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Re: Birdwatchers sugar wash recipe

Posted: Sun Jun 07, 2020 6:38 am
by BoomTown
garnern2 wrote:
Fri Jun 05, 2020 7:08 pm
Since no one gave me a straight up or down opinion on Distiller's Active Dry Yeast in this recipe, and since I ran it a few nights ago and wasn't happy with the results, I decided to make it again. I made a 6 Gal batch then split into two fermenters, one with baker's yeast and one with DADY. We will see how it progresses.
My money’s on the DADY!

Re: Birdwatchers sugar wash recipe

Posted: Sun Jun 07, 2020 6:40 am
by Bushman
Everyone has different tastes, let us know your results not only in taste but production.

Re: Birdwatchers sugar wash recipe

Posted: Sun Jun 07, 2020 4:57 pm
by garnern2
BoomTown wrote:
Sun Jun 07, 2020 6:38 am
garnern2 wrote:
Fri Jun 05, 2020 7:08 pm
Since no one gave me a straight up or down opinion on Distiller's Active Dry Yeast in this recipe, and since I ran it a few nights ago and wasn't happy with the results, I decided to make it again. I made a 6 Gal batch then split into two fermenters, one with baker's yeast and one with DADY. We will see how it progresses.
My money’s on the DADY!
Gotta be honest...I used DADY last time and couldn't get the fermentation to complete. I used straight up spring water this time rather than treated city water, so we'll see what happens. So far, the baker's yeast is actually fermenting more vigorously.

Re: Birdwatchers sugar wash recipe

Posted: Mon Jun 08, 2020 12:33 am
by PoorBoyJack
I have put off mine for now. I have some turbo crap laying around, so I am blasting through it first. Might as well!

Re: Birdwatchers sugar wash recipe

Posted: Mon Jun 08, 2020 1:57 am
by The Baker
PoorBoyJack wrote:
Mon Jun 08, 2020 12:33 am
I have put off mine for now. I have some turbo crap laying around, so I am blasting through it first. Might as well!
Why even bother?

Baker's yeast is so inexpensive.

Geoff

Re: Birdwatchers sugar wash recipe

Posted: Mon Jun 08, 2020 2:33 am
by NZChris
PoorBoyJack wrote:
Mon Jun 08, 2020 12:33 am
I have put off mine for now. I have some turbo crap laying around, so I am blasting through it first. Might as well!
Save it for the day when you have a stuck ferment and everything else you've tried hasn't worked.

Re: Birdwatchers sugar wash recipe

Posted: Thu Jun 18, 2020 10:47 am
by garnern2
Update: there's definitely a difference between the two yeasts, and I'm more impressed by the standard baker's yeast.

Baker's Yeast: Due to the temperature still being close to 90F, my 60F hydrometer actually sinks lower than its lowest marking! The sample was also relatively clear, which could be a contributing factor in the differences. The taste was sour, watery, and slightly acidic with only a slight aroma of tomato.

DADY: It's still slightly above 1.00 with the DADY with no sign of activity, and the yeast is obviously suspended much more than in the baker's yeast sample, which could account for the higher SG, but I doubt it fully accounts for this much of a visible difference on the hydrometer reading. The taste was more nutty and yeasty than its sister batch.

The batches were identical in ingredients and volume. I oxygenated each batch with pure O2 for an identical amount of time. The DADY did perform better this time than it did the last, but I have a hunch it had to do with it being a smaller volume (although this is purely a guess).

I am not going to run these separately since I need to completely cover my element, so this is as far as I can go with the experiment. I'll be using baker's yeast for this from now on. Maybe I have a dud batch of DADY, but that's doubtful. I'm just not impressed with it in general.

Re: Birdwatchers sugar wash recipe

Posted: Thu Jun 18, 2020 11:12 am
by jdetechguy
I really like baker's yeast all around. But, its not so easy to find in these parts of Ohio, USA. DADY is more available through the brew supply shops.

