Fried dill pickles

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As-Ol-Joe
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Fried dill pickles

Post by As-Ol-Joe » Tue Oct 23, 2007 8:07 pm

Does anybody like fried dill pickles? I just fried up a whole jar of hambuger slices for me and my working buddies. These thing could be habit forming.

Does anyone have a good recipe? I just coat mine withe corn meal mix and fry at 350. Really tasty.
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Post by Husker » Tue Oct 23, 2007 9:47 pm

They are super tasty. If anyone has a better recipe than a simple "fish batter", I would like to here it.

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Post by cannon.co.tn » Wed Oct 24, 2007 1:37 am

Place I get wallys does the spears. They use the same batter as their fish and chips.

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Post by Bsnapshot » Wed Oct 24, 2007 5:14 am

Hear are a few recipies I used

Deep-Fried Pickles

Peanut oil
1 quart dill pickles
1 cup buttermilk
2 cups plain cornmeal
1 tablespoon kosher salt, plus more, if desired
Place enough peanut oil in a 4 to 5-quart cast iron Dutch oven to come halfway up the side of the pot. Place over medium-high heat and bring to 390 to 400 degrees F.
Remove the pickles from their brine and cut lengthwise into quarters, like spears. Lay the spears on a sheet pan lined with paper towels and pat them dry.
Place the buttermilk in 1 shallow dish and mix together the cornmeal and salt in a separate dish. Dip each pickle, 1 at a time, first into the buttermilk, then into the cornmeal and then repeat. Carefully place each spear into the hot oil and cook until golden brown, approximately 2 minutes. You can fry 3 to 4 pickles in the pot at a time. Adjust the heat, if necessary, in order to maintain a constant temperature of 390 to 400 degrees F. Transfer the pickles to a cooling rack set in a half sheet pan and allow to cool for 5 minutes before eating. Season with additional salt, if desired.

Fried Pickles with Spicy Dipping Sauce
For sauce:
2 eggs
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 lemon, juiced
2 cups canola oil
1/4cup ketchup
2 tablespoons sweet pickle relish
1 tablespoon prepared horseradish
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
1 teaspoon Crystal Hot sauce
2 tablespoons chopped scallions (green part only)
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 lemon, juiced
For the pickles:
1 1/2 cups sliced dill pickles, drained and patted dry
4 eggs
1 cup milk
1 cup yellow cornmeal
1 cup masa harina
2 tablespoons season salt of your choice
Oil, for deep-frying
Prepare sauce: In a blender combine eggs, salt, and juice of half a lemon. Process briefly to combine. While motor is running, add oil in a slow, steady stream until mayonnaise has emulsified. Transfer to a non-reactive bowl and add all remaining ingredients. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Set aside to serve with fried pickles.
Drain pickle slices on paper towels. Combine the eggs and milk. Coat pickles with egg wash. Combine cornmeal and masa harina and season with Essence. Transfer pickles to seasoned cornmeal, shake off any excess, and deep fry in 350 degree F. oil in batches until golden brown, about 3 minutes. Drain well on paper towels before serving

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Post by Bsnapshot » Wed Oct 24, 2007 5:21 am

Fried dill pickles

1 cup buttermilk
2 eggs
2 cups all-purpose flour
Salt, to taste
Freshly ground black pepper, to taste
Canola oil, for frying (about 10 cups for a 4-quart Dutch oven)
4 large kosher dill pickles, sliced thin on the diagonal

Mix the buttermilk and eggs together in one bowl, and the flour, salt, and pepper in another.
Heat 2 to 3 inches of oil in a Dutch oven until it reaches 325 to 350 degrees on a deep-fry thermometer.

Line a baking sheet with a brown paper bag or paper towels.

Dip the pickle slices in the buttermilk mixture and then into the seasoned flour. Using tongs, drop the coated pickles, one by one, into the hot oil; fry about 2 pickles worth of slices in each batch. Be sure to regulate the heat so that the oil stays between 325 and 350 degrees.

When the pickles are a light golden color (this should take 7 to 9 minutes), remove them with tongs or a slotted spoon and drain them on the prepared baking sheet. Repeat with the remaining pickles.

Sprinkle a little salt on them (remember, pickles are pretty salty) and serve as you would French fries.


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Post by punkin » Wed Oct 24, 2007 12:08 pm

Jeez, never heard of the like :shock:

Reckon i'll give the pickles a try, next week at Friday Night Drinks, but i think the sauce may be a little adventuous for an uneducated aussie pallate :?

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Post by bronzdragon » Wed Oct 24, 2007 12:25 pm

I had never tasted or heard of these until I moved into the South. I've tasted them a few times over the years as they are on a lot of restaurant menus, under the Appetizer section. I don't really care for them myself. They aren't terrible, but just one of those things where I could eat 2 or 3 and be done.

