lemoncello

Treatment and handling of your distillate.

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sherriff Buffoerd pusser
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lemoncello

Post by sherriff Buffoerd pusser » Tue Oct 31, 2006 7:46 pm

I was wanting to know if anyone made this. I think it is infused with lemon peel.Can I do this with valved and put peels in gin pot and add sugar when its throug distilling or would it be better to just soak it on peels and sugar?
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Post by Marionette » Tue Oct 31, 2006 8:16 pm

I think limoncello is made by macerating lemon peel (not pith) in alcohol (sometimes grappa). It doesn't need distilling. I would have a search online for "limoncello recipe" and compare various sources.

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Post by pothead » Tue Oct 31, 2006 8:25 pm

I make my version by soaking lemon peel(without the white pith) in high proof for a few weeks, then adding suagr to taste.
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Post by sherriff Buffoerd pusser » Tue Oct 31, 2006 8:40 pm

guy that ask me to make some had a bottle tonight 29per abv would I cut it then soak or just soak then cut.he said ha thouhgt it was infused I dont know just want to make him some if I can.I had strong lemon taste and smell and was very sweet.
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Post by pothead » Wed Nov 01, 2006 10:04 am

The last store bought lemoncello I had was 40%abv . I like mine higher....If you want it lower, cut it to 40%, then soak the lemon peels in it, then add the sugar to taste. The sugar will help bring the proof down.
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Post by Rocky_Creek » Wed Nov 01, 2006 12:20 pm

Sugar does not bring the proof down to speak of, what it does is change the specific gravity.
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Post by Marionette » Wed Nov 01, 2006 1:44 pm

Well, it would bring down the percentage of alcohol, but not the total amount of alcohol present.

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Post by possum » Thu Nov 02, 2006 6:16 am

Marionette
Sugar does not change volume very much.
It does change density, but Rocky's statement is closest to true.
However... when I add sugar to hootch, I add simple syrup (sugar disolved in h2o). To keep track of your proof when adding sugar, calculate %abv before adding stuff... then find total amount of alcohol in the container,
then after adding sweetner, check the new total volume, and use %abv=(volume of pure alcohol)/(new total volume).


This is trickey if you are adding lots of different ingredients, and do too much tasting at different stages. If that happens, then the flametest is about the only thing left to use without a lab.

Cheers...good luck with lemoncello
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Post by pothead » Thu Nov 02, 2006 10:38 am

abv = alcohol by volume.
if you change the volume by adding something other than alcohol it is changing the abv.

take 500ml of 100 proof booze, add 250ml of ANYTHING that is non-alcoholic(doesn't matter if it is water,sugar,or anything), and you will significantly change the abv.
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Post by junkyard dawg » Thu Nov 02, 2006 5:15 pm

Pothead, take a cup of hot water and dissolve 1/2 cup of sugar in it. Do you have 1 1/2 cups of syrup, or one cup, or something in between?

heck, I have to go try this myself... I think that the volume doesn't change much as long as the sugar is dissolved. off to the kitchen...

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Post by Miraculix » Fri Nov 03, 2006 12:40 am

For every "unit" of pure sugar, you get 0.63 "units" of liquid sugar.

1 kg pure sugar = 0.63 liters of liquid sugar.

Calculating backwards: 1 liter of liquid sugar = 1/0.63 = 1.59 kg of pure sugar.

Sorry for using the metric system.

Adding anything that is dissolvable in alcohol to your booze, will change
the %abv somewhat.

/Miraculix

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Post by pothead » Fri Nov 03, 2006 4:21 am

Miraculix wrote:For every "unit" of pure sugar, you get 0.63 "units" of liquid sugar.

1 kg pure sugar = 0.63 liters of liquid sugar.

Calculating backwards: 1 liter of liquid sugar = 1/0.63 = 1.59 kg of pure sugar.

Sorry for using the metric system.

Adding anything that is dissolvable in alcohol to your booze, will change
the %abv somewhat.

/Miraculix
Thanks.
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Post by pothead » Fri Nov 03, 2006 4:30 am

junkyard dawg wrote:Pothead, take a cup of hot water and dissolve 1/2 cup of sugar in it. Do you have 1 1/2 cups of syrup, or one cup, or something in between?

heck, I have to go try this myself... I think that the volume doesn't change much as long as the sugar is dissolved. off to the kitchen...
Try 2 things. first put 500ml booze into a 750ml bottle......then add 2 cups sugar(undisolved)...what happens??? wow, the alcohol rises to the top......ok....yeah, I know.......your gonna say it was undisolved......well, now shake it till it is disolved....WOW, the volume did not change between the un disolved and the disolved sugar.

