sweetfeed whisky

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Re: sweetfeed whisky

Postby Wkyshiner » Sun Nov 19, 2017 7:42 pm

Used this for a long time, i always got good shine from it. Last run of this i made was 160 proof. Which i add just a few things to it, far as malt. :crazy:
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Re: sweetfeed whisky

Postby Hanson423 » Tue Dec 05, 2017 2:11 pm

I've read through a lot of this thread. I'm in Oklahoma and I'm not having any luck finding sweet feed or cob without the pellet so I've decided I'll try to make it on my own. I thought I saw someone make a post about this but I can't find it. Does anyone know what the recipe for this would be? Like how much corn,oats,barley and molasses would I use to make this mix? I'll be making a 15-30 gallon ferment. Thanks for any help.
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Re: sweetfeed whisky

Postby Twisted Brick » Tue Dec 05, 2017 2:51 pm

Try here:

viewtopic.php?f=15&t=40655

That's the beauty: you can make up any custom ratios you want. I'd start with 40-50% corn and vary the other ingredients over several batches to get their relative contributions. Just take it easy on the molasses. Buddy of mine just fills up his fermenter to the top and doesn't measure anything. He added a buttload of molasses and all you could taste in his final product was..... molasses.
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Re: sweetfeed whisky

Postby demon00 » Thu Dec 07, 2017 8:53 am

Im planning on doing this recipe with a few mods but only using yeast nutrients and D.A.D.Y. yeast, but the only sweet feed I see is a cob feed with pellets , will this still work ?
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Re: sweetfeed whisky

Postby Antler24 » Thu Dec 07, 2017 2:10 pm

demon00 wrote:Im planning on doing this recipe with a few mods but only using yeast nutrients and D.A.D.Y. yeast, but the only sweet feed I see is a cob feed with pellets , will this still work ?


No. Did you even search?

This has been asked and answered 100 times.
Swedish Pride wrote:
get a brix reading on said ball bearings and then you can find out how much fermentables are in there
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Re: sweetfeed whisky

Postby demon00 » Thu Dec 07, 2017 2:50 pm

Sorry didnt realize it was an issue, ill delete it
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Re: sweetfeed whisky

Postby Hanson423 » Thu Dec 07, 2017 2:52 pm

demon00 wrote:Im planning on doing this recipe with a few mods but only using yeast nutrients and D.A.D.Y. yeast, but the only sweet feed I see is a cob feed with pellets , will this still work ?



Yes according to KS it works just fine. viewtopic.php?f=11&t=15682&start=15
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Re: sweetfeed whisky

Postby Hanson423 » Thu Dec 07, 2017 3:00 pm

I went to a feed store in my town and told them I need sweet feed with no pellets in it. They told me multiple times that it doesn't have any pellets in it.... I get home open the bag. I see in there what looks like little brown pellets... so does anyone know if these are "pellets"? They are small and brown. The brand is bonanza. It's 12% it's says " all natural" on the bag.
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Re: sweetfeed whisky

Postby still_stirrin » Thu Dec 07, 2017 10:09 pm

Hanson423 wrote:I went to a feed store in my town and told them I need sweet feed with no pellets in it. They told me multiple times that it doesn't have any pellets in it.... I get home open the bag. I see in there what looks like little brown pellets... so does anyone know if these are "pellets"? They are small and brown. The brand is bonanza. It's 12% it's says " all natural" on the bag.

Is it this stuff? http://midamericafeeds.com/feed/feedDetail.asp?ID=15

It does look like it will be pelletized.

But this stuff...http://midamericafeeds.com/feed/feedDetail.asp?ID=14 looks like all grains.

But the “little brown pellets” could be molasses balls. Chew on one...does it taste like molly?
ss
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Re: sweetfeed whisky

Postby Hanson423 » Fri Dec 08, 2017 2:08 am

still_stirrin wrote:
Hanson423 wrote:I went to a feed store in my town and told them I need sweet feed with no pellets in it. They told me multiple times that it doesn't have any pellets in it.... I get home open the bag. I see in there what looks like little brown pellets... so does anyone know if these are "pellets"? They are small and brown. The brand is bonanza. It's 12% it's says " all natural" on the bag.

