Your thoughts on this recipe.

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hoochinoo
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Your thoughts on this recipe.

Post by hoochinoo » Wed Apr 09, 2008 4:44 pm

A while ago searching the internet I came across the following recipe from a web site that I have lost the link to. I thought I can post it to get your opinion on this one:

Whiskey

INGREDIENTS:
10 lbs. Whole kernel corn, untreated
5 Gallons Water
1 Cup Yeast, champagne yeast starter


DIRECTIONS:
Put corn in a burlap bag and wet with warm water. Place bag in a warm dark place and keep moist for about ten days. When the sprouts are about a 1/4" long the corn is ready for the next step. Wash the corn in a tub of water, rubbing the sprouts and roots off.. Throw the sprouts and roots away and transfer the corn into your primary fermenter. With a pole or another hard object mash the corn, make sure all kernels are cracked. Next add 5 gallons of boiling water and when the mash cools add yeast. Seal fermenter and vent with a water sealed vent. Fermentation will take 7-10 days. When fermentation is done, pour into still filtering through a pillow case to remove all solids.

As presented, this recipe does not use any sugars and relies solely on the corn malt.

If this can be done, wouldn't barley be a better choice to use instead of corn?

Thanks for your feed back.

Old_Blue
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Post by Old_Blue » Wed Apr 09, 2008 4:49 pm

hoochinoo,

I don't mean no harm but you are reinventing the wheel. This has been done every since the European settles discovered maize growing in the new world.

It's called corn likker.

I bet them ol boys Goose knows has made a bunch of it.

Dooley's daddy and grandpa kept from starving to death during the depression due to it.
Fire is the devil’s only friend - Don McLean
Jump in where you can and hang on - Brisco Darling

nutmg1
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Post by nutmg1 » Wed Apr 09, 2008 4:54 pm

I'm curious what the starting SG would be on this.

Dnderhead
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Post by Dnderhead » Wed Apr 09, 2008 5:15 pm

not knowing much about it but Id wait till them sprouts are about 1 inch long

Old_Blue
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Post by Old_Blue » Wed Apr 09, 2008 5:26 pm

I'm curious what the starting SG would be on this.
Very low , like Chicha.

It can be kicked up by adding this 10 lbs to another 20 that has been boiled and then cooled to about 160f and let sit for a couple of hours. About 5~8% depending on the strain of corn.
Fire is the devil’s only friend - Don McLean
Jump in where you can and hang on - Brisco Darling

pintoshine
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Post by pintoshine » Wed Apr 09, 2008 5:35 pm

your water to corn ration needs to be kept between 2 liters/ kg to 3 liters/kg this will give you an sg from 1.080 to 1.050.

hoochinoo
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Post by hoochinoo » Thu Apr 10, 2008 5:42 am

I am hoping that sprouts would come out at all since the corn is feed grade and a hybrid. The guy at the feed store did not have any specific information and finally asked me why I wanted to germinated the seeds. So I had to drop the subject. I will try to germinate and try this recipe then.

If this method can produce desirable results at the end, some good hooch, and not having to use any sugars. I will be pleased.

thanks.

Dnderhead
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Post by Dnderhead » Thu Apr 10, 2008 6:21 am

If it has not bin heat dried it will sprout just the corn it produced if any
would be unpredictable hybreds sometimes revert back to somthing they were
bread with

pintoshine
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Post by pintoshine » Thu Apr 10, 2008 7:33 am

If this method can produce desirable results at the end, some good hooch, and not having to use any sugars. I will be pleased.
Be prepared for big flavor from this. It has about three times the flavor of any sugar based wash. I usually run this stuff twice through two thumping pots and it is still strong. It can handle lots and lots of oak. This is one of my personal favorites.

spiritsofcatemaco
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Post by spiritsofcatemaco » Thu Apr 10, 2008 8:04 am

what about making a sour mash with this recipet?

Uncle Remus
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Post by Uncle Remus » Thu Apr 10, 2008 8:33 am

I wouldn't use boiling water. Boiling water might kill a lot of the enzymes in the malted corn. You should read about cooking mash. The best temperature for starch conversion is around 66.5°C.
Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day. Teach a man to fish and he will sit in a boat all day and drink beer.

hoochinoo
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Post by hoochinoo » Fri Apr 11, 2008 8:11 am

2 liters/ kg to 3 liters/kg this will give you an sg from 1.080 to 1.050.
Where is your source of info from? Have you actually tried this?

What yeast did you use? In the recipe, I guess, would EC-1118 be the one they are referring to?

Because this would really be something to achieve that high of SG. :shock:

Dnderhead
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Post by Dnderhead » Fri Apr 11, 2008 8:28 am

If your using all corn "malt" all of it corn does not have much enzymes
(should test small amount first)

hoochinoo
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Post by hoochinoo » Sat Apr 12, 2008 5:37 am

If your using all corn "malt" all of it corn does not have much enzymes
That is why I am curious about Barley.
Based on the research, it seems to have more of the appetizing enzymes for the yeast.

Dnderhead
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Post by Dnderhead » Sat Apr 12, 2008 6:54 am

Enzymes convert starches to sugars then yeast use sugar to make alcohol . Corn is low in enzymes has just about enough to convert its self.
others as barley have more than Enough so will convert 3-4 times as much
other gran as well. "home made " malt is not as high in enzymes as
commercial
the grain is is bread for grain
not malt but it does work if you want to spend the time and much cheaper (about .50lb ) and you can make malts you can not buy
( as corn)

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