Re: Birdwatchers sugar wash recipe

Posted: Fri Jun 19, 2020 5:54 am
by BoomTown
garnern2 wrote:
Sun Jun 07, 2020 4:57 pm
BoomTown wrote:
Sun Jun 07, 2020 6:38 am
garnern2 wrote:
Fri Jun 05, 2020 7:08 pm
Since no one gave me a straight up or down opinion on Distiller's Active Dry Yeast in this recipe, and since I ran it a few nights ago and wasn't happy with the results, I decided to make it again. I made a 6 Gal batch then split into two fermenters, one with baker's yeast and one with DADY. We will see how it progresses.
My money’s on the DADY!
Gotta be honest...I used DADY last time and couldn't get the fermentation to complete. I used straight up spring water this time rather than treated city water, so we'll see what happens. So far, the baker's yeast is actually fermenting more vigorously.
I’ve now got two small(16L) pots fermenting with DADY. They seem to be taking longer that similar washes in these pots When I USP Ed Red Hat Bakers yeast. I check and record readings everyday, the DADY pots are dropping 6 or 8 points per day, where with Red Hat Bakers yeast they went down 10 or 12 points everyday. Since I’ve only just restarted this
hobby, I haven’t got enough inventory to compare tastes between the out puts, but plan to do that maybe in August, after I have several batches of each aged (as in allowed to air out) 3 or four weeks. I’ll taste test the White, and move the best tasting White to my little 3 Gal Gibbs, and lock down the recipe till I have enough to fill my 10 Gal Gibbs for a 3 year ageing cycle. The other spirit, I plan to age on oak sticks in half gallon jars, and maybe steep in herbs intended to produce a gin.

I’m assuming I’ll be working with a ‘taste neutral’ spirit but we’ll see.

I’m making what I suspect will be a light rum using raw (brown) sugar and Birdwatcher’s recipe. Learning how my new gear works for this project in preparation for making Absynth Later in the fall, after the plants I have on the balcony garden are big enough to harvest.

At any rate, I plan to continue using the DADY as it’s supposed to be able to produce higher ABV from sugar rich washes.

Re: Birdwatchers sugar wash recipe

Posted: Fri Jun 19, 2020 8:17 pm
by garnern2
BoomTown wrote:
Sun Jun 07, 2020 6:38 am
I’ve now got two small(16L) pots fermenting with DADY. They seem to be taking longer that similar washes in these pots When I USP Ed Red Hat Bakers yeast. I check and record readings everyday, the DADY pots are dropping 6 or 8 points per day, where with Red Hat Bakers yeast they went down 10 or 12 points everyday. Since I’ve only just restarted this
hobby, I haven’t got enough inventory to compare tastes between the out puts, but plan to do that maybe in August, after I have several batches of each aged (as in allowed to air out) 3 or four weeks. I’ll taste test the White, and move the best tasting White to my little 3 Gal Gibbs, and lock down the recipe till I have enough to fill my 10 Gal Gibbs for a 3 year ageing cycle. The other spirit, I plan to age on oak sticks in half gallon jars, and maybe steep in herbs intended to produce a gin.

I’m assuming I’ll be working with a ‘taste neutral’ spirit but we’ll see.

I’m making what I suspect will be a light rum using raw (brown) sugar and Birdwatcher’s recipe. Learning how my new gear works for this project in preparation for making Absynth Later in the fall, after the plants I have on the balcony garden are big enough to harvest.

At any rate, I plan to continue using the DADY as it’s supposed to be able to produce higher ABV from sugar rich washes.
I have brewed beer since 2003 and I'm familiar with proper fermentation practices. I have used baker's yeast for meads before, but I had never used DADY. I've now used DADY twice and, for me, it isn't as capable as baker's yeast. The yeast selection for beer, mead, wine, and champagne is incredibly important because the flavor profile relies on it almost exclusively. I don't have enough experience with distilling to know if yeast has the same impact in terms of flavor. Either way, with as little yield as I can get from my 8 gallon boiler, I want the maximum alcohol in a wash without going beyond the threshold of producing off flavors, etc. The last batch (my first) using DADY never finished fermentation--I ended at 1.010. It has an almost cloying but strangely not off-putting sweet flavor, and I made cuts in 8 ounce jars (without being able to find one jar without that particular flavor).

Anyway...the baker's yeast fermented more completely this go-round, and I gave the batches almost 2.5 weeks to finish.

Re: Birdwatchers sugar wash recipe

Posted: Tue Jun 23, 2020 1:04 pm
by linuxrulesok
I've just finished blending my 1st Birdwatchers.

Did a few things differently with this one, this is only my 4th ever batch and 1st birdwatchers. Copper mesh in my column for 1st time.

Did my striping run as normal, but left my cuts from my spirit run to air for 48hrs. This made a massive difference.

I decided to discard more of the fores/heads than I usually do, but the tails from this were quite pleasant and virtually tasteless.

Once I'd discarded what I didn't want I ended up with 75% abv which I'm quite happy with.

Diluted to 37.5% and sampling a glass while writing this and it's so much more pleasant than the first three batches.