Everyone has different tastes however.

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Post by duds2u » Wed Oct 24, 2007 2:47 pm

That's got to right up there with deep fried Mars bars

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Post by CoopsOz » Wed Oct 24, 2007 2:54 pm

Speaking of dill pickles, why do you get a free one when ordering a sandwich in the States. I spent 3 or 4 months in Tampa in 2002, I was working out of Mcdill (sp?) AFB. Everytime I'd buy a sandwich, they would give me a free pickle. I ain't complaining, I love the things.....it just doesn't happen here in Australia.
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Post by BW Redneck » Wed Oct 24, 2007 3:54 pm

duds2u wrote:That's got to right up there with deep fried Mars bars
Not to mention deep fried oreos, deep fried twinkies, deep fried fudge, deep fried ice cream.....
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Post by bronzdragon » Wed Oct 24, 2007 3:57 pm

Coops, a pickle spear is a traditional accompaniment to a sandwich here in the States, usually with chips or fries. Kind of like when you order a sandwich dressed here, it usually means you want lettuce, tomato and onion on it.

I've been in different countries where the "usual" on sandwiches is different, and definitely things they serve with sandwiches is different.

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Post by Ricky » Wed Oct 24, 2007 4:46 pm

cut your pickles with a french fry cutter and batter with meal. i like them with fried catfish. make you slap your momma!
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Post by Husker » Thu Oct 25, 2007 4:10 am

BW Redneck wrote:
duds2u wrote:That's got to right up there with deep fried Mars bars
Not to mention deep fried oreos, deep fried twinkies, deep fried fudge, deep fried ice cream.....
The Mexicans have deep fried ice cream :) Pretty dam good also.

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Post by BW Redneck » Thu Oct 25, 2007 12:54 pm

Once you think about it, we Americans will just about deep fry anything as long as it stands still long enough. :lol:
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Post by blanikdog » Thu Oct 25, 2007 4:28 pm

Deep fried camenbert is pretty good too. What a fascinating forum this is. :)

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Post by Rudi » Thu Oct 25, 2007 4:38 pm

love the deep fried camenbert served with a sprig of deep fried parsley dunno about a deep fried pickle though But I'll give most things a go once.I am still shocked that you guys actually deep fry WHOLE turkeys :shock:
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Post by bronzdragon » Thu Oct 25, 2007 5:03 pm

Oh yeah, a properly injected and fried turkey is great. When they're done right, I don't think there's a better way to cook a turkey. Of course they can be greasy and not that great if you fry them at too low a temperature etc.

We also make Turduckens down here, which are tasty roasted up. A deboned chicken inside a deboned duck, inside a deboned turkey. They are all kind of rolled together and tied. You roast them, and when you slice them, you get a bit of each meat in your slice. Mmmmmm.

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Post by BW Redneck » Thu Oct 25, 2007 5:14 pm

Rudi wrote:love the deep fried camenbert served with a sprig of deep fried parsley dunno about a deep fried pickle though But I'll give most things a go once.I am still shocked that you guys actually deep fry WHOLE turkeys :shock:
That's how garages catch fire during the Thanksgiving season. Also, without them, a lot of us would be without propane rings to power our stills. :wink:
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Post by Aidas » Thu Oct 25, 2007 11:24 pm

BW Redneck wrote:Once you think about it, we Americans will just about deep fry anything as long as it stands still long enough. :lol:
I think the Scots have the Americans beat. They deepfry Snickers, Mars bars, etc... :shock: And they put ketchup on the result... :?

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Post by Rudi » Fri Oct 26, 2007 12:44 am

Aidas wrote: And they put ketchup on the result... :?


I am quite partial to the sweet savoury flavour think nachos but substitute melted chocolate for the cheese. Most people think I'm nuts but I reckon if it tastes good.............
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Post by Aidas » Fri Oct 26, 2007 1:05 am

Oh, I'm all for savory/sweet. I like my oatmeal salty and sweet at the same time. Chinese food is often salty/sweet.

However, deep fried snickers with ketchup is a bit beyond...

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Post by Rudi » Fri Oct 26, 2007 2:10 am

Aidas wrote:.
However, deep fried snickers with ketchup is a bit beyond...
I'd give it a go
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Post by punkin » Fri Oct 26, 2007 12:23 pm

Bloody missus told me that Dill Pickles in American was the same as Sweet Spiced Gherkins in Australian.
So i bought a jar yesterday intending to try em on the drunks that turn up here on fri nights.
Till someone informed me they were not the same at all.....

Will have ta have a look at a bigger supermarket. :cry:

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Post by Husker » Fri Oct 26, 2007 12:54 pm

American dill's are not sweet. They are a sour (vinegar/salt canned product), with dill (or dill weed / dill seed). Frequently there will also be other spices added, such as fresh onion or fresh garlic.