Is it this stuff? http://midamericafeeds.com/feed/feedDetail.asp?ID=15

It does look like it will be pelletized.

But this stuff...http://midamericafeeds.com/feed/feedDetail.asp?ID=14 looks like all grains.

But the “little brown pellets” could be molasses balls. Chew on one...does it taste like molly?
ss


What exactly should molly taste like? I can't say I ever tried that before? Im gonna call them today and hopefully they'll let me return it. I haven't used any yet. I've just opened the bag.
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Re: sweetfeed whisky

Postby trueheart » Fri Dec 08, 2017 6:39 pm

A FRIEND, INDEED. A friend of mine just got back from a trip to Gatlinburg, TN. While there he went on one of the new "moonshine tours". Don't know if I can mention the four distilleries he visited, but he swears that the UJSSM and sweet feed that I make is much better than anything he tasted there. Everyone loves a little praise, but here's the kicker; on his way home he picked up 400 pounds of Producer's Pride All Grain sweet feed, which they quit selling in our state. 8 bags, 400 pounds! Said the guy at the TS he bought it from was grinning. Now that's what friends are for.
You can judge a great whiskey with one sip, but it's best to be thorough.
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Re: sweetfeed whisky

Postby Hanson423 » Sat Dec 09, 2017 12:42 pm

I returned it and was able to get the right stuff!
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Re: sweetfeed whisky

Postby Tapeman » Sat Dec 09, 2017 2:22 pm

Hanson423 wrote:
still_stirrin wrote:
Hanson423 wrote:I went to a feed store in my town and told them I need sweet feed with no pellets in it. They told me multiple times that it doesn't have any pellets in it.... I get home open the bag. I see in there what looks like little brown pellets... so does anyone know if these are "pellets"? They are small and brown. The brand is bonanza. It's 12% it's says " all natural" on the bag.

Is it this stuff? http://midamericafeeds.com/feed/feedDetail.asp?ID=15

It does look like it will be pelletized.

But this stuff...http://midamericafeeds.com/feed/feedDetail.asp?ID=14 looks like all grains.

But the “little brown pellets” could be molasses balls. Chew on one...does it taste like molly?
ss


What exactly should molly taste like? I can't say I ever tried that before? Im gonna call them today and hopefully they'll let me return it. I haven't used any yet. I've just opened the bag.
fermented and distilled, molasses taste is unmistakable. Made some rum and stripped it fast and even after spirit run its still very strong. Give it some oak and it mellows nicely, but it's definitely not a Bacardi style rum, even white.
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Re: sweetfeed whisky

Postby Hanson423 » Sun Dec 10, 2017 4:07 pm

I was trying to figure out how much yeast I should use for my wash. I plan On doing a 20-30 gallon wash ( I've never done a wash this size before). I was doing some searching and according to this https://homedistiller.org/forum/viewtop ... 2&start=12 I should be using 4 grams of yeast per 1 gallon of water. So that would be 80-120 grams of yeast. This seems like a bit much to me? Would 1 package of yeast per 5 gallons work? What are your thoughts on this? Thanks for any help.
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Re: sweetfeed whisky

Postby Tapeman » Sun Dec 10, 2017 7:11 pm

Hanson423 wrote:I was trying to figure out how much yeast I should use for my wash. I plan On doing a 20-30 gallon wash ( I've never done a wash this size before). I was doing some searching and according to this https://homedistiller.org/forum/viewtop ... 2&start=12 I should be using 4 grams of yeast per 1 gallon of water. So that would be 80-120 grams of yeast. This seems like a bit much to me? Would 1 package of yeast per 5 gallons work? What are your thoughts on this? Thanks for any help.
One package per 5 gallons is typical for brewer's or wine making, maybe a little more if using bread yeast. If you start your next batches using spent grain and get right to it you won't need to add more yeast since it will be happy to start right back up again. It's amazing how flavor profiles can be changed just from using different strains of yeast!
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Re: sweetfeed whisky

