short season here in N. Ontario, i get a fair amount when i plant. Even managed some nice pumpkins one year, and red and green bell peppers. Nothing like fresh from your own garden. I even have a patch of wild horse raddish (love that stuff, but it's a pita to dig up because it's at it's best when the ground just freezes . . . and gotta be careful because it'll spread and run rampant fast).

Best thing i ever had for fertilizer we call "sh*t tea". Take a big drum, toss in some manure and water, and keep a lid on it in the sun. I toss all my old veggies (cores and stuff) as well in through the summer. Smells like hell, but a cup of that every 4 or so days on each plant is like steroids. Take a couple buckets out for feeding time, add water back in to fill up.


You reminded me that i need to go get my seed taters at the hardware store before they sell out again... lol

I'm going to try that shit tea. I have several large 55 gallon drums. I have a garden that i plant my regular stuff every year, then i have a seperate garden where i plant new things, or to try out different products and techniques (gardening would get boring if i didn't do this lol).

As i'm setting out plants, i like to sprinkle some Mycorrhizae and Azospirillum Brasilense in the hole. Really good stuff! You can get it from extreme gardening, but if you have a large garden i would go with another brand.

Before feeding my garden, i like to also mix everything in the large drum and let it sit out for a day or so to allow the chlorine to evaporate out of the water. This gives me a chance to adjust the PH of the water. I also aerate my water for a day or two using a air pump and stone.
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Re: Gardening

Postby cjones636 » Mon Apr 25, 2016 7:51 am

GrassHopper wrote:There are lots of us here that are into gardening. Been my passion for many, many years. Have grown nearly everything, but now in Idaho and have a shorter growing season. Still growing maters, grn onions, peppers, okra, herbs, rhubarb, strawberries, marion berries, blue berries, raspberries, cherries, apricots, apples, pears, peaches, nectarines. I am passionate about my geraniums which I keep year round by bringing them indoors for the winter. I have around 30 pots of various colors and varieties that I propagate, sell and give to friends. I grow lemons as well, (which don't grow here normally). Grafting has also been a hobby to me as well. GMO's and selective engineering are a blessing. Just imagine if we had to eat the corn that the Indians ate. Some ancient cobs found in caves had maybe 10 kernels. I have had some interesting results by genetically modifying certain flowers as well.


GMO doesn't bother me as it does some people; in fact everything in the store is genetically modified, even heirlooms. Most people see heirloom and think that it hasn't been genetically modified. I'm sorry but when was the last time you seen a Seedless Watermelon growing in the wild?
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Re: Gardening

Postby GrassHopper » Mon Apr 25, 2016 7:55 am

cranky wrote:
GrassHopper wrote:I have had some interesting results by genetically modifying certain flowers as well.

Just curious Grasshopper, Are you gene splicing flowers at home?


No. I don't have the depth of knowledge or equip (gene gun). Using DNA culture techniques. I have access to the University. I am learning to do traditional assays for mining and know some really smart people. I have created a lab at home for mining interests. I bought out a former mining company lab equipment and chemicals. I have about 2,000 lbs of litharge if anyone has a use. You pay for shipping.

I think there are good concerns on both sides of the GMO issue. I respect your concerns. Hell, we may create a monster. :moresarcasm:

Sorry OP, didn't mean to get off topic. Back to gardening.
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Re: Gardening

Postby cranky » Mon Apr 25, 2016 9:50 am

cjones636 wrote:GMO doesn't bother me as it does some people; in fact everything in the store is genetically modified, even heirlooms. Most people see heirloom and think that it hasn't been genetically modified. I'm sorry but when was the last time you seen a Seedless Watermelon growing in the wild?

This is where people get confused because there is a group purposely trying to confuse people between Hybridisation, which technically can happen in nature under the right conditions and GMO a process that takes place in a lab by manipulating genes removing some and or adding in new ones.
Seedless watermelons are whats known as an F1 hybrid, and yes it is possible for that to happen in nature.
Here is a little info about that
http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden- ... -seeds.htm
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Re: Gardening

Postby moosemilk » Mon Apr 25, 2016 12:27 pm

cranky wrote:
cjones636 wrote:GMO doesn't bother me as it does some people; in fact everything in the store is genetically modified, even heirlooms. Most people see heirloom and think that it hasn't been genetically modified. I'm sorry but when was the last time you seen a Seedless Watermelon growing in the wild?

