Bourbon help

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larisk
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Bourbon help

Post by larisk » Mon Oct 11, 2010 8:46 pm

Hi guys

i've been doing sugar washes for the last 12 months now and while i love the product that i'm making i wanted to try my hand at making a bourbon. only prooblem is that i cant find any recipes for "bourbon". i know that it is done from a corn mash and that traditionally its aged for years in barrels but i can't find anything for homebrew bourbon. maybe i'm just looking in the wrong places.
i was hoping someone could point me in the right direction.

cheers

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Re: Bourbon help

Post by blind drunk » Mon Oct 11, 2010 8:59 pm

http://homedistiller.org/forum/viewtopi ... 25&start=0

http://homedistiller.org/forum/viewtopi ... 11&t=12289

Parent Site's got some extensive discussion and recipe variations. Good luck, bd.

Also, look using "sour mash."
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Re: Bourbon help

Post by rubber duck » Mon Oct 11, 2010 9:25 pm

Bourbon is more of a process then a recipe. It must contain 51% corn or more. A typical grain bill will be something like this; 70% corn, 20% malted barley,and 10% rye or somtimes wheat. It must be aged on a new chard barrel. Technically as long as it's at least 51% corn you can get creative. There is no sugar added to bourbon.

The process part is something I don't have time to get into tonight, but it involves cooking the corn and converting the start to sugar, using the enzymes contained in the malt barley.
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WalkingWolf
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Re: Bourbon help

Post by WalkingWolf » Tue Oct 12, 2010 1:59 am

As RD pointed out Bourbon is a rather convaluted process -- up to and including legally protected naming rights with rigid rules and regulations for its use.

Now, if what you're looking for is simply a "Bourbon-like" liquor that is not overly complicated with a rather simple process that even a novice can produce -- then the UJSSM thread is what you are looking for. Aged with a little oak and you will have yourself a nice tasting liquor of your own doing. My personal preference is corn with rye and oats. There are many variations within the thread though.

good stillin

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Re: Bourbon help

Post by decomissioned » Tue Oct 12, 2010 9:25 am

WalkingWolf wrote:As RD pointed out Bourbon is a rather convaluted process -- up to and including legally protected naming rights with rigid rules and regulations for its use.
The two hardest requirements to meet (at least for me) would be the expense in getting a new charred oak barrel, and keeping my mitts off it for two years! :D But they aren't all that difficult if you really wanted "Bourbon". Thankfully it isn't geographically restrictive, other than United States.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bourbon_whiskey" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;" rel="nofollow

"Bourbon is an American whiskey, a type of distilled spirit, made primarily from corn (maize) and named for Bourbon County, Kentucky. It has been produced since the 18th century. While it may be made anywhere in the United States, it is strongly associated with the Commonwealth of Kentucky."

On May 4, 1964, the United States Congress recognized Bourbon Whiskey as a "distinctive product of the United States." The Federal Standards of Identity for Distilled Spirits (27 C.F.R. 5.22) state that bourbon must meet these requirements:
  • Bourbon must be made of a grain mixture that is at least 51% corn.[1]
    Bourbon must be distilled to no more than 160 (U.S.) proof (80% alcohol by volume).
    Neither coloring nor flavoring may be added.
    Bourbon must be aged in new, charred oak barrels. [1]
    Bourbon must be entered into the barrel at no more than 125 proof (62.5% alcohol by volume).
    Bourbon, like other whiskeys, may not be bottled at less than 80 proof (40% alcohol by volume.)
Bourbon which meets the above requirements and has been aged for a minimum of two years, may (but is not required to) be called Straight Bourbon.[2]
Straight Bourbon aged for a period less than four years must be labeled with the duration of its aging.
If an age is stated on the label, it must be the age of the youngest whiskey in the bottle.
Only whiskey produced in the United States can be called bourbon.[3]

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Re: Bourbon help

Post by NcHooch » Tue Oct 12, 2010 2:05 pm

Try this:


this is my Carolina Bourbon I oaked for 6 months....and it's fine tastin'

Start with 7 pounds of cracked corn, n cook in 4 gallons of water for at least an hour (i usually go 90 mins) ....careful not to burn it. Then cool to exactly 150f. Pour into a large cooler (helps conserve heat) and add the
3 pounds of 6-row malted barly ...The temp should drop to approx 145f...stir well every 15 mins, while you
mash for 2-3 hours. Keep covered.

* Note: Don't add malted barley to the corn if it exceeds 155f! the enzymes will be denatured in short order and and you won't get no conversion.the mashing process requires that you keep the mash at 145f +/- 5f for the entire duration of the mash which is why you use the insulated cooler. If you want, you can add a lil beano for additional conversion... (we'll look the other way) ...and let it continue to mash overnight.

At the end of the mash, cool to 80f and transfer to fermenter (grain and all). Top up to 6-7 gallons, Aerate and pitch yeast. Ferment for a week on grain with Prestige WD or your favorite yeast. After fermentation is complete, strain out grain, and transfer to boiler. I distilled with my Bok (removed a lil packing )....make appropriate cuts and dilute final spirits to 60% abv.