I have a question though, will leaving the caps loose and airing help the taste improve?

Re: Birdwatchers sugar wash recipe

Posted: Tue Jun 23, 2020 1:52 pm
by Undies
I was wondering along these lines too. Leaving the lid off (or covered with cloth) a demijohn - will that air it out, or does it need a large mouth?

Re: Birdwatchers sugar wash recipe

Posted: Wed Jun 24, 2020 10:51 am
by BoomTown
garnern2 wrote:
Fri Jun 19, 2020 8:17 pm
BoomTown wrote:
Sun Jun 07, 2020 6:38 am
I’ve now got two small(16L) pots fermenting with DADY. They seem to be taking longer that similar washes in these pots When I USP Ed Red Hat Bakers yeast. I check and record readings everyday, the DADY pots are dropping 6 or 8 points per day, where with Red Hat Bakers yeast they went down 10 or 12 points everyday. Since I’ve only just restarted this
hobby, I haven’t got enough inventory to compare tastes between the out puts, but plan to do that maybe in August, after I have several batches of each aged (as in allowed to air out) 3 or four weeks. I’ll taste test the White, and move the best tasting White to my little 3 Gal Gibbs, and lock down the recipe till I have enough to fill my 10 Gal Gibbs for a 3 year ageing cycle. The other spirit, I plan to age on oak sticks in half gallon jars, and maybe steep in herbs intended to produce a gin.

I’m assuming I’ll be working with a ‘taste neutral’ spirit but we’ll see.

Am beginning to get disenchanted with DADY. FErments that should take 3 or 4 day, are going 6 or 8.

I’m making what I suspect will be a light rum using raw (brown) sugar and Birdwatcher’s recipe. Learning how my new gear works for this project in preparation for making Absynth Later in the fall, after the plants I have on the balcony garden are big enough to harvest.

At any rate, I plan to continue using the DADY as it’s supposed to be able to produce higher ABV from sugar rich washes.
I have brewed beer since 2003 and I'm familiar with proper fermentation practices. I have used baker's yeast for meads before, but I had never used DADY. I've now used DADY twice and, for me, it isn't as capable as baker's yeast. The yeast selection for beer, mead, wine, and champagne is incredibly important because the flavor profile relies on it almost exclusively. I don't have enough experience with distilling to know if yeast has the same impact in terms of flavor. Either way, with as little yield as I can get from my 8 gallon boiler, I want the maximum alcohol in a wash without going beyond the threshold of producing off flavors, etc. The last batch (my first) using DADY never finished fermentation--I ended at 1.010. It has an almost cloying but strangely not off-putting sweet flavor, and I made cuts in 8 ounce jars (without being able to find one jar without that particular flavor).

Anyway...the baker's yeast fermented more completely this go-round, and I gave the batches almost 2.5 weeks to finish.

Re: Birdwatchers sugar wash recipe

Posted: Mon Jul 06, 2020 11:04 am
by rubberduck71
Sailman wrote:
Mon May 25, 2020 4:24 pm
IMG_20200525_201637.jpgIt's day 8 of the birdwatchers fermentation. The cap has fallen and it doesn't appear to have any more activity. So before I take the FG and rack it into a carboy to settle out does this look normal?
I finished my first BW wash last week & got these same "floating islands" of TP remnants. I racked to new bucket, added Turbo Clear & racked again to get a clean wash.

Stripped once & then spirit run through my small pot still. 1st two 100 ml after fores taken off very headsy, but after that had damn near 1000 ml of very nice stuff all the way down to 40%. Heads/tails went into feints jar.

Using it with some local black berries for panty dropper! :thumbup:

Re: Birdwatchers sugar wash recipe

Posted: Tue Jul 07, 2020 2:52 pm
by BoomTown
rubberduck71 wrote:
Mon Jul 06, 2020 11:04 am
Sailman wrote:
Mon May 25, 2020 4:24 pm
IMG_20200525_201637.jpgIt's day 8 of the birdwatchers fermentation. The cap has fallen and it doesn't appear to have any more activity. So before I take the FG and rack it into a carboy to settle out does this look normal?
I finished my first BW wash last week & got these same "floating islands" of TP remnants. I racked to new bucket, added Turbo Clear & racked again to get a clean wash.

Stripped once & then spirit run through my small pot still. 1st two 100 ml after fores taken off very headsy, but after that had damn near 1000 ml of very nice stuff all the way down to 40%. Heads/tails went into feints jar.

Using it with some local black berries for panty dropper! :thumbup:
Good on you guy!

