Oak Barrels

Any hardware used for mashing, fermenting or aging.

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AlaOutlaw
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Oak Barrels

Post by AlaOutlaw » Sun May 29, 2005 8:24 pm

I was looking at the Gibb's Brothers site for an aging barrel. I see they have charred oak and toasted oak barrels. Could somebody please tell me which one I would need for soaking a sour mash whiskey in? What qualities do each impart on your alcohol? I have never aged any spirits before and this is new to me. I have used heavy toasted oak chips before and I liked the flavor real well but for barrel aging I'm not sure as to what I need. Thanks.

AlaOutlaw
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Post by AlaOutlaw » Sun May 29, 2005 10:46 pm

Also have any of you guys dealt with http://www.kentuckybarrels.com onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;" rel="nofollow? Would their used bourbon barrels be worth using?

Grayson_Stewart
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Post by Grayson_Stewart » Mon May 30, 2005 1:02 am

I wouldn't use a used barrel myself, and I sure wouldn't pay for a used barrel if they won't guarantee it isn't going to leak.

You answered your own question on type of barrel, if you like toasted use that, if you want a traditional whisky use a charred barrel.
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Pieterpost
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Post by Pieterpost » Mon May 30, 2005 6:28 am

isn't toasted similar to a light char? This made me wonder, when does (heavily) toasted become charred?

The Chemist
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Post by The Chemist » Mon May 30, 2005 6:48 am

Pieterpost wrote:isn't toasted similar to a light char? This made me wonder, when does (heavily) toasted become charred?
No, Pieterpost, toasted means just that. "Toasted" means gently heated only until the wood becomes some desired shade of brown. There is a great range of toasting, as it is a gentle, and continuous process. Toasted barrels are used almost exclusively for wine.

"Charring", on the other hand, is done with an open (quite large and impressive, if you've seen it done) flame. "Charring" causes the wood to turn black. This change from brown to black is the difference in "toasting" and "charring" The technical name for charring is pyrolysis, and is a different set of reactions than the less extreme toasting. Charring, in the industry, is generally limited to four degrees of char.
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outlawokie
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Post by outlawokie » Mon May 30, 2005 8:19 am

There are alot of posts on this forum on this subject take your time and read chare some white oak and toast some white oak cut your hooch to50 to60% jar it up watch and taste you could also through in a couple of pepper corns in if you like the idea is to see what both will do age to your liking cheers :D
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Pieterpost
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Post by Pieterpost » Tue May 31, 2005 1:28 am

I have tried toasted oak already and I must say that I like the result (although one must be very carefull with the amount of toasted oak used)

haven't had much experience with charring though ...... must give that a try with the next batch!

DBM

Oak Barrels

Post by DBM » Tue May 31, 2005 1:11 pm

Call Gibbs Barrel Co. and place your order. The girl that you will be dealing with is very knowledgeble, and helpful. Tell her what you want the end result to be & she will tell you what you need. If it's your first experience with oak barrels she will also pass on some tips on "how to" so you don't windup 20 min after doing something saying "I wish I hadda".

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