Gelatinization table

Distillation methods and improvements.

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Demy
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Gelatinization table

Post by Demy » Thu Oct 01, 2020 7:34 am

I found this article well explained and not extremely scientific with a useful table that I reproduced in pdf format.
Link to the original article https://www.feedstrategy.com/pig-nutrit ... d-cereals/
Gelatinization table.pdf
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zapata
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Re: Gelatinization table

Post by zapata » Thu Oct 01, 2020 9:19 am

Well, that's one of the simpler, and more accurate of these charts I've seen. But only because it says "average" and "starting" temps. Unfortunately that makes it not that helpful when we want to effectively gelatinize our grains for mashing. Especially for corn, don't believe what you read in any chart, you ain't getting useful for us gelatinization much below 200*F

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Demy
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Re: Gelatinization table

Post by Demy » Thu Oct 01, 2020 9:25 am

zapata wrote:
Thu Oct 01, 2020 9:19 am
Well, that's one of the simpler, and more accurate of these charts I've seen. But only because it says "average" and "starting" temps. Unfortunately that makes it not that helpful when we want to effectively gelatinize our grains for mashing. Especially for corn, don't believe what you read in any chart, you ain't getting useful for us gelatinization much below 200*F
It is a minimal starting point, the article also seems interesting. When I had to gelatinize something to be honest I brought it almost directly to boiling because I noticed greater efficiency but I had doubts about my technique ... can you confirm this then?

JesseMarques
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Re: Gelatinization table

Post by JesseMarques » Thu Oct 01, 2020 11:25 am

Continued heating with excess water causes more amylose, and even amylopectin, to leach, and increases viscosity of solubilized starch until the whole granule is completely soluble at 120C. Degree of solubilization and gelatinization depends on final temperature at which starch is exposed and not on time of holding at a specific temperature.
Those temperatures are for 50% gelatinization:
Starch from different cereals starts to gelatinize at different temperatures, with granule size having a partial effect; small granules generally require less heating to solubilize. Starch from wheat, barley, rye and triticale loses 50 percent of birefringence at about 53C, whereas starch from corn and sorgum loses 50 percent of birefringence at about 67C. Oat starch requires the lowest temperature (55C) among common cereals to reach 50 percent gelatinization, and rice starch the highest (70C)

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