Re: Birdwatchers sugar wash recipe

Posted: Tue Jul 07, 2020 4:33 pm
by Wolfhound
[IMG]//uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/202007 ... ebf7fe.jpg[/IMG]
Have my first batch going today.

Re: Birdwatchers sugar wash recipe

Posted: Thu Jul 09, 2020 5:29 am
by Black Hearts
lilye wrote:
Sun Mar 29, 2020 4:19 pm
I agree with husker. this recipe has less variables than others and as a newbie I am exciting about trying it out. I am sticking to the formula only dividing the ingredients by 4 to give me a yield of about 5 gallons of wash. I have a one gallon "Mr. distiller" table top distiller and want to keep it simple.

My only problem is that my hydrometer shattered into tiny pieces. now that I am living in Panama it is exceedingly difficult to find supplies her. I have ordered another but with everything in the country being frozen indefinitely no telling when it will arrive.

With all this time on my hands I'd like to go ahead and try it anyway. Can I assume that if there is a lot of activity after I pitch the yeast that things will proceed along as they should. I did make a few Uncle Remus' vodka ( hope I recall that correctly) and so that went pretty well for me.

Any advise, comments or suggestions??? Oh, did I mention blue laws are also in affect in this country and have been for most of March?

regards,
Lilye
I'll bring 2 for you when I manage to get home.

SLUGGISH/STUCK Ferment: Birdwatchers

Posted: Mon Jul 13, 2020 3:42 am
by Royco
I feel idiotic posting this as I brewed beer for some years. Done at least a dozen sugar washes of around 20L and so easy. Last week I bought a 45L bucket and did a 1,086 wash but without the tomato paste (used yeast nutrient). PH was a bit high at pitching(7.1) but down to 4.6 after 2 days and stable now. Also used a heat mat as it's winter here, pitching at 35°C and then maintaining at 28 ~ 30°C. This normally goes off like a bag of cats but after 5 days it is bubbling slowly and SG is only at 1,060. Incidentally used Distillamax yeast which handles high alc and tossed in 8 half oyster shells which i never used before.

I have never had to revive a stuck ferment during AG brewing days. Reading up here it appears you can pitch more yeast or maybe champagne yeast.
I'm prepared to be patient but am pissed off because the pricks in power here have announced an immediate ban on all alcohol sales, so I was excited about having double my normal wash capacity. :x

Anyone have an idea what to do?

Re: Birdwatchers sugar wash recipe

Posted: Mon Jul 13, 2020 5:00 am
by still_stirrin
Royco,

You said it is still bubbling, allbeit slowly, right? It’s not stuck (yet). Have you checked the specific gravity? It might be finishing up.

But, doubling your capacity will change the fermenting conditions. If the sugar content (grams per ml) and the yeast density (grams per liter) are the same, or nearly the same, then the potential would be the same as well. However, fermentation would require a longer attenuation as the process is asymptotical as it approaches termination, that is the “rate” of yeast to convert sugars slows as less sugars are available in the volume. So, a larger volume will take longer to fully complete fermentation with all other factors being equal.

Check and record the specific gravity over time, ideally from the beginning of fermentation, and graph it (SG vs days) and you’ll see how the fermentation behaves. But be forewarned....it’s going to take some time to get completely done, ie - a month possibly depending on conditions.

Another factor for yeast viability is indeed, the type and quantity of nutrients, especially in a sugar wash. DAP is a great nutrient to use if you’ve got it. But I recommend using the specified amount (grams per liter) by the manufacturer’s instructions.

Finally, have you “sampled” your wash? Taste will tell you quickly if there is still a lot of sugar unfermented. If it’s sour, then you’re getting close to termination.
ss

Re: Birdwatchers sugar wash recipe

Posted: Mon Jul 13, 2020 7:13 am
by Royco
Thanks for replying SS. The gravity is only down to 1.060 after 5 days. The wash is still sugary. I understand the asymptotic curve and the last 22L BW brew took about 12 days to get below 1000 points. It just seemed to take off faster. Maybe panicking too soon!