I oaked at 60% with 2 pcs of my own new charred white oak sticks for 6 months in a glass jar (once again, we'll look the other way if you dont have a barrel). As long as you're using new charred white oak I think you can call it Bourbon.
Once your agin'/oaking is complete, dilute down to 45% and bottle.
P1110100000.jpg
It was full until I poured a sample. :ewink:

That's right, No sugar, just corn n barley. it's not that hard, just takes patience.

feel free to gimme a yell if you have any questions

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rubber duck
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Re: Bourbon help

Post by rubber duck » Tue Oct 12, 2010 2:38 pm

That looks like a solid recipe and process, NC Hootch.

Adding a handful of malt during the cooking when it get thick will loosen it up and make it easier to stir. Substituting a pound of malted white wheat for a pound of barely malt will give almost the enzymatic power, and will take the edge off it If you can't wait 6 months.
Ideas are like rabbits. You get a couple and learn how to handle them, and pretty soon you have a dozen. John Steinbeck

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Re: Bourbon help

Post by NcHooch » Tue Oct 12, 2010 6:04 pm

rubber duck wrote:That looks like a solid recipe and process, NC Hootch.

Adding a handful of malt during the cooking when it get thick will loosen it up and make it easier to stir. Substituting a pound of malted white wheat for a pound of barely malt will give almost the enzymatic power, and will take the edge off it If you can't wait 6 months.
Solid advice on the pre-malting there RD , i've tried that a couple times and it works nice.
I'll hafta try the white wheat as well , sometimes I feel the need to sample prematurely :wink:
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Re: Bourbon help

Post by MuleKicker » Tue Oct 12, 2010 6:16 pm

After fermentation is complete, strain out grain, and transfer to boiler.

do you rack and let clear before stillin?
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Re: Bourbon help

Post by rubber duck » Tue Oct 12, 2010 6:29 pm

I put mine through a wine press and immediately run it. I like to run it dirty, it gives the whiskey more caricature.

A lot of folks will dump the grain and all right into the still, but it's hard to do that on a direct fired rig.
Ideas are like rabbits. You get a couple and learn how to handle them, and pretty soon you have a dozen. John Steinbeck

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Re: Bourbon help

Post by NcHooch » Wed Oct 13, 2010 4:41 pm

MuleKicker wrote:
After fermentation is complete, strain out grain, and transfer to boiler.

do you rack and let clear before stillin?
I dump it from the fermenter through a 5 gal nylon paint strainer bag, let it drain for a bit, give it a few good squeezes to get the last of the corn n barley goodness out, and then run it dirty just like RD does ... need to preserve the "character".

yall should give it a shot. I find all-grain hooch has a totally differnt flavor profile than the UJSSM (as much as I like that) ...I recon RD would say the same.

NChooch
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King Of Hearts
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Re: Bourbon help

Post by King Of Hearts » Wed Oct 13, 2010 5:37 pm

Bourbon is made with a potstill. Some bourbon makers use a continuous still. After you decide on your recipe or wash, ferment between 6% to 8%abv at 80 degrees with the grain, when done separate, rack off and clear. Maybe two weeks time. You will do two separate runs. A stripping run is done as fast as you can collecting 1/3 of the volume, around 25-30% abv. Then the first run is loaded back into the potstill for the second run or spirit run. The first 100ml of a 20L wash or foreshots are disgaurded because they contain methanol. The next part coming out are the heads. These contain cogeners or flavors that part of will be mixed with the hearts which come next. Keep these in seperate jars for mixing later. Collect these until the spirit drops to 80% abv. Next the hearts will be coming out or pure ethanol down to 60%. Some people go lower maybe 58% or 55%. The next part are the tails. Keep these in a seperate jar too collecting down to 40% or a bit lower. The heads and tails can be added to your next spirit run to clean them up. Age with American White Oak sticks at least 3/8 thick, medium to medium + toast level or alligator charred for at least 2 months, longer if you can wait. How much of the heads and tails you add to your bourbon and the recipe and aging is where the art lies.

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Re: Bourbon help

Post by MuleKicker » Wed Oct 13, 2010 6:00 pm

How much of the heads and tails you add to your bourbon and the recipe and aging is where the art lies
Im still trying to figger that one out. I got some stuff sittin now that dont quite taste right. I thought it was cause i didnt clear my wash enough. Now you guys got me thinkin. It is gettin better with age, but it still has a non whiskey flavor mixed in. cant figger out what. it came out the still, i was so happy with the taste, then it started changing. My next wash is gonna be a mixed grain ujsm style. hopefully i am more pleased with it. :?
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Re: Bourbon help

Post by rubber duck » Wed Oct 13, 2010 10:49 pm

The way I do my cuts depends on how long I'm going to age it if at all. If I'm doing a run that I will keep white I'm brutal with the cuts. If it's something I'm going to barrel for a year+ I go into the tails until there is a noticeable funk throughout the batch. The tails will age and make it a better whiskey. I don't like much heads but I usually take just the fist part of the heads and blend it into the batch. That sweet first part of the heads is what I'm talking about. You can age through tails but heads are a different matter. To much heads and you get that chemical smell that stays even with years of aging.

All grain is in my opinion the easiest way to make a outstanding whiskey. Most folks find it to be a frustrating learning curve but it's a worth while endeavor.
Ideas are like rabbits. You get a couple and learn how to handle them, and pretty soon you have a dozen. John Steinbeck

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