Postby Bluebros » Mon Jan 01, 2018 2:55 pm

still_stirrin wrote:
Neal wrote:Still_stirrin, thank you for the response. I have not tasted it before fermenting. That's something I need to do I guess. The yeast I use is Fleischmann's Active Dry yeast. I just sprinkle on top and stir when the temp is right. Should I rehydrate?
Well, dry yeast is cells of yeast (single cell structures) which have been dehydrated. All the water has been removed from them. The water keeps the cells from crushing. When you pitch dehydrated yeast into a high sugar content liquid, the liquid will put pressure on the cell walls, and as they're dry and brittle, they may crumble under that external pressure.

Rehydrating restores some of the cell wall's structural integrity, but it also fills the cells with water so the external pressure is balanced by internal pressure and the cells won't burst (or collapse). Some try to rehydrate with a sugar solution, but this too is bad as the sugar again causes undue stress due to the osmotic pressure on the cell walls.

The best thing is to rehydrate with warm water (about your body temperature); sprinkle it onto the surface of the water in a small jar and let it slowly hydrate. It will sink into the water as the cells fill with water. When its all sunk into the water (15-20 minutes), you can gently stir it in the water. You'll likely see a little foam on top of the water which results from wetting pieces and parts of yeast cells that didn't survive rehydration. But that's OK because the rest (in the water) did.

Neal wrote:When I collect the jars label & proof I then cut the heads and tails to the best of my ability. Save the hearts use the rest for the thumper and the next batch. I did put enough together to make a gallon and made some apple pie. I don't care for it to much.
Agree with you here, I don't really care for apple pie either any more. I thought the novelty was good when I first started distilling, but it wore out quickly.

Neal wrote:I want desperately to make good sippen whisky. I haven't got a charred oak barrel yet to age it with. I think the sweet feed liquor needs a lot of improvement.
Well, sweet feed is a good faux-whiskey when processed properly. You've got to make conservative cuts and of course, age it properly on oak. It sounds like you have yet to do that...age it on wood. I think you'll find you like it a whole lot more with some time on wood. Try it, wait, and see.

Neal wrote:I want to try corn I just don't feel like I am ready for that yet. Everything I read about corn liquor seems very complicated.
Have a look at Booner's All Corn recipe...and get some liquid enzymes. Corn is a tough cereal grain if you don't have the right tools, including the knowledge to work with it. Get your basic skills honed before you "jump off into the deep end".

Get some of the sugarheads fermented and run and aging. Then, try some all grain recipes with malted barley (like making beer) so you know the mashing processes. Then, try to step it up with corn. You'll get there.

Good luck and enjoy the venture.
ss


This was incredibly helpful information. I'm cooking the mash right now and I'll be ready to distill next week if all goes well. Following pontiuspylate Youtube video as a guide although I'll be cooking outside. Found a couple of bags of Producer's Pride All-Grain but I had to drive about 30 miles to get it. Everything local only had SF w/ pellets. I have a 5 gal Pot Still and I picked up two 6.5 gal fermenting buckets so I'll have enough wash for maybe 3 runs.

4 inches of Sweet Feed (in a 5 gal bucket) & 4 gal of water. Bringing to a temp of 150 on the stove and cooking for 1 hour

5lbs of pure cane sugar mixed with the wash after filtering out all the grains. Letting the temp cool to 90 degrees

rehydrating 1 packet Red Star "Premier Blanc" yeast into warm water, (95-100 degrees) for 20 mins then mixing into the wash.