(not trying to bash)...but think about it...1 cup of sugar disolved to a syrup itsnt 1 cup....and why? because it also has AIR in it due to the shape of the crystals...BUT it will still take up as much volume as it does when it is disolved.
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Post by junkyard dawg » Fri Nov 03, 2006 7:50 am

Pothead, I agree with what you're saying. I'm saying that for calculation, you can't just add the volume of dry sugar. I just put one cup of sugar into one and a half cups of water and have 2 cups of syrup. does that mean that half the volume of dry sugar is airspace? Miraculix answered that I think...

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Post by Husker » Fri Nov 03, 2006 8:26 am

junkyard dawg
Pothead, I agree with what you're saying. I'm saying that for calculation, you can't just add the volume of dry sugar. I just put one cup of sugar into one and a half cups of water and have 2 cups of syrup. does that mean that half the volume of dry sugar is airspace? Miraculix answered that I think...

didn't mean to get you riled
Not entirely. There are two reasons that when adding sugar to water you wont end up with a 1+1=2 situation.

First, as you have stated, there is air space in the sugar (between the granules). This is probably 10 to 20% (someone might be able to post a closer guess). The second reason, is that the sugar H2O and sugar molecules are not the same size. Thus, you end up the same situation you would with 2 different sized ball bearings. If you take a gallon of 2 inch balls, and add a gallon of .5 inch balls, you will end up with less than 2 gallons, since you will have less wasted space between the balls (the smaller ones fill in some of this original wasted space).

This is also partly why the SG goes up. The weight of sugar is slightly more than that of water (I think). But some increase also comes from the fact that the "matter" in the solution is actually more dense (i.e. less wasted "space" in the mix.

So what you get when adding sugar to water is 10-15% air space which of course does not end up in the solution, and say 20-25% space reduction due to different sized molecules fitting together in a tighter way. Thus, you get 1 cup + 1 cup == 1.5 cups (from your statement, as I have not tested this volume change myself).

NOTE I am not sure if this ratio is correct, or if the "ratio" stays the same when you continue to add more sugar. At some point, I would bet that much or most of the "wasted" space is used up, and then adding a cup of sugar might add .7 cups to the overall volume (or even more). I have not tested this, however. Also, I believe that you can add some sugar to a water mix, without adding any volume at all (not 100% sure, but I am dredging this from long forgotten memories of chemistry class).

NOTE, I do not know if this volume 1+1 != 2 holds up when adding to ethanol. But usually in mixed flavored drink, there is enough water that the ethanol should not play a factor. It could be that volume in ethanol end up being 1+1 == 2 when adding sugar.

H.

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Post by pothead » Fri Nov 03, 2006 8:35 am

If you figure it out that way then yes....the amount of space in a cup of sugar is taken up with ALOT more air than you would think.
It is alot like filling a cup with sand, then pouring water into it. it appears that the cup is full when it is just the sand in there...but it can still hold quite a bit of water.
volume is volume is volume no matter how you look at it.
you add something of volume(that has no alcohol in it) to something that has alcohol in it and the %abv will change because the volume changes, but the amout of alcohol does not. It doesn't matter if it is sugar,water,syrup,glycerin,or piss :lol: .
when you add sugar, you are diluting your product.

Lately I have been making alot of sugary drinks with essential oils, and I have been adding my sugar(dry) into the bottles that already have the booze in them, the liquid rises to the top of the bottle. I cap it off and shake it until it is disolved. Once it is disolved, the volume inside the bottle does not change(because the air is replaced with the booze).
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Post by junkyard dawg » Fri Nov 03, 2006 8:35 am

"Also, I believe that you can add some sugar to a water mix, without adding any volume at all (not 100% sure, but I am dredging this from long forgotten memories of chemistry class). "

That was in the back of my mind as well. I started to say that its not a linear relationship but wasn't sure if that was the right term.

Anyway, Lemoncello is really tasty. Using a vegetable peeler is a good way to get just the outer rind off the lemon without getting the bitter pith.

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Post by pothead » Fri Nov 03, 2006 8:41 am

junkyard dawg wrote:"Also, I believe that you can add some sugar to a water mix, without adding any volume at all (not 100% sure, but I am dredging this from long forgotten memories of chemistry class). "

That was in the back of my mind as well. I started to say that its not a linear relationship but wasn't sure if that was the right term.