Re: Birdwatchers sugar wash recipe

Posted: Mon Jul 13, 2020 7:21 am
by jdetechguy
If its truly stalled and not just slow, you can search previous posts from this recipe, you will find a ton of advice. RAD had a good post that helped me out. Here is the link. Just scroll down and look for RAD14701. We found that the vegetable fertilizer made it run like a bat out of hell, but we got a bit concerned about some of the by products and stopped that fast. DAP gets you the phosphate side of that as SS mentions. Also, we started making yeast starters that seem to help getting a good charge. Have you considered a high krausen after getting the nutrients back?

http://homedistiller.org/forum/viewtopi ... 40&t=38371

Re: Birdwatchers sugar wash recipe

Posted: Mon Jul 13, 2020 8:36 am
by Royco
jdetechguy wrote:
Mon Jul 13, 2020 7:21 am
If its truly stalled and not just slow, you can search previous posts from this recipe, you will find a ton of advice. RAD had a good post that helped me out. Here is the link. Just scroll down and look for RAD14701. We found that the vegetable fertilizer made it run like a bat out of hell, but we got a bit concerned about some of the by products and stopped that fast. DAP gets you the phosphate side of that as SS mentions. Also, we started making yeast starters that seem to help getting a good charge. Have you considered a high krausen after getting the nutrients back?

http://homedistiller.org/forum/viewtopi ... 40&t=38371
Hey jde that is very interesting. I did read up before asking, but this is just behaving differently to the dozen or so BW I've done before.
Of course there are things that are slightly different, being my first 42L wash. I did not factor in the heat buildup of the wash itself and added a reptile pad plus an aquarium heater. The wash heated up above the set temp of 30°C. Could have got to high thirties. Maybe that stunned the yeast.

Really appreciate the input on a subject that must have been asked hundreds of times before. I thought I should know better having brewed AG beer for some years before trying distilling.

Re: Birdwatchers sugar wash recipe

Posted: Mon Jul 13, 2020 9:56 am
by still_stirrin
Royco wrote:
Mon Jul 13, 2020 8:36 am
...The wash heated up above the set temp of 30°C. Could have got to high thirties. Maybe that stunned the yeast...
Well, yeast have “ideal” fermenting conditions. But I’ve found that ale yeasts, including baker’s bread yeasts do extremely well in warmer temperatures. I typically pitch yeast into my wort runoff (yes, I lauter my mashes) as the fermenter is still quite warm to the touch, 100* to 110*F. The yeast is super energetic at that temperature and often is very actively fermenting as I finish runoff to the fermenters.

Yeast will do perfectly fine at human body temperatures, including moderately “feverish” temps. So, I doubt your temp controlled ferment oscillations caused the yeast much threat.

More likely, I suspect a shortfall on nutrients. Potassium is a key nutrient, and readily available in the 10-10-10 fertilizer Rad suggested. Also, nitrogen is another nutrient, although not as important as phosphorus, which DAP excels with. Again, the 10-10-10 is a good alternative to use, and you can usually get a big bag of it at your local hardware/plant store.

A hint here is to pulverize the fertilizer (I use a mortar & pestle) before adding to the boiling water where you pour your sugar. Fertilizer is not very dissolvable in water, so grinding it to a powder and adding to the hot water will help hydrate the minerals.
Royco wrote:
Mon Jul 13, 2020 8:36 am
...Really appreciate the input on a subject that must have been asked hundreds of times before. I thought I should know better having brewed AG beer for some years before trying distilling.
Yes, your homebrewing experience is a valuable asset. However, grain (or extract) recipes are an easier target as the grains bring a lot of the nutrients along with them that the yeast needs. I guess that’s why beer brewing (and drinking) is so widespread worldwide for generations. All that “goodness” is built into the products and processes.

And keep in mind that the distilling hobby is really an extension of your brewing hobby. You learn the brewery processes (kindergarten thru senior high) and distilling is the graduate education.

Enjoy. Read and learn as you go.
ss

Re: Birdwatchers sugar wash recipe

Posted: Mon Jul 13, 2020 10:06 am
by Saltbush Bill
Birdwatchers is a T and T recipe and contains tomatoe paste as part of the recipe.
This seems to be a question about something called Roycos DAP Wash, why is it even in this thread?

Re: Birdwatchers sugar wash recipe

Posted: Mon Jul 13, 2020 2:14 pm
by Royco
still_stirrin wrote:
Mon Jul 13, 2020 9:56 am
Royco wrote:
Mon Jul 13, 2020 8:36 am
...The wash heated up above the set temp of 30°C. Could have got to high thirties. Maybe that stunned the yeast...
Well, yeast have “ideal” fermenting conditions. But I’ve found that ale yeasts, including baker’s bread yeasts do extremely well in warmer temperatures. I typically pitch yeast into my wort runoff (yes, I lauter my mashes) as the fermenter is still quite warm to the touch, 100* to 110*F. The yeast is super energetic at that temperature and often is very actively fermenting as I finish runoff to the fermenters.