This is where people get confused because there is a group purposely trying to confuse people between Hybridisation, which technically can happen in nature under the right conditions and GMO a process that takes place in a lab by manipulating genes removing some and or adding in new ones.
Seedless watermelons are whats known as an F1 hybrid, and yes it is possible for that to happen in nature.
Here is a little info about that
http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden- ... -seeds.htm


Hybrid is what mendelion genetics is. Basic high school biology. Mendel played around with pea plants and cross pollinated to create the same plant with different traits. If it were humans it would be the equivalent of breeding only blue eyed children until you have only blue eyed children and all other traits have been eliminated. There is no genetic modification there. Just breeding. Just like taking certain plants and cross pollinating those with desired traits only and doing so on and on. GMO like cranky said is actually modifying the genetic make-up of the species. Companies like Monsanto do this and then can patent the seed. The large problem is their patented seed grows and cross pollinates with neighbouring non GMO plants, which then produce the patented seed. Now the farmer who has used seeds from previous crops can no longer do so without paying for it because this company owns the right to that seed. Total bs. But just one problem with GMO's. Hope this paints the pic cranky was stating.

Another problems with GMO's is the safety of them.

“GMO sweet corn is genetically engineered to be herbicide resistant (Roundup Ready) and to produce its own insecticide (Bt Toxin). Like all GMOs, genetically modified sweet corn has not been thoroughly tested to ensure that it is safe for consumption,” NGP reported.
Source: http://www.newsmax.com/Health/Health-Wi ... id/648727/

My thoughts: I'd rather have something that humans have been eating as-is for thousands of years and proven safe, or that nature can come up with on it's own than something which may have been modified BY humans genetically to create toxins (would you ingest insecticide? if not, then why would you ingest food that produces it's own insecticide?).

Nothing but GMO free for my garden, with no herbicides, insecticides, pesticides. Just pure cow crap from local farms that have free roaming non-gmo fed cattle (a friends farm in other words).
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Re: Gardening

Postby cjones636 » Mon Apr 25, 2016 5:42 pm

cranky wrote:
cjones636 wrote:GMO doesn't bother me as it does some people; in fact everything in the store is genetically modified, even heirlooms. Most people see heirloom and think that it hasn't been genetically modified. I'm sorry but when was the last time you seen a Seedless Watermelon growing in the wild?

This is where people get confused because there is a group purposely trying to confuse people between Hybridisation, which technically can happen in nature under the right conditions and GMO a process that takes place in a lab by manipulating genes removing some and or adding in new ones.
Seedless watermelons are whats known as an F1 hybrid, and yes it is possible for that to happen in nature.
Here is a little info about that
http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden- ... -seeds.htm


You learn something new everyday! :D
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Re: Gardening

Postby cjones636 » Mon Apr 25, 2016 6:01 pm

moosemilk wrote:
cranky wrote:
cjones636 wrote:GMO doesn't bother me as it does some people; in fact everything in the store is genetically modified, even heirlooms. Most people see heirloom and think that it hasn't been genetically modified. I'm sorry but when was the last time you seen a Seedless Watermelon growing in the wild?

This is where people get confused because there is a group purposely trying to confuse people between Hybridisation, which technically can happen in nature under the right conditions and GMO a process that takes place in a lab by manipulating genes removing some and or adding in new ones.
Seedless watermelons are whats known as an F1 hybrid, and yes it is possible for that to happen in nature.
Here is a little info about that
http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden- ... -seeds.htm


Hybrid is what mendelion genetics is. Basic high school biology. Mendel played around with pea plants and cross pollinated to create the same plant with different traits. If it were humans it would be the equivalent of breeding only blue eyed children until you have only blue eyed children and all other traits have been eliminated. There is no genetic modification there. Just breeding. Just like taking certain plants and cross pollinating those with desired traits only and doing so on and on. GMO like cranky said is actually modifying the genetic make-up of the species. Companies like Monsanto do this and then can patent the seed. The large problem is their patented seed grows and cross pollinates with neighbouring non GMO plants, which then produce the patented seed. Now the farmer who has used seeds from previous crops can no longer do so without paying for it because this company owns the right to that seed. Total bs. But just one problem with GMO's. Hope this paints the pic cranky was stating.

Another problems with GMO's is the safety of them.

“GMO sweet corn is genetically engineered to be herbicide resistant (Roundup Ready) and to produce its own insecticide (Bt Toxin). Like all GMOs, genetically modified sweet corn has not been thoroughly tested to ensure that it is safe for consumption,” NGP reported.
Source: http://www.newsmax.com/Health/Health-Wi ... id/648727/

My thoughts: I'd rather have something that humans have been eating as-is for thousands of years and proven safe, or that nature can come up with on it's own than something which may have been modified BY humans genetically to create toxins (would you ingest insecticide? if not, then why would you ingest food that produces it's own insecticide?).

Nothing but GMO free for my garden, with no herbicides, insecticides, pesticides. Just pure cow crap from local farms that have free roaming non-gmo fed cattle (a friends farm in other words).