Anyway, Lemoncello is really tasty. Using a vegetable peeler is a good way to get just the outer rind off the lemon without getting the bitter pith.
I love the stuff too. Sometimes I use lime shavings in it too, along with the lemon.
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Post by Husker » Fri Nov 03, 2006 8:57 am

pothead
If you figure it out that way then yes....the amount of space in a cup of sugar is taken up with ALOT more air than you would think.
It is alot like filling a cup with sand, then pouring water into it. it appears that the cup is full when it is just the sand in there...but it can still hold quite a bit of water.
Comparing sugar/water and sand/water does not quite work. Sugar disolves, and goes INTO the solution. There are changes. Sand does not, and simply "displaces" an equal amount of water. For the sand, it take 100% volume (minus "hidden" air). Sugar does not behave that way

But yes, adding sugar will modify the volume. Also, you have NOT increased the volume of ethanol, so your ABV will drop.

H.

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Post by pothead » Fri Nov 03, 2006 9:31 am

pothead
If you figure it out that way then yes....the amount of space in a cup of sugar is taken up with ALOT more air than you would think.
It is alot like filling a cup with sand, then pouring water into it. it appears that the cup is full when it is just the sand in there...but it can still hold quite a bit of water.
Comparing sugar/water and sand/water does not quite work. Sugar disolves, and goes INTO the solution. There are changes. Sand does not, and simply "displaces" an equal amount of water. For the sand, it take 100% volume (minus "hidden" air). Sugar does not behave that way

But yes, adding sugar will modify the volume. Also, you have NOT increased the volume of ethanol, so your ABV will drop.

H.
My point exactly. the volume of the "bottle" increases, and the alcohol does not, this causes the %abv in the said "bottle" to drop....

(I don't think you understood my sand-sugar comparison)...sugar doesn't disolve imediately. It displaces until it is disolved, and in doing so, the total volume of a bottle of bottle does not change wether it is undisolved or disolved.(maybe a tiny bit...but not to the eye)
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Post by possum » Fri Nov 03, 2006 9:56 am

Right pothead.
I notice that high abv booze does not allow good disolving action with granular sugar or caramel.
That is why I disolve the sugar into water first, then add the syrup to the booze. I do this for rums and cordials.

1st ...know how much equivilant 200proof alcohol is in batch
2nd add sweetner
3rd measure final volume

4th divide (how much equivilant 200proof alcohol is in batch) by (final volume)....that gives the final abv

...sugar messes up the working of a spirit hydrometer.
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Post by sherriff Buffoerd pusser » Mon Nov 06, 2006 10:08 pm

ran off my stuff for lemchello got it soaking on peels no sugar yet.came off at 91per. a little higher.It smells good hope it taste well to.I was sitting at shop peeling lemons and wacthing still should had door locked but some guy stoped to ask directions door flew open I bout shit guy ask before he left you making crack in here :lol: I guess I ll be looking over shoulder.I thought damn man you could knock first.
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Post by sherriff Buffoerd pusser » Sun Nov 12, 2006 12:23 am

I check my lemoncello tonight it has great colur and smell but no lemon taste and peels are almost white.Do I need to put some juice in with it I got 2Gal soaking on 2 bags of peels?hate to mess up that colur but got to do something.
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Post by CoopsOz » Sun Nov 12, 2006 3:30 am

"sherriff Buffoerd pusser"
door flew open I bout shit guy ask before he left you making crack in here :lol: I guess I ll be looking over shoulder.I thought damn man you could knock first.
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Post by Pieterpost » Fri Dec 08, 2006 11:40 am

You guys should also try limoncino. Made the same way but also toss in some lime leaves. This gives the drink a little more complexity. Very nice !

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Post by Bastardo » Sat Dec 09, 2006 4:30 pm

Ok guys back to the Limoncello, I love this stuff and would like to try making it.

Has anyone made a lemon juice base alcohol, distilled, then soaked the lemon rind.

If anyone knows of a recipe or has tried it let me know. Would the juice act as a nutrient?

