Don't run your Mash dry?

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Don't run your Mash dry?

Postby jon1163 » Fri Apr 13, 2018 11:15 am

Making pure corn whiskey, a professional guide for amateur and micro distillers by Ian smiley.

My buddy was telling me about this part of the book that talks about distilling no more than 96 hours after you pitch yeast. I read the book but it doesn't say why. Does anyone know anything about this? Here's the quote:

"As a general rule, a fermenting mash should be distilled as soon as the vigorous primary fermentation stops, or slows down to a spurious bubbling, regardless of how complete the fermentation is. So, unless the match is still fermenting vigorously it should be distilled after no more than 96 hours after adding the yeast".
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Re: Don't run your Mash dry?

Postby pfshine » Fri Apr 13, 2018 1:39 pm

If he was open fermenting outside he might have been worried about an Acetobacter infection.
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Re: Don't run your Mash dry?

Postby jon1163 » Fri Apr 13, 2018 1:53 pm

do you think it has anything to do with taste? I just put down a rye and during the first two days it smelled wonderful. Like spiced bread fermenting. Now that the alcohol has built up in the mash that smell has disappeared mostly...
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Re: Don't run your Mash dry?

Postby Kareltje » Fri Apr 13, 2018 2:06 pm

I am not an expert, but past year I had my grain ferments for about a week, so quite longer than 96 hours. Maybe they had been better when I had run them earlier, but they were still fermenting.

A statement of such a kind without a reason, I would not believe without support.
I would prefer to run my mash dry, presuming I also get more taste. But maybe I am wrong. Please prove me!
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Re: Don't run your Mash dry?

Postby Twisted Brick » Sat Apr 14, 2018 11:58 am

There are actually quite a few threads here that address running old wash/mashes. Just HD Google something like: year-old wash. A heap of guys have let their wash sit for months in an effort to clear them and reported no problem. Same for the guys who forgot to run their wash/mash. Course it helps if there's liquid in the airlock and the wash was stored at cold temps.
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Re: Don't run your Mash dry?

Postby der wo » Sat Apr 14, 2018 1:04 pm

This book is full of individual thoughts. Not like you learn in distilling school. Good or bad, perhaps you will find out sooner or later.
96h: This is a safety advice I think. No infections within such a duration. And with more time you won't get much more yield normally.
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Re: Don't run your Mash dry?

Postby raketemensch » Sat Apr 14, 2018 6:54 pm

There’s honestly all kinds of weird advice in that book. The main still he walks you through building is built out of a water heater, but he doesn’t talk about materials at all. I’ve never seen copper or stainless water heaters in the US.
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Re: Don't run your Mash dry?

Postby cranky » Sun Apr 15, 2018 4:28 am

That advice comes up frequently, I think the thinking behind that was a belief that fermenting longer would result in unwanted conegers or something like that. It may have been based on the way the large commercial distilleries do it. Either way I also believe that that statement has driven many newer distillers to worry aabout letting a ferment go long enough to actually finish even though the people here have proven that statement to be completely falsey tell people a ferment will finish when it finishes and it's best not to try to force things..
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Re: Don't run your Mash dry?

Postby goose eye » Sun Apr 15, 2018 12:18 pm

Fear of mother

Single footin suger shine a tad of sweet will come .
Save the hot slops if your a mind two

Air tite barrel of country wine can still be
good after years if you use your wits.



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Re: Don't run your Mash dry?

Postby pfshine » Sun Apr 15, 2018 1:53 pm

goose eye wrote:Fear of mother
So I'm tole

Yeah that. Nobody wants to drink vinegar.
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Re: Don't run your Mash dry?

Postby Kareltje » Sun Apr 15, 2018 2:27 pm

That might be a problem for drinkers of wine or beer.
But distilling vinegar doesn't work, judging by my experience. :evil:
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Re: Don't run your Mash dry?

Postby JellybeanCorncob » Sun Apr 15, 2018 2:49 pm

raketemensch wrote:There’s honestly all kinds of weird advice in that book. The main still he walks you through building is built out of a water heater, but he doesn’t talk about materials at all. I’ve never seen copper or stainless water heaters in the US.

Water heaters have a glass lining. At least in the States.
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Re: Don't run your Mash dry?

Postby The Baker » Sun Apr 15, 2018 6:44 pm

JellybeanCorncob wrote:
raketemensch wrote:There’s honestly all kinds of weird advice in that book. The main still he walks you through building is built out of a water heater, but he doesn’t talk about materials at all. I’ve never seen copper or stainless water heaters in the US.

Water heaters have a glass lining. At least in the States.
JBC


That's the newer ones.
The ones from longer ago were copper.
You must be one of the newer fellows?

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Re: Don't run your Mash dry?

Postby JellybeanCorncob » Sun Apr 15, 2018 7:17 pm

http://www.waterheaterrescue.com/Longev ... eater.html
Check this out Baker.
They have been making water heaters with bonded virtuous glass for decades.
JBC
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Re: Don't run your Mash dry?

Postby The Baker » Sun Apr 15, 2018 9:29 pm

JellybeanCorncob wrote:http://www.waterheaterrescue.com/Longevity/Inside-A-hot-water-heater.html
Check this out Baker.
They have been making water heaters with bonded virtuous glass for decades.
JBC


Yep. I am talking about longer ago than that.

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