Changing process after taste testing finished product

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Changing process after taste testing finished product

Postby Canuckwoods » Wed Mar 06, 2019 5:53 am

I have been making whisky for a while now, one thing I would like to be able to do is to adjust my process after tasting the finished product.
I have a batch of HBB that has come of age I find the aroma and palet very good but there is a long burn at the finish what should I have done at the fermentation, distillation, cut, casting etc. to make this better?
But let not keep the discussion to this case how do you change the flavour profile, aroma etc from one finished batch assuming you are following the same procedures recipe.
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Re: Changing process after taste testing finished product

Postby fizzix » Wed Mar 06, 2019 6:35 am

Well Canuckwoods I'm still a newbie but I noticed with my Honey Bear that a diluted sample
right off the spout can be a burner as you describe. However, even just a few months in a small barrel
a (diluted) sample is a much more soothing experience.

Are you casking it too, or sealed jar and chips? Maybe a little barrel "airing" could help you?
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Re: Changing process after taste testing finished product

Postby still_stirrin » Wed Mar 06, 2019 10:03 am

“Where’s the burn”? Is it in the mouth after the swallow? Is it in the chest as it goes down? Is it a “burn” or simply “a warmth”?

If it’s in the mouth as you swallow, I would suspect it is from too much of the heads in your spirit. Tighter, more conservative cuts will help you reduce this problem. Congeners from the ferment such as higher alcohols and solvents will contribute to the “burn” in the mouth. Cutting them out will help eliminate them from your product.

If the burn is more of a chest warming, then I’d believe that it is resulting from high proof alcohol consumption. Diluting to a lower proof for consumption will reduce or eliminate the discomfort. This is not a process or recipe problem, rather more of a “machismo” habit.

Also, if the liquor burns you to the point of discomfort, then it undoubtedly is unhealthy for you to consume it like that. Put a little water with your whiskey over some ice cubes and it’ll be much more “user friendly”. It may also make the whiskey more flavorful by allowing your taste buds to better sense the flavors versus being numbed by higher proof alcohol.

In summary, you’ve asked for some opinions regarding your products irrespective of your tool set or processes. And you’re asking with regard to your perspectives, which obviously any reader would have to assume. So, considering my speculation, the two observations I’ve made from my own experiences are what I’ve tried to relate. I hope it helps with some insight.
ss
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Re: Changing process after taste testing finished product

Postby Canuckwoods » Wed Mar 06, 2019 11:28 am

The "burn" is in the mouth. The HBB is aged in glass with toasted oak 3/4 X 3/4 X 5" staves and has aged for about a year.
How much of the good flavour would be lost by redistilling?
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Re: Changing process after taste testing finished product

Postby NZChris » Wed Mar 06, 2019 3:48 pm

How much air space did you have in the vessel?
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Re: Changing process after taste testing finished product

Postby Canuckwoods » Wed Mar 06, 2019 5:06 pm

about an inch
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Re: Changing process after taste testing finished product

Postby OtisT » Wed Mar 06, 2019 5:20 pm

Is that a pint jar your using with the oak stick?
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Re: Changing process after taste testing finished product

Postby 6 Row Joe » Wed Mar 06, 2019 5:28 pm

What proof are you oaking it at and what proof are you drinking it at? Any 100+ proof whisky is going to have a burn. A little water or a ice chip or two will tone the proof down. If that makes it better you can dilute it to 80 proof or so to smooth it out. Also try some glycerin. You can find it at a drug store. It will smooth the liquor out and sweeten it up too. I have used it before oaking with good results. Use the search feature and read up on how much. Shame on me but I don't think I wrote down how much I added but I think it was a teaspoon per quart.
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Re: Changing process after taste testing finished product

Postby still_stirrin » Wed Mar 06, 2019 5:48 pm

Canuckwoods wrote:The "burn" is in the mouth. The HBB is aged in glass with toasted oak 3/4 X 3/4 X 5" staves and has aged for about a year.
How much of the good flavour would be lost by redistilling?

I wouldn't redistill this batch. Rather, I would leave the stopper out of the decanter for a day or two. You'll lose a little stock, but you'll also lose those heads from the jar.

On the next spirit run, collect into enough jars that you can make good conservative cuts. Don't be so greedy to fill your aging jars. Again, it is your process that needs to be improved.

Is there hope?
ss
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Re: Changing process after taste testing finished product

Postby NZChris » Wed Mar 06, 2019 6:03 pm

Canuckwoods wrote:about an inch

That's not much room for some O2.
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Re: Changing process after taste testing finished product

Postby Yonder » Wed Mar 06, 2019 10:06 pm

I'd guess taking too much heads into your final product, coupled with not letting your whisky breathe did it for you. Give it some air for a while and it will mellow some. Leave more in the feints jar next run. This hobby is like sex; it's damned expensive but practice is fun. Not to mention that nice warm after glow! :wtf:
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Re: Changing process after taste testing finished product

Postby Canuckwoods » Thu Mar 07, 2019 2:55 am

NZChris wrote:
Canuckwoods wrote:about an inch

That's not much room for some O2.

in a quart jar, how much head space should there be?
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Re: Changing process after taste testing finished product

Postby Canuckwoods » Thu Mar 07, 2019 2:58 am

still_stirrin wrote:
Canuckwoods wrote:The "burn" is in the mouth. The HBB is aged in glass with toasted oak 3/4 X 3/4 X 5" staves and has aged for about a year.
How much of the good flavour would be lost by redistilling?

I wouldn't redistill this batch. Rather, I would leave the stopper out of the decanter for a day or two. You'll lose a little stock, but you'll also lose those heads from the jar.

On the next spirit run, collect into enough jars that you can make good conservative cuts. Don't be so greedy to fill your aging jars. Again, it is your process that needs to be improved.

Is there hope?
ss


I thought I had made good cuts but that was a year ago.
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Re: Changing process after taste testing finished product

Postby OtisT » Thu Mar 07, 2019 8:17 am

Hi Canuckwoods.

I can’t taste what your tastin and like others have said, it sure sounds like a bad cut was likely the cause of the burn and bad tastes.

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Last edited by OtisT on Thu Mar 07, 2019 9:26 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Changing process after taste testing finished product

Postby Hilltop » Thu Mar 07, 2019 8:40 am

still_stirrin wrote:“Where’s the burn”? Is it in the mouth after the swallow? Is it in the chest as it goes down? Is it a “burn” or simply “a warmth”?

If it’s in the mouth as you swallow, I would suspect it is from too much of the heads in your spirit. Tighter, more conservative cuts will help you reduce this problem. Congeners from the ferment such as higher alcohols and solvents will contribute to the “burn” in the mouth. Cutting them out will help eliminate them from your product.

If the burn is more of a chest warming, then I’d believe that it is resulting from high proof alcohol consumption. Diluting to a lower proof for consumption will reduce or eliminate the discomfort. This is not a process or recipe problem, rather more of a “machismo” habit.

Also, if the liquor burns you to the point of discomfort, then it undoubtedly is unhealthy for you to consume it like that. Put a little water with your whiskey over some ice cubes and it’ll be much more “user friendly”. It may also make the whiskey more flavorful by allowing your taste buds to better sense the flavors versus being numbed by higher proof alcohol.

In summary, you’ve asked for some opinions regarding your products irrespective of your tool set or processes. And you’re asking with regard to your perspectives, which obviously any reader would have to assume. So, considering my speculation, the two observations I’ve made from my own experiences are what I’ve tried to relate. I hope it helps with some insight.
ss


I second this, they is wisdom in that reply. Machismo! I remember that. It's 90 proof melted on ice now.
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