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Re: lemoncello

Post by EuroStiller » Sun Apr 20, 2008 10:37 pm

Limoncello, Limoncello al Crema, Limoncino, Arancino, Agurmino, and Mandarinetto all come from the same basic formula. Macerating citrus peel in grain spirits for 40 days, then sugar syrup is added to the maceration and allowed to "mingle" for a day or so before it is filtered. Some people do not add sugar at all. In Sicily, alot of homemade Limoncello still has the peel left in it. Limoncello al Creama is a specialty of the Abruzzo & Molise regions of Italy. It is basically Limoncello, but with whole milk added. The combination of alcohol and sugar actually preserves the milk. Also from these regions is another milk-based liqueur which is out of this world! Limoncino is a combination of lemons, limes and citrons. It is a bit more intense and is often served from the freezer, like a slushy! Arancino is based solely on the Tarocco, or Blood Orange. Agurmino is an amalgamation of different types of citrus: oranges, tangerines, grapefruit, lime, citron, and some lemon. My family's recipe for Agurmino has 15 types of citrus peels in it. Of course, being in the US, it's not that easy to get all of them. But when I do go back home, I always make a huge batch to bring back to the States. On my last trip I brought back 5- 2 Liter glass bottles wrapped up in my clothing in my luggage! Mandarinetto is made exclusively from Mandarin Oranges and/or Honey Tangerines.


Here is my family's recipe for Limoncello
Cut the recipe down to fit your needs. Divide by a factor of 3

36 Lemons, zest only
6 Kg Grain Alcohol at 95% (Yes you have to weigh out the alcohol!)
3.6 Kg Pure Cane Sugar
7.2 L Distilled Water

Combine the lemon zest and the alcohol in a demijohn. Leave the mixture to macerate in a warm spot for 40 days, shaking the mixture daily. After 40 days, heat the water in a large pan. When it is hot, but not boiling, add the sugar. Stir until all of the sugar is dissolved. Remove from the fire. Cover and cool overnight. The next day add as much of the syrup as possible to the demijohn, leaving some room to shake. Cover the pan with the syrup in it, and set it aside. Re-seal the demijohn. Shake the mixture daily for 2 days. On that 3rd day, strain the limoncello and unite it with the remaining syrup. Filter the liqueur through muslin and bottle. Seal the bottles with corks and wax and store in a cool, dark place for a minimum of 3 months before consuming. When the liqueur is ready, always have 1 bottle in the refrigerator and 1 bottle at room temperature for guests! Serve neat, chilled, or over ice.

Makes about 15 Liters

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Re: lemoncello

Post by Rod » Mon Apr 21, 2008 10:10 pm

I make a Lemon Myrtle Liqueur

Pick 30 grams lemon myrtle leaves (no stalks)

Wash in cold water

Add 400 ml straight alcohol (40%)

Leave for 1 week , no more , to steep

Filter thru a fine sieve

Dissolve 200 grams sugar in 400 ml water and boil
Allow to cool

Mix with the lemon myrtle vodka and bottle

Makes about 1 litre
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Re: lemoncello

Post by EuroStiller » Tue Apr 22, 2008 4:48 am

I bet that tastes good! We don't have that in the areas of Italy I'm from; too cool in the Apennine mountains to sustain it. Even regular Myrtle does not do well, except in the very shallow lowlands, and I love to make liqueur from the berries. I do have a Rowan Tree that I am quite proud of. I brought "snuck" the sapling from the UK to Italy. The tree is now 5 years old and almost at its full height!! I love the raw berries, but I know that they are not good for me!! If you have access to Rowan berries, cook them, and make a nice liqueur from them. So good! Another neat little trick to "preserving summer in a bottle" is to make peach leaf wine/liqueur. Here is my recipe. I found it on the web some years ago, and have tweaked it to my liking.

Peschen
750 ml Moscato d’Asti Wine
250 ml Pure Grain Alcohol at 95-96%
70 Peach leaves, washed and patted dry*
2 Bitter Almonds OR 3 Apricot Kernels, cut into slivers (Omit if desired)
100 gr. Pure Cane Sugar
Zest of ½ Lemon, cut into strips

Combine all the ingredients in a 2-quart (US) canning jar with a tight fitting lid and steep them for 6 weeks, shaking the jar every now and again. Filter the mixture, using a layer of muslin moistened with alcohol. Bottle the liqueur and age for at least 6 months before drinking. Serve cold after dinner, with dessert. May also be served with a little crushed ice and/or soda water for those who may want a long drink.

*Be sure to choose leaves that are free of any imperfections. Cut the leaves from the branch; do not pull them off, before the tree has blossomed. Try to cut them in the mid-day, when the tree is most biologically active. Try also, to avoid any trees that have been sprayed with anything!

I'm asking my greengrocer to get me some Lemon Myrtle Leaves; I'm intrigued by your recipe.

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Re: lemoncello

Post by duds2u » Tue Apr 22, 2008 3:27 pm

If you substitute Kaffir lime leaves for the lemon myrtle you will find another very pleasant drink.
I have only tried it once so far and dried the leaves first but as my tree is just throwing a new bunch of leaves I going to try it with fresh leaves next time.
Less oak longer

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