Gonna let it sit until it ain't bubbling up. Thinking about 7 days. Then I'll be ready to run next week with about 10 gal of wash so I'll expect to do about 3 runs. Still trying to learn up on how I need to age the shine. So much to read... :ebiggrin:
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Re: sweetfeed whisky

Postby Tapeman » Mon Jan 01, 2018 5:53 pm

Bluebros wrote:
still_stirrin wrote:
Neal wrote:Still_stirrin, thank you for the response. I have not tasted it before fermenting. That's something I need to do I guess. The yeast I use is Fleischmann's Active Dry yeast. I just sprinkle on top and stir when the temp is right. Should I rehydrate?
Well, dry yeast is cells of yeast (single cell structures) which have been dehydrated. All the water has been removed from them. The water keeps the cells from crushing. When you pitch dehydrated yeast into a high sugar content liquid, the liquid will put pressure on the cell walls, and as they're dry and brittle, they may crumble under that external pressure.

Rehydrating restores some of the cell wall's structural integrity, but it also fills the cells with water so the external pressure is balanced by internal pressure and the cells won't burst (or collapse). Some try to rehydrate with a sugar solution, but this too is bad as the sugar again causes undue stress due to the osmotic pressure on the cell walls.

The best thing is to rehydrate with warm water (about your body temperature); sprinkle it onto the surface of the water in a small jar and let it slowly hydrate. It will sink into the water as the cells fill with water. When its all sunk into the water (15-20 minutes), you can gently stir it in the water. You'll likely see a little foam on top of the water which results from wetting pieces and parts of yeast cells that didn't survive rehydration. But that's OK because the rest (in the water) did.

Neal wrote:When I collect the jars label & proof I then cut the heads and tails to the best of my ability. Save the hearts use the rest for the thumper and the next batch. I did put enough together to make a gallon and made some apple pie. I don't care for it to much.
Agree with you here, I don't really care for apple pie either any more. I thought the novelty was good when I first started distilling, but it wore out quickly.

Neal wrote:I want desperately to make good sippen whisky. I haven't got a charred oak barrel yet to age it with. I think the sweet feed liquor needs a lot of improvement.
Well, sweet feed is a good faux-whiskey when processed properly. You've got to make conservative cuts and of course, age it properly on oak. It sounds like you have yet to do that...age it on wood. I think you'll find you like it a whole lot more with some time on wood. Try it, wait, and see.

Neal wrote:I want to try corn I just don't feel like I am ready for that yet. Everything I read about corn liquor seems very complicated.
Have a look at Booner's All Corn recipe...and get some liquid enzymes. Corn is a tough cereal grain if you don't have the right tools, including the knowledge to work with it. Get your basic skills honed before you "jump off into the deep end".

Get some of the sugarheads fermented and run and aging. Then, try some all grain recipes with malted barley (like making beer) so you know the mashing processes. Then, try to step it up with corn. You'll get there.

Good luck and enjoy the venture.
ss


This was incredibly helpful information. I'm cooking the mash right now and I'll be ready to distill next week if all goes well. Following pontiuspylate Youtube video as a guide although I'll be cooking outside. Found a couple of bags of Producer's Pride All-Grain but I had to drive about 30 miles to get it. Everything local only had SF w/ pellets. I have a 5 gal Pot Still and I picked up two 6.5 gal fermenting buckets so I'll have enough wash for maybe 3 runs.

4 inches of Sweet Feed (in a 5 gal bucket) & 4 gal of water. Bringing to a temp of 150 on the stove and cooking for 1 hour

5lbs of pure cane sugar mixed with the wash after filtering out all the grains. Letting the temp cool to 90 degrees

rehydrating 1 packet Red Star "Premier Blanc" yeast into warm water, (95-100 degrees) for 20 mins then mixing into the wash.

Gonna let it sit until it ain't bubbling up. Thinking about 7 days. Then I'll be ready to run next week with about 10 gal of wash so I'll expect to do about 3 runs. Still trying to learn up on how I need to age the shine. So much to read... :ebiggrin:
Aging makes a huge difference in the quality of the shine. We have a cornflakes whiskey made about 16 months ago that was not very good at all so I left it with some oak soaking. At last check it is quite nice now. Someone else said you've got to keep your mitts off it for at least 8 months if you can and that's the difficult part!
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Re: sweetfeed whisky