Thats Kind of fucked up, and is something else i didn't know. Glad i started this thread now, because i would have known this if i didn't. I always figured GMO was something like selective breeding, accept scientist found a way to speed up that process and the health nuts went ape shit. So you're telling me that if my neighbor has a gmo garden, it could cross-pollinate with mine causing my seeds to be useless or cause me not to have a crop? I know one damn thing, if that's the case i would pull up everyone of his fucking plants! To me, that sounds like they are trying to control the food supply!
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Re: Gardening

Postby moosemilk » Mon Apr 25, 2016 6:08 pm

cjones636 wrote:To me, that sounds like they are trying to control the food supply!


Lightbulb! :idea:
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Re: Gardening

Postby The KYChemist » Mon Apr 25, 2016 6:38 pm

I'm giving the gardening thing another go,for a few reasons. I've always been one that liked the idea of gardening, but never actually liked doing it. It probably goes back to childhood,and being forced to work long hours hoeing, weeding, etc. Well, as I've gotten older, I've learned to appreciate to take pride in the doing and making of things, which I myself accomplish. I recently picked up an old Cub Cadet 104. Just thinking out loud, and joking around, I told the wife I need to get a plow, and disc harrow for it, and grow some corn in a nice sized plot. That way I wouldn't have to buy any for when I start my forays into doing all grains. She said: "Oh please! You couldn't even take care of the last garden you tried to grow. I'll tell you what... If you can grow something in those raised beds(they came with the new house) for two years, you can do whatever you want!" Challenge accepted!! So, I've got a bunch of seedlings working. Cherry and beefsteak tomatoes, broccoli, cauliflower, cucumber, jalapeño and sweet peppers, and some assorted herbs. Hopefully I'll get a decent crop, and after next summer, some new old toys for my Cub!
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Re: Gardening

Postby cranky » Mon Apr 25, 2016 7:10 pm

I spent the last couple days on and off working on my garden, prepping and weeding the raised beds. I went and got a load of garden soil, ( Kent Valley loam, sand and aged steer manure) and refilled my beds. I'm trying to do all the tomatoes in containers but I've run out of containers. One of the easiest things to grow is the green beans. Here is a picture of my green bean pergola from last year.
GARDEN 05 JUL 15  #12 - C.jpg

GARDEN 30 JUL 15 #1 - C.JPG

It's made out of 4 X 4s and has 6 bean beds. I think that's a 12 X 8 space and can produce more beans than we can eat in a year.
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Re: Gardening

Postby goose eye » Mon Apr 25, 2016 9:53 pm

Farmers been savin seed from the beginin.
If my neighbour got round up ready beans an
I don't and his beans cross pollinate my beans
I can't save em to replant unless I pay Monsanto.
Even thou I didn't do anythin wrong.

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Re: Gardening

Postby cjones636 » Tue Apr 26, 2016 7:38 am

The KYChemist wrote:I'm giving the gardening thing another go,for a few reasons. I've always been one that liked the idea of gardening, but never actually liked doing it. It probably goes back to childhood,and being forced to work long hours hoeing, weeding, etc. Well, as I've gotten older, I've learned to appreciate to take pride in the doing and making of things, which I myself accomplish. I recently picked up an old Cub Cadet 104. Just thinking out loud, and joking around, I told the wife I need to get a plow, and disc harrow for it, and grow some corn in a nice sized plot. That way I wouldn't have to buy any for when I start my forays into doing all grains. She said: "Oh please! You couldn't even take care of the last garden you tried to grow. I'll tell you what... If you can grow something in those raised beds(they came with the new house) for two years, you can do whatever you want!" Challenge accepted!! So, I've got a bunch of seedlings working. Cherry and beefsteak tomatoes, broccoli, cauliflower, cucumber, jalapeño and sweet peppers, and some assorted herbs. Hopefully I'll get a decent crop, and after next summer, some new old toys for my Cub!


It's a lot of work, but it's a labor of love i guess. I hilled an 1/2 of potatoes a couple years ago just with a shovel.. I didn't do that anymore LOL. Nowadays i'm getting that work smarter, not harder mentallity. In my "voodoo garden" (small garden where i plant new stuff, try out new products and techniques etc..) I use Landscape Fabric now. I took 2 - 1/2 pvc pipe and elbows and drilled holes in the pipe, put a garden hose fitting on the end of it and placed it under the Landscape Fabric. I have a 35 gallon drum that i mix up my fertilize in. Then i turn an electric pump and it ferlizes the plants.

I found out that when i was trying to fertilize my plants by spraying it on to the Landscape Fabric, it would just roll off. I didn't want to remove the Landscape Fabric because it helps keeps the weeds down and it cuts down on my work load a little bit. So since i came up with that... You can use a soaker hose, but i just had the pvc laying around and used that.