They are a spicy gerkin, but "sweet", I doubt.

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Post by bronzdragon » Fri Oct 26, 2007 1:51 pm

I agree with Husker. Dill pickles are sour. They are "pickled" mainly with vinegar and dill as flavoring.

We also have an assortment of other pickles that are considered sweet, which have sugar and such added. My favorite being home-made "Bread and Butter" pickles.

But the standard dill pickle spear is sour and meant to go along with the sandwich. Some being crisp and some being kinda soggy. lol I can't believe this thread about pickles has went on for so long.

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Post by Bsnapshot » Sat Oct 27, 2007 9:17 pm

If you all want to try something good.. Sounds strnge but salt and pepper a 5-8 pound prime rib put it in your turkey fryer for about 35-45 minutes and it comes out very good.. don't knock it before you try it..

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Post by Johnny Reb » Sun Oct 28, 2007 5:04 am

Bsnapshot wrote:Hear are a few recipies I used

Deep-Fried Pickles

Peanut oil
1 quart dill pickles
1 cup buttermilk
2 cups plain cornmeal
1 tablespoon kosher salt, plus more, if desired
Place enough peanut oil in a 4 to 5-quart cast iron Dutch oven to come halfway up the side of the pot. Place over medium-high heat and bring to 390 to 400 degrees F.
Remove the pickles from their brine and cut lengthwise into quarters, like spears. Lay the spears on a sheet pan lined with paper towels and pat them dry.
Place the buttermilk in 1 shallow dish and mix together the cornmeal and salt in a separate dish. Dip each pickle, 1 at a time, first into the buttermilk, then into the cornmeal and then repeat. Carefully place each spear into the hot oil and cook until golden brown, approximately 2 minutes. You can fry 3 to 4 pickles in the pot at a time. Adjust the heat, if necessary, in order to maintain a constant temperature of 390 to 400 degrees F. Transfer the pickles to a cooling rack set in a half sheet pan and allow to cool for 5 minutes before eating. Season with additional salt, if desired.

Fried Pickles with Spicy Dipping Sauce
For sauce:
2 eggs
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 lemon, juiced
2 cups canola oil
1/4cup ketchup
2 tablespoons sweet pickle relish
1 tablespoon prepared horseradish
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
1 teaspoon Crystal Hot sauce
2 tablespoons chopped scallions (green part only)
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 lemon, juiced
For the pickles:
1 1/2 cups sliced dill pickles, drained and patted dry
4 eggs
1 cup milk
1 cup yellow cornmeal
1 cup masa harina
2 tablespoons season salt of your choice
Oil, for deep-frying
Prepare sauce: In a blender combine eggs, salt, and juice of half a lemon. Process briefly to combine. While motor is running, add oil in a slow, steady stream until mayonnaise has emulsified. Transfer to a non-reactive bowl and add all remaining ingredients. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Set aside to serve with fried pickles.
Drain pickle slices on paper towels. Combine the eggs and milk. Coat pickles with egg wash. Combine cornmeal and masa harina and season with Essence. Transfer pickles to seasoned cornmeal, shake off any excess, and deep fry in 350 degree F. oil in batches until golden brown, about 3 minutes. Drain well on paper towels before serving
Seems like a whole lotta work just to eat a pickle :shock:

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Post by Blais » Wed Nov 07, 2007 5:07 am

Oh heck yeah!

We used to serve deep-fried pickles and jalapeno slices at a bar where I worked. I found the best method is to use Klausen brand or similar crispy pickle, so it doesn't wilt into mush in the frier, and really coat it with clam-fry batter before you throw it in.


P.S. The fried Jalapeno slices are great on burgers/sandwiches with a dijon-style or spicy mayonaise.

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Post by punkin » Wed Nov 07, 2007 10:22 am

Haven't tried it yet, but did get the right ingredients, i think.'Original Dill Pickles' and a packet of store bought Tempura Batter.

Goin hunting this w'end, but friday night drinks next week, look out. :shock:

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Post by Husker » Wed Nov 07, 2007 10:30 am

I think u got the right stuff.

NOTE you will want to find pickles that are the crispiest you can find (they vary a LARGE amount). I do my own gardening, and have a dill patch, and produce a lot of pickles. I do my pickes by bringing my water temp up to 180 °F for a longer time, vs boiling. When you can using boiling method, pickles get much softer. When you pickle with cool water (180°F is cool), then they stay VERY crunchy, but can properly.

I have now made a few batches of fried dills. Once was done using some very crispy dills, and one batch done with some store bought. There was a large difference. The crispy ones fried up MUCH better. The store bought actually ended up kind of soggy. The taste of both batches was good, however, but the presentation was much better, using a crispy (firm) pickle spear to start with.

The recipes listed here have worked out nicely. I also like the dipping sauce.
H.

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