Postby Firegod74 » Tue Jan 02, 2018 2:49 pm

So I started this recipe on New Years Eve and it took right off. Last night I checked on it and half my grains are floating and the other half are on the bottom. Is this normal? Should I stir it up or will that disturb the yeast or risk infecting the batch too much? I've been dreaming of the day I make a grain mash for years, and don't want to mess this one up now.
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Re: sweetfeed whisky

Postby Tapeman » Tue Jan 02, 2018 3:06 pm

Firegod74 wrote:So I started this recipe on New Years Eve and it took right off. Last night I checked on it and half my grains are floating and the other half are on the bottom. Is this normal? Should I stir it up or will that disturb the yeast or risk infecting the batch too much? I've been dreaming of the day I make a grain mash for years, and don't want to mess this one up now.
Leave it alone. The grains will float and sink then float again, then sink again. The yeast probably is at work in them. Mine did the same thing and now it's all done and the grains sunk.
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Re: sweetfeed whisky

Postby baznkez » Tue Jan 09, 2018 3:19 pm

Hey Guys ,
Has any of use tried ultrasonic aging on this whiskey ????
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Re: sweetfeed whisky

Postby Tapeman » Tue Jan 09, 2018 3:20 pm

baznkez wrote:Hey Guys ,
Has any of use tried ultrasonic aging on this whiskey ????
There is another thread going on Aging, they cover the topics pretty thoroughly
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Re: sweetfeed whisky

Postby baznkez » Tue Jan 09, 2018 5:11 pm

Hey Tape
I know , i was curious to know if anyone has done it on this type of whiskey and how was the outcome , i do it on my molasses rums etc
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Re: sweetfeed whisky

Postby Tapeman » Tue Jan 09, 2018 6:54 pm

baznkez wrote:Hey Tape
I know , i was curious to know if anyone has done it on this type of whiskey and how was the outcome , i do it on my molasses rums etc
It would be worth a try for sure, seems like the stuff never sits long enough to get old.
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Re: sweetfeed whisky

Postby Wild Bill » Sat Feb 17, 2018 10:44 am

Started a batch of this using wet cob mix. It will be the first thing I run through my pot still I am assembling, after a vinegar and sac run of course. Looking at the ingredients of the Cob mix, I was pretty sure none of the grains would convert and they would just add to flavor. I mashed in With 11 gallons of 160 degree water for 29# of cob mix. Temp settled at 145 so I set pid for mash tun to 148 and brought up to 148 and started a recirc mash. After an hour I lautered 22 gallons to the boil pot and started heating to a boil. I checked the gravity before adding the sugar with a refractometer. As I expected, it had a very low gravity of 1.005. I am sure the slight amount was from the molasses but the smell from the grains was outstanding. I stirred in 25# of cane sugar and took another gravity reading of 1.061 pre boil. I boiled for about 25 minutes just to get everything mixed and sanitize my counterflow chiller. I took another gravity reading right at end of boil and got 1.063 from boiling off a bit of liquid. I started recirculating through counterflow chiller until pot temp was at 90 or so and chiller output was 75. I transferred 10.25 gallons of nice clean wort to each of two fermenters. Pitched 5 tablespoons of red star bakers yeast to each fermenter and put in fermentation chamber and set temp to 75 degrees with probe in the wort of one fermenter. Within 3 hrs the air locks were percolating away. I will probably use this batch as the first in an experiment to see if different methods result in a higher initial gravity or result in a better end product. Next up I will probably try striking the cob mix with boiling water and letting soak more like the original recipe. I will take gravity readings before adding sugar to see if any conversion of grains take place although I think the answer will be no. Lastly I will buy the dry Cob mix and run through my grain mill and mash at 148 for an hour and then take a gravity reading to see if any conversion takes place and may add enzymes to promote conversion. I will add molasses and sugar in separately as it reaches boiling temp. For a 4th experiment I may use all fermentable flaked grains mashing at 148 and seeing how many gravity points it adds before adding molasses and cane sugar in boil pot. Should be an enlightening experience for me and maybe get me away from some of my beer brewing habits. Any comments or criticism welcome for this new distiller.
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