Yeast will do perfectly fine at human body temperatures, including moderately “feverish” temps. So, I doubt your temp controlled ferment oscillations caused the yeast much threat.

More likely, I suspect a shortfall on nutrients. Potassium is a key nutrient, and readily available in the 10-10-10 fertilizer Rad suggested. Also, nitrogen is another nutrient, although not as important as phosphorus, which DAP excels with. Again, the 10-10-10 is a good alternative to use, and you can usually get a big bag of it at your local hardware/plant store.

A hint here is to pulverize the fertilizer (I use a mortar & pestle) before adding to the boiling water where you pour your sugar. Fertilizer is not very dissolvable in water, so grinding it to a powder and adding to the hot water will help hydrate the minerals.
Royco wrote:
Mon Jul 13, 2020 8:36 am
...Really appreciate the input on a subject that must have been asked hundreds of times before. I thought I should know better having brewed AG beer for some years before trying distilling.
Yes, your homebrewing experience is a valuable asset. However, grain (or extract) recipes are an easier target as the grains bring a lot of the nutrients along with them that the yeast needs. I guess that’s why beer brewing (and drinking) is so widespread worldwide for generations. All that “goodness” is built into the products and processes.

And keep in mind that the distilling hobby is really an extension of your brewing hobby. You learn the brewery processes (kindergarten thru senior high) and distilling is the graduate education.

Enjoy. Read and learn as you go.
ss
Much appreciated.

Re: Birdwatchers sugar wash recipe

Posted: Mon Jul 13, 2020 2:15 pm
by Royco
Saltbush Bill wrote:
Mon Jul 13, 2020 10:06 am
Birdwatchers is a T and T recipe and contains tomatoe paste as part of the recipe.
This seems to be a question about something called Roycos DAP Wash, why is it even in this thread?
OOPS!

Re: Birdwatchers sugar wash recipe

Posted: Thu Jul 23, 2020 6:10 am
by BoomTown
Boy did I screw this cycle of BW up. Left 2 of my small (16 L) batches out on the balcony and went away for a week’s vacation. Temps here in DC Metro area jumped to above 95F all the week we were gone. Both washes stalled out. Re dosed them with Miricle grow and Epsom salts, added more yeast, and moved them into the house. Their Temp inside is constant at 78F now. Hoping they’ll wake up again in a couple days. What with that and having Shingles all through the vacation, not a good month so far.

Re: Birdwatchers sugar wash recipe

Posted: Mon Jul 27, 2020 12:14 am
by Royco
Royco wrote:
Mon Jul 13, 2020 2:15 pm
Saltbush Bill wrote:
Mon Jul 13, 2020 10:06 am
Birdwatchers is a T and T recipe and contains tomatoe paste as part of the recipe.
This seems to be a question about something called Roycos DAP Wash, why is it even in this thread?
OOPS!
OK, got all the stuff to do a 76L now and will follow BW precisely.
My 42L hybrid (more like a Shady) was dumped this morning. After 2 weeks added champagne yeast and nutrient. After another week added 5 packs bakers yeast. Got down to 1050 and stuck there. Smells like vomit so must be infected.
Reason for posting this here is, I don't think the recipe was the problem as this could happen with any recipe if you are careless.
I have seen so much about oyster shells so got some from the local restaurant. Even having boiled them in water they still had stuff on them and I'm sure that was one of the culprits. Also, the brew got up to around 40° first night with heating pads and spontaneous heat of the product.

So this time will do the T&T BW and will pitch in the morning so the temp can be monitored.
In 5 years of brewing and 4 months distilling this is my first stalled ferment.

Re: Birdwatchers sugar wash recipe

Posted: Mon Jul 27, 2020 12:38 am
by NZChris
Royco wrote:
Mon Jul 27, 2020 12:14 am
Smells like vomit so must be infected.
Next time you smell vomit, search the forum before you kick the can over.

Re: Birdwatchers sugar wash recipe

Posted: Mon Jul 27, 2020 1:02 am
by Royco
NZChris wrote:
Mon Jul 27, 2020 12:38 am
Royco wrote:
Mon Jul 27, 2020 12:14 am
Smells like vomit so must be infected.
Next time you smell vomit, search the forum before you kick the can over.
Yes Chris I read a lot and some posters recommend just running it anyway.But at 4,5% I thought it was a big job running 42L just to get 2L out so I'm doing a 76L now following BW properly and should have it ready in a week or so.
Thanks for the advice.