Lets test

Distillation methods and improvements.

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Kareltje
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Re: Lets test

Post by Kareltje » Thu May 12, 2016 4:17 pm

There are a lot of subjects in this post.
still_stirrin wrote:
Kareltje wrote:...recently I added some iron or galvanised nuts and pieces. For I started to doubt the effect of copper pieces in a iron still...Now I have a copper still, so I do not need boiling parts of copper any more...
Carbon steel will rust and galvanized steel is zinc coated. In the presence of hot alcohol, zinc will become toxic...so it is NOT approved for use in a still.
Yes, I know about the rusting of iron. :roll: I added copper cents to provide copper in the distilling process. But I learned that copper is very destructive to iron in a corrosive environment. So maybe I did very wrong in putting pieces of copper in a iron distilling kettle.
I did not find anything about the toxicity of zinc in presence of hot alcohol. If you have any sources, please tell me.
still_stirrin wrote:
Kareltje wrote:...You are familiar with the making of your pennies. Can you tell me more about it?...And why is it not advisable to have non-copper boiling stones?
Well, the composition of US pennies (since 1982) contains 97% zinc with only 3% copper plating. Here's a link which discusses the history: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Penny_(United_States_coin" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;" rel="nofollow)
Thanks, I will study it.
still_stirrin wrote:But again, the reason NOT to use pennies is the zinc which reacts with the hot alcohols. The only approved metals for use in an alcohol still are copper (the real thing, not simply copper plated) and stainless steel.

As there are many alloys of SS, the preferred series are the 300-series stainless steel, in part because they can be welded. The industry standard for most breweries, distillaries, and dairies is the 304 stainless.
ss
I have to point out a misunderstanding: I used cents of my own country, until 2001 made of copper. Since 2001 our eurocents are made of iron, clad or coated with copper. I still use old cents or odd pieces of copper as boiling stones. But our eurocents can be used as well.

And it is quite off topic, but about the approved (by whose authority???) metals we can start a large dicussion.

cob
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Re: Lets test

Post by cob » Thu May 12, 2016 7:27 pm

in 1948 the dutch cent and 5 cent coins were introduced made of bronze.

from wikipedia
In 1948, all half cents and 2 1⁄2 cents were taken out of circulation, though no further production of either denomination had continued after 1940 and 1942, respectively. New bronze 1 and 5 cent coins featuring Queen Wilhelmina on the obverse were issued, phasing out previous types
be water my friend

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Kareltje
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Re: Lets test

Post by Kareltje » Fri May 20, 2016 2:46 am

cob wrote:in 1948 the dutch cent and 5 cent coins were introduced made of bronze.

from wikipedia
In 1948, all half cents and 2 1⁄2 cents were taken out of circulation, though no further production of either denomination had continued after 1940 and 1942, respectively. New bronze 1 and 5 cent coins featuring Queen Wilhelmina on the obverse were issued, phasing out previous types
You are right about the bronze instead of copper. :oops:
And indeed: in 1948 a whole new series of coins was started. The first year with the head of queen Wilhelmina, from 1950 up and including 1980 with the head of queen Juliana. In 1980 queen Beatrix began her reign, with new design. At the same time the cents were taken out of use. In 2001 the Dutch gulden was replaced by the euro with Dutch reverse.
All the time from 1948 till 2001 there was also a bronze 5-cents-piece.

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Alchemist75
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Re: Lets test

Post by Alchemist75 » Thu Aug 31, 2017 9:59 pm

Lava rocks, broken up into little pieces make killer boiling stones and the more porous the better. I keep a whole jar of em that I use and reuse. Usually I boil them in water first then roast em in a metal dish to dry em and burn off any lingering crap. I typically only need 2 or three in my boiler and it holds a nice steady boil. In between runs I clean em with the boil and roast technique. Most of them have been in service for upwards of 5 years. No bumping and no huffing.
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