I found that planting new things along with what i plant every year keeps gardening (for me at least) from getting boring.
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Re: Gardening

Postby cjones636 » Tue Apr 26, 2016 7:42 am

cranky wrote:I spent the last couple days on and off working on my garden, prepping and weeding the raised beds. I went and got a load of garden soil, ( Kent Valley loam, sand and aged steer manure) and refilled my beds. I'm trying to do all the tomatoes in containers but I've run out of containers. One of the easiest things to grow is the green beans. Here is a picture of my green bean pergola from last year.
GARDEN 05 JUL 15 #12 - C.jpg

GARDEN 30 JUL 15 #1 - C.JPG

It's made out of 4 X 4s and has 6 bean beds. I think that's a 12 X 8 space and can produce more beans than we can eat in a year.


I been wanting to build a raised bed that is off the ground waist high with cabinets under it to store things. I'm waiting when we all move to our new place to start working on a plan. I would grow short growing plants those raised beds that are waist high... Like Wipporwhill peas and Dixie speckled butterpeas.
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Re: Gardening

Postby cjones636 » Tue Apr 26, 2016 8:02 am

Here is some pictures from the upper garden last year...

Moon and Stars watermelon
Silver Queen Corn
Cherokee Purple Tomatoes
Pink Brandy Wine Tomatoes

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image



More here
http://imgur.com/a/emFVY
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Re: Gardening

Postby cranky » Tue Apr 26, 2016 8:52 am

I wish I had that much room for corn, I used to grow different types of tomatoes, they grow like crazy where I grow them and reach 8ft high I've always had trouble containing them. One year I built a couple tomato cell blocks, like tomato cages only one big unit, The tomatoes in the west cell block got too big and unruly and tore down the cell block, attacked and killed the squash plants then went after the green beans. We had so many tomatoes that year that it was hard to keep up. Then one year I grew San Marsanos, These are an absolutely awesome tomato, My wife loves them so much she insisted we grow nothing else this year. The SMs are not as unruly as the other tomatoes I've grown but they take a lot longer to reach maturity and our growing season is pretty short.
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Re: Gardening

Postby contrahead » Tue Apr 26, 2016 8:56 am

moosemilk wrote:Companies like Monsanto do this and then can patent the seed.


Here is a link exposing some of that conglomerate's history.
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Re: Gardening

Postby moosemilk » Tue Apr 26, 2016 9:34 am

cjones: Your pictures have my mouth watering! Nice looking garden . . . especially the corn :D

contrahead: Interesting link. Seems that company is involved with anything that isn't good for you.
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Re: Gardening

Postby goinbroke2 » Tue Apr 26, 2016 4:05 pm

contrahead wrote:
moosemilk wrote:Companies like Monsanto do this and then can patent the seed.


Here is a link exposing some of that conglomerate's history.

Interesting link,
Will it hurt people or animals etc...that is the only real question. did they make agent orange or are they making millions or any other questions are ridiculous to me. Start a company and grow it, that's not the American way, that's the capitalist way and I agree with it. If they make something that makes life easier or better and make billions doing it, more power to them...like Microsoft, apple, etc, etc they're not considered evil companies even though people talk of brain cancer from cell phones and eye degeneration from monitors.

Anyway, the wife is dead set against them and I'm still on the fence, doing research and seeing strong opinions both ways, some fact based, some emotionally based.
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Re: Gardening

Postby goinbroke2 » Tue Apr 26, 2016 4:22 pm

Forgot to mention the most important part, I like the rototilling/tractor etc side but the weeding, not so much. I grow rhubarb and had some barley grow but generally I'm not much of a green thumb. I got some horseradish and was told to "watch it, it'll take over" I think by the second year it died. :oops:

I grow mud mostly...kinda like I use wood working tools to make sawdust...now metal, that's a different thing all together! :ewink:
Numerous 57L kegs, some propane, one 220v electric with stilldragon controller. Keggle for all-Grain, two pot still tops for whisky, a 3" reflux with deflag for vodka. Coming up, a 4" perf plate column. Life is short, make whisky and drag race!
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Re: Gardening

Postby jedneck » Tue Apr 26, 2016 4:30 pm

I'd rather pull weeds in the garden than waste gas mowing grass(what a waste of space). I eat veggies not grass.
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Re: Gardening

Postby cranky » Tue Apr 26, 2016 6:59 pm

jedneck wrote:I'd rather pull weeds in the garden than waste gas mowing grass(what a waste of space). I eat veggies not grass.

I have always believed in edible landscapes. I have a real problem with morning glories, English ivy and blackberries trying to take over everything so it's a constant battle.
Sometimes I pretend to be normal but it gets boring so I go back to being me

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Re: Gardening

Postby m314 » Tue Apr 26, 2016 8:36 pm

I've been into home gardening since 2000. I'd post some garden pics, but I'm not sure if they're